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Full text of "Maryland Alumni News"

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in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



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Maryland 

Alumni 









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Volume X 



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MARYLAND ALUMNI NEWS, JUNE, 1938 



Number 1 



Alumni Association-University of Maryland 

Founded in 1892 

♦ 

Officers for 1938-39 

C. WALTER COLE, '21, President 

Towson, Md. 

Charles W. Sylvester, '08, Vice-President G. F. Pollock, '23, Sec-Treasurer 

Baltimore, Md. College Park, Md. 

Alumni Board 

(Note — The officers named above are also members of the Alumni Board) 
Reuben Brigham, '08, P. W. Chichester, '20, Education 

Arts and Sciences John A. Silkman, '35, Agriculture 

Charles V. Koons, '29, Engineering Ruth Miles, '31, Home Economics 

Members at Large 

Esther Hughes Lee, '33, Women's Rep. J. Donald Kieffer, '30, Men's Rep. 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Editor 

Maryland Alumni News, issued monthly by the University of Maryland 
Alumni Association at College Park, Md., as second-class matter under the Act 
of Congress of March 3, 1879. 

Annual Alumni Association dues are $2.00. One year's subscription to 
Alumni News, 50 cents. 

Group Leaders 

Allegany County: E. Brooke Whiting, '98, President; Dr. Joseph Franklin, '21, Secretary, Cum- 
berland, Md. 

Baltimore County: C. Walter Cole, '21, President; H. B. Derrick, '17, Secretary, Towson, Md. 

Baltimore City: Chester Tawney, '31, President, 4022 Roland Avenue; E. Gordon Hammond, '34, 
Secretary, 1023 W. Barre Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Caroline County: George W. Clendaniel, '20, President, Denton; Dr. Maurice A. Brackett, '21. 
Treasurer, Denton ; Mrs. George W. Clendaniel, '21, Secretary, Denton. 

Harford County: W. B. Munnikhuysen, '14, President; H. M. Carroll, '20, Secretary, Bel Air, Md. 

Frederick County: J. Homer Remsberg, '18, President; Henry R. Shoemaker, '17. Secretary, 
Frederick, Md. 

Montgomery County: Lawrence G. Smoot, '18. President. Kensington, Md. ; Mary Fisher, '36, 
Secretary. Rockville, Md. 

New York City: Donald Kieffer, '30, President, 195 Broadway; Sarah Morris, '25, Secretary, 
140 E. 63rd Street, New York City. 

Philadelphia: A. Moulton McNutt, '06, President, 413 Cooper Street, Camden, N. J.; J. P. Mudd, 
'07, Secretary, 173 Manheim Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pittsburg: E. Minor Wenner, '27, President, 1111 Gladys Avenue; Dr. A. A. Krieger, '32, Sec- 
retary, Highland Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Washington, D. C: J. Douglas Wallop, '19, President, 6139 N. Dakota Avenue, N. W. ; C. Vincent 
Koons, '29, Secretary, 419 Fourth Street, N. E.. Washington. 

Washington County: Hon. Henry Holzapfel, Jr., '93, President, Hagerstown, Md. ; L. G. Mathias, 
'23, Secretary, Hagerstown, Md. 

"M" Club Officers and Board Members 



President — Dr. A. A. Parker, '04. 
Vice-President — Donald H. Adams, 



'28. 



Secretary-Treas. — Dr. E. N. Cory, '09. 
Historian — Bob Hill, '26. 



Representatives 



Baseball- G. F. Pollock, '23. 
Basket-ball— H. B. Shipley, '14. 
Boxing — Victor Wingate, '35. 
Lacrosse — James Stevens, '19. 
Track— Lewis W. Thomas, '28. 



Tennis — James Shumate, '17. 
Cross Co. — Charles Remsberg, '26. 
Football— Kirk Besley, '23. 
At Large — Dr. E. B. Friedenwald, '03. 
Dr. A. W. Valentine, '04. 



Cover Picture 

Is that of a commencement when 
more than 700 graduates receive their 
diplomas. The exercises are held in 
the Ritchie Coliseum at College Park 
the first Saturday in June. Busses 
bring the graduates from the profes- 
sional schools in Baltimore to College 
Park for the exercises. More than five 
thousand people annually assemble for 
this impressive occasion. 

Snapshots— Alumni Day 

(Opposite Page) 
1 — Mr. and Mrs. Dunnington, '14 
2— Dr. A. W. Valentine, '04 
3— Melvin C. Hazen, '88, first presi- 
dent of the Alumni Association, 
met by members of Mortor 
Board, Co-ed Honor Society. 
Ida Fisher, Elinor Broughton, 
Betty Maslin, Dorothy Hobbs, 
and Eileen Kellerman 
4 — W. D. Groff, '00, never misses 
5 — Byron Morse, '13, and family 
6— Austin Diggs, '21, E. F. Zalesak, 
'25, immediate past president of 
Alumni Association 
7— Raising the flag of '88, Dr. Byrd, 
'08, congratulating Hazen, '88, 
with Peggy Maslin and Elinor 
Broughton supporting 
8 — Henry Peck Ames, '13, and his 

future Marylanders 
9— E. S. Walker, '69, oldest alumnus, 
and Ralph Williams, '33 
10— Bill Maslin, '09, and Peggy, '39 
11— Senator M. E. Tydings, '10 
12— J. Hanson Mitchell, '98 
13— Roger Burdette, '33, Dick White- 
ford, '01, W. F. Mattingly, '98, 
and C. W. Cairnes, '94 
14— Class of '88, Dr. L. B. Johnson, 

Melvin C. Hazen 
15 — Ladies of Class of '13, in waiting 
16— Hazen, '88, greeting Walker, '69 
17— Sox Trimble, '13, son, '41, and Mrs. 

Trimble 
18 — Jimmy Stevens, '19, and Jimmy 

Swartz, '19 
19 — Gwyndolyn Sargent Blanz, '31, 
Madeline Bernard, '31, Mildred 
Kettler, '31, Margaret Cook, '31, 
Elizabeth Taylor, '27, Edna 
Burnside Howard, '29, Grace 
Laleger, '28, and Ruth Miles, '31 
20— Dr. L. B. Broughton, '08, and 

daughter, Elinor, '38 
21 — Hazen signs for President Byrd 



Makyland Alumni News 



NEW ALUMNI OFFICERS 




John Silkman, '35; J. Donald Kieffer, '30; Chcis. W. Sylvester, '08, and C. Walter Cole, '21. 



Portrait Of President Byrd 

Unveiled At Annual Alumni Reunion 



/"VNE of the largest and most inter- 
^ esting alumni meetings in recent 
years was held on Alumni Day of this 
year. First, the annual luncheon was 
held in the University Dining Hall 
followed by the meeting. 

Portrait Presented 

A most eminent gesture was made 
following the luncheon by two of 
Maryland's most distinguished alumni 
— James W. Stevens and James M. 
Swartz of the class of 1919 — when in 
a modest but most impressive manner 
they presented to the University a por- 
trait in oil of President H. C. Byrd — 
their coach, teacher, and friend. Pro- 
fessor Charles S. Richardson, well 
known to all former students, accepted 
in his eloquent language, the portrait 
on behalf of the University. Hon. 
Henry Holzapfel, '93, senior member 
of the board of regents, praised the 
gift in a most gracious manner as the 
significance of a most friendly thought. 
President Byrd, after making a few 
brief remarks about the friendly rec- 
ognition by two of his most intimate 
friends, concluded by saying: "I am 
unable to adequately express my ap- 
preciation and will conclude by simply 
saying, Thank you!" 

Following President Byrd's remarks 
the entire audience stood and sang 
"Maryland, My Maryland" as a tribute 
to our great leader, president, alum- 
nus, and friend, who so ably carries 
out Maryland traditions in leadership. 

The annual meeting of the associ- 



ation was called to order by President 
E. F. Zalesak. A resume of the min- 
utes of the previous meeting were pre- 
sented by the secretary, also the 
treasurer's report which showed more 
of a balance this year than last year. 
A report from the secretary-treasurer 
was brief because of the shortness of 
time. President Zalesak then gave the 
president's annual message in which 
there were worthwhile suggestions for 
the incoming officers. All past presi- 
dents of the association were presented 
by the president, ending with our first 
president, Melvin C. Hazen, the hon- 
ored guest of the day, who was asked 
to address the meeting. "I think there 
is no greater asset for a university 
than a strong alumni association," 
said Mr. Hazen, class of '88. 

President Zalesak introduced sever- 
al other distinguished visitors, among 
whom were Dr. R. P. Bay, president 
of the Medical Alumni; Dr. John Stre- 
vig, president of the Pharmacy Alum- 
ni, and Mr. E. S. Walker, the oldest 
alumnus present that day. The re- 
union classes and group leaders were 
also introduced. 

Nominating Committee 

The report of the nominating com- 
mittee was asked for. This was pre- 
sented by George O. Weber, '33, chair- 
man, as follows: C. Walter Cole, '21, 
president; Charles W. Sylvester, '08, 
vice-president; representative for the 
College of Agriculture, John Silkman, 
'35; representative -at -large for wo- 



men, Esther Hughes Lee, '33; and rep- 
resentative-at-large for men, J. Don 
Kieffer, '30. 

A motion was made that the nomi- 
nations be accepted and that the secre- 
tary cast a ballot for unanimous elec- 
tion. Past President Zalesak then 
called President Cole to the head table 
and presented him with the gavel for 
1938-39. A few words from President 
Cole and the meeting was adjourned 
so all could attend the lacrosse game 
in Byrd Stadium. 
• 

Alumni Supper Dance Success 

The concluding event on the Alumni 
Day program was the supper dance 
held in the gymnasium. Here more 
than 150 alumni and their friends as- 
sembled to dine and dance. A delight- 
ful supper was served in the Univer- 
sity dining hall. Music for dancing 
was furnished by Sam McFarlene and 
his Maryland Collegians. 

Following supper, a special enter- 
tainment in the form of a floor show 
was presented through the cooperation 
of the University Music Department 
and the Women's Physical Education 
Department. It was a delightful per- 
formance. 

Members of the senior class were 
the guests of the Alumni Association 
for dancing until 12, when the curtain 
fell on the 46th annual alumni reunion. 

Frats Have Open House 

For the annual alumni reunion all 
fraternity and sorority houses held 
open house and receptions for the re- 
turning old grads. Several held their 
spring formals or senior farewell 
dances the evening before. 



June, 1938 



The Fifty- Year Class 

Outstanding among the reunions was 
the class of '88, celebrating its fifthieth 
anniversary. Two members were pres- 
ent — Melvin C. Hazen, first president 
of the Alumni Association and his old 
roommate, Dr. L. B. Johnson, of Mor- 
ganza, Md. 

They have established the precedent 
for the fifty-year class which is to 
fly their flag on the memorial flag 
pole for Alumni Day. It was one of 
the highlights of the day's program, 
when at noon the class flag of '88 was 
raised. 

Mr. Hazen now is chairman of the 
Board of Commissioners for the Dis- 
trict of Columbia. He has been in 
the service of the District for more 
than 40 years. Dr. Johnson is a most 
prominent physician and surgeon of 
Southern Maiyland. He is also a grad- 
uate of the University of Maryland 
Medical School. 

The two members present repre- 
sented two-thirds of their class, as 
J. W. Lawson, the only other surviving 
member, now in Atlanta, Ga., was un- 
able to be present. 

'08 Celebrate 
Thirtieth Anniversary 

One of the most active classes in the 
Association is that of 1908. Each 
year they hold a regular meeting of 
the class and they have never missed 
the five year celebration. 

The annual meeting is held in the 
office of their illustrious member, Dr. 
H. C. Byrd, president of their Alma 
Mater. Many worth while resolutions 
or plans have developed out of these 
meetings, which are usually well 
attended. Out of the class roster of 
twenty-five there were sixteen mem- 
bers present for the reunion this year. 
They were as follows: W. H. Thomas, 
C. A. Warthen, Chas. W. Sylvester, 
W. A. S. Somerville, U. W. Long, 
S. M. Lowry, Reuben Brigham, Nor- 
man E. Brice, George G. Becker, H. B. 
Hoshall, G. C. Day, J. William Firor, 
Richard L. Silvester, E. I. Oswald, 
L. B. Broughton. 

At the annual meeting of the asso- 
ciation, Charles W. Sylvester, on be- 
half of his class, presented a resolution 
inaugurating a foundation fund for 
the erection of a library as a suitable 
memorial to Captain R. W. Silvester, 
former president of the College Park 
Schools, who did so much for the 
advancement of the institntion. 

The high point of the day's program 



for the class was a reception and open 
house held by their classmate, Pics. 
H. C. Byrd, at his home in Calvert 
Hills. It was a reunion long to be 
remembered ! 

• 

Past Presidents 
Attend Reunion 

When the annual reunion of the Al- 
umni Association was held this spring- 
in honor of Melvin C. Hazen, '88, its 
first president, more than half of the 
living past presidents were on hand. 
They are named here in order as to their 
time in office: Dr. T. B. Symons, '02, 
(1935-36), Director cf the University 
of Maryland Agricultural Extension 
Service; Honorable Millard E. Ty- 
dings, '10, (1931-33), United States 
Senator from Maryland ; Henry C. 
Whiteford, '01, (1929-31), canning 
business, Hartford County; J. Hansen 
Mitchell, '98, (1926-29), oil burner 
and air-conditioning engineer, Balti- 
more, Maryland; Honorable Henry 
Holzapfel, '93, (1913-15), vice-pres- 
ident, Potomac Edison Company, Hag- 
erstown, Maryland, and member of 
the University Board of Regents; W. 
D. Groff, '00, (1911-12), feed business, 
Owings Mills, Maryland; F. W. Besley, 
'92, (1909-11), state forester; Dr. 
Frank B. Bomberger, '94, (1898-02), 
president, Baltimore Bank for Coop- 
eiatives. J. P. Mudd, '07, (1933-34), 
steel engineer, Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania telegraphed his greetings. 

• 

Interesting Notes 

As you mingled among the return- 
ing old grads on Alumni Day you 
heard many interesting stories. There 
were actually more heard than the 
writer could possibly remember, but 
here are a few of interest. 

You hear about alumni coming great 
distances for one-day reunion. Well, 
here is one for the book! A. By- 
ron Morse, '13, of Chicago, was out in 
Minneapolis, Minn., on Wednesday, 
May 18. He had promised his class- 
mates to be with them Saturday, May 
21. He drove from Minneapolis to 
Chicago, got his family together and 
started by auto for Pittsburg where 
he picked up a classmate, Sox Trimble 
and his family, and thence to College 
Park. Immediately after the reunion 
he had to retrace his mileage quickly, 
as business engagements were press- 
ing. The total mileage was something 
over 2,000 miles for a one-day re- 
union with those former classmates 



Twenty-Five Years Ago 

It was twenty-five years ago when 
the class of 1913 said goodby to College 
Park. On Saturday, May 21, fifteen of 
the twenty-five to graduate returned 
for their reunion bringing with them 
their families. In all, there were more 
than forty persons in the group. 

The class meeting was held in the 
old familiar physics room in the Engi- 
neering Building. Under the leader- 
ship of Ed Powell, each member of the 
class was supplied with a jacket upon 
which the large number, 13, was im- 
printed. This identification was worn 
throughout the day. 

As a feature of the Alumni Day, 
Ed Powell, who was instrumental in 
starting lacrosse at College Park, 
tossed out the ball which started the 
annual Hopkins-Maryland game being 
played that day in Byrd Stadium. 
Powell was accompanied by his class- 
mates, who were members of the team. 

The members of '13 who were pres- 
ent for the reunion were : George 
Byron Morse, Ed Powell, Samuel W. 
Blankman, M. E. Davis, Gladden 
Davis, Henry S. Dearstyne, George P. 
Trax, Ralph S. Healy, A. E. Irwing, 
J. Roland Reichardo, Harry W. 
Townsend, A. Morris Todd, Ernest 
Trimble, Wm. H. White, C. M. White. 

who make fellowship and friendship 
what it really is. 

□ 

Another one from a distance was J. 
C. Long from Chico, California. He 
arranged a trip East for this spring 
with the idea of having it take in the 
first alumni reunion he had attended 
in 20 years. 

□ 

The long-distant traveler was Pres- 
ton L. Peach, '03, who is on furlough 
from the Federated Malaya States in 
the East Indies. He timed his fur- 
lough to be here for the alumni re- 
union. Peach had many interesting- 
tales to tell about the Far Eastern 
conditions. 

□ 

The prize of the day for the oldest 
alumnus present was won by E. S. 
Walker, '70. Mr. Walker first entered 
the College Park schools in 1867. He 
has been a familiar figure at many of 
the recent alumni gatherings. He is 
92 years old and is the father of 
16 children. He was the first alum- 
nus to respond to an appeal through 
the columns of the Alumni News, a 
few years ago, for additional funds in 
order to carry on the program. He is 
a shining example of alumni loyalty. 



Maryland Alumni News 



Annual Meeting of New York Group 




Watts, '04, Directs New York Meeting 



N MAY 14 the annual spring dinner 
of the Maryland Alumni Club of 
New York was held at the Shelton Ho- 
tel. It was the largest assemblage in 
the history of this group, with the Old 
Line spirit running high. 

Hany Watts, '04, acted as toastmas- 
ter for the occasion. Dr. L. B. Brough- 
ton, '08, now dean of the College of 
Arts and Sciences, gave an interesting- 
talk on the progress of his division of 
the University. He stressed the neces- 
sity for improvement in the courses in 
fine arts and described the efforts be- 
ing made by the present administra- 
tion at College Park to meet this need. 
"Swede" Eppley spoke in his own in- 
imitable fashion on extra-curricular ac- 
tivities. Frank Dobson, head football 
coach; Harvey Caskarian, treasurer of 
the University; Rosy Pollock, '23, sec- 
retary of the Alumni, and Emanuel 
Zalesak, '25, president of the Alumni, 
gave brief addresses. 

President Don Kieffer, '30, reported 
on the groups activities during the 
year and urged the Alumni to return to 
College Park frequently to observe the 
improvement there. Don was elected 
to the presidency for the fourth con- 
secutive year. Other officers elected 
were Sarah Morris, '25, secretary and 
treasurer; Kenneth Cole, '14, vice-pres- 
ident from Westchester County; Fred 
Rakeman, '18, vice-president from 
Long Island; James T. Knotts, '23, vice- 
president from New Jersey, and Ed 
Mullen, '33, reporter. 

Mr. Eugene Cibelli, tenor at St. Pat- 
rick's Cathedral, sang several numbers, 
among which were two compositions by 
Dr. Richard Paganelli of the Medical 



School class of 1904. A new Univer- 
sity of Maryland march, also written 
by Dr. Paganelli, was played for the 
first time. Mr. Cibelli was accompanied 
by his daughter. 

Dr. McCall Anderson, '08, was chair- 
man of the dinner committee. He was 
assisted by Grace Laeleger, '28, Dr. 
Richard Paganelli, William R. Maslin, 
'09, Edward Mullen, '33, and John 
Bourke, '35. 

All alumni in the metropolitan area 
are urged to communicate with Sarah 
Moiris at the Beaux Arts apartments, 
310 East 44th Street, so they may re- 
ceive notice of the forthcoming meet- 
ings of the group. Several parties at 
suburban country clubs are planned for 
the summer months and the luncheons 
will be continued at Planter's restau- 
rant, 124 Greenwich Street, on the sec- 
ond and fourth Wednesdays of the 
month at 12.30. 

Debaters Win 

The Calvert Debate Club carried off 
state honors in a tournament spon- 
sored by Station WCBM of Baltimore. 
On April 27, during a broadcast, the 
cup was presented to Messrs. Brown 
and Prettyman, the Maryland repre- 
sentatives in the contest. 

The tournament was conducted over 
a period of several weeks and each 
contest was broadcast. Maryland's 
opponents were Loyola University, 
Western Maryland College, and the 
University of Baltimore. The ques- 
tions were on National Labor Rela- 
tions Board, Minimum Wage and Max- 
imum Hour, and War Referendum. 



Reunion Of Engineers 

On Saturday, March 26, 1938, the 
Civil Engineering class of June '33 
held a reunion at Tilden Gardens Din- 
ing Room in Washington, D. C. Nine 
men out of the 18 in the class attend- 
ed. Those present were: Norman 
Belt, Robert Dunning, Charles Kitchen, 
Harold Norwood, Sam McGlathery, 
Stanley Shinn, Lewis Phillips, Parvin 
Starr and Howard M. Biggs. A good 
meal was enjoyed by all and it was 
followed by a bull-session in which 
each man was called upon to give a 
brief account of his work and expe- 
rience since leaving the University. 
Every one of the nine men were in 
some sort of employment in which 
his engineering education could be or 
was being used. The reunion was 
worked up on the spur of the moment 
and was given very little publicity. 
For those men who are away from 
town they are planning to have 
another get together in October or 
November, and they are anxious to get 
everyone of the 18 to attend. The 
meeting will be given sufficient pub- 
licity and each man will be informed. 
Please keep it in mind. 

• 
Married — Esther Hughes, '33, and 
James A. Lee, '31, took the big step 
on June 11. Esther is a member of 
Kappa Kappa Gamma and took fust 
honors in the College of Home Eco- 
nomics. Jimmie, the well known Terp 
lacrosse ace, is a member of Sigma 
Phi Sigma and a graduate in Mechani- 
cal Engineering with honors. He is 
now employed by the Washington Rail- 
way and Electric Company in Wash- 
ington. 



June, 1938 



Winners of Citizenship Awards 




Adcle Stamp, dean of women, presenting woman's 
citizenship prize, given by Mrs. Albert F. Woods to 
Ruth Virginia Lowry, of Baltimore. 



Harvey Casbarian, comptroller of the University, 
presenting men's citizenship, offered by President H. 
C. Byrd to Robert L. Walton. 



Over Seven Hundred Recieve 
Degrees At Commencement 



A T the one hundred and twenty-sixth 
commencement exercises held at 
College Park on Saturday, June 4, 780 
received degrees from Dr. H. C. Byrd, 
president of the University. Dr. Gil- 
bert H. Grosvenor, president, National 
Geographic Society, gave the principal 
address. Honorary degrees in Doctor 
of Letters were conferred upon the 
Honorable Frank B. Noyes and Dr. Gil- 
bert Grosvenor. Doctor of Engineering 
was conferred upon the Honorable 
Charles Hunter Locker. Honorary cer- 
tificates in Agriculture for meritorious 
contributions to the advancement of 
Agriculture were presented to Mr. Si- 
mond L. Downey, of Williamsport, Md., 
for livestock and dairying, Mr. Ralph 
Olin Dulany of Suitland, Md., for can- 
ning and fruit growing, and Mr. George 
I. Gardiner of Bryantown, Md., for to- 
bacco raising. 

Law Degrees 

During the awarding of the degrees 
in law, Dr. Byrd interrupted the usual 
procedure and stepped down from the 
platform and allowed W. Scott Beck of 



Chestertown, Md., former state sena- 
tor, who has been quite ill for more 
than a year, to present his son, Scott 
Beck, Jr., his diploma in law. The other 
law diplomas were presented by the 
Honorable Herbert R. O'Conor, Attor- 
ney General for Maryland. 

Following the exercises which were 
attended by more than 5,000 people, the 
graduating class, their families, rela- 
tives, and friends were guests of the 
University at a buffet luncheon served 
on the campus under the oak trees "On 
the Hill." 

Sons and Daughters of Grads 

Among those to receive degrees were 
several sons and daughters of alumni: 
in the College of Arts and Sciences, 
David Lewis Brigham, son of Reuben 
Brigham, '08, received his A.B. degree. 
Helen Jean Paterson, daughter of Dr. 
Alex Paterson, D.D.S., '05, received an 
A.B. degree and teacher's diploma. 
Mary Maxine White, daughter of F. M. 
White, '12, also received an A.B. de- 
gree and teacher's diploma. In the Col- 
lege of Home Economics, Elinor Court- 



ney Broughton, daughter of Dr. L. B. 
Broughton, '08, received a B.S. degree. 
Miss Broughton was also awarded the 
Service Award, in recognition of the 
growth and quality of her influence 
among women students at the Uni- 
versity. 

• 

Grads Receive 
Ph. D. Degrees 

Among the 17 doctor of philosophy 
degrees awarded, there were seven for- 
mer Old Line graduates — John Roberts 
Adams, '34, a specialist in chemistry 
and a member of Alpha Chi Sigma, 
honorary chemical fraternity; William 
A. Home, '34, a chemical specialist and 
member of Alpha Chi Sigma, also a 
member of Theta Chi, social fraterni- 
ty; Frank L. Howard, '34, of Hyatts- 
ville, another chemistry specialist and 
member of Alpha Chi Sigma; Robert 
A. Littleford, '33, a specialist in Agri- 
culture, who hails from Washington, 
D. C; and George F. Madigan, '30, one 
of Maryland's former outstanding ath- 
letes in football, basket-ball, who took 
an active interest in student affairs. 
He is a member of Alpha Chi Sigma 
and Alpha Zeta, honorary fraternities, 
Sigma Nu, social fraternity, and a spe- 
cialist in geology. 



8 Maryland Alumni News 



« OLD LINE ATHLETICS 



» » 



By W. H. ( "Bill") HOTTEL 



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V(/inners of Athletic Awards 




II 

■■H 

Dr. L. B. Broughton, dean of the College of Arts and Charles Linhardt, the donor and alumnus of the Uni- 
Scicnces, presenting Willicun C. Wolfe with the Sil- versity, presenting Coleman Headley of College Park 
vester watch for typifying the best in athletics during with ring offered for the outstanding athlete from 
his four years in college. within the State. 

• 9 

Terps Enjoy Big Year, Winning 67 Per Cent of Events; 

Lose 24 Stars But Retains Strong Nucleus In Every Pastime 

"l/TARYLAND'S VARSITY TEAMS Maryland also furnished a Southern McCarthy, football end and basketer. 

"*■ compiled an enviable record dur- Conference and National collegiate Frank Cronin, dash man and pole- 

ing the 1937-38 term, winning 67 per champion boxer in Benny Alperstein, yaulter, who has scored more points 

cent of their contests in the seven ma- 125-pounder, and captured three indoor for the Terps in track than any other 

l j l- J.T- tt ■ -i and six outdoor titles in Southern Con- ., u . , ,, u i r> i 

jor sports supported by the University m the history of the school; Parker 

— football, basket-ball, boxing, base- Lindsay, lacrosse attack man, and 

ball, track, lacrosse and tennis. Twenty-four of the athletes who pitchei . Lefty George Wood> will be 

„ . , . , , , . „„ j helped compile this great record for g . rea test one-man sport losses. 

Boxing, which was wi ecked by g. ad- thg ye&r ^ bg ^ Ammg th&m a ,. e ^ ^ ^ ^J ^ ^ ^ ^ 

nations in June, 1937, was Oie only Waverley wheeler, Coleman Headley various teams- 

pastime to finish in the "red." Here and BiU B t who won letters in 

are the records of the teams: f . ,. pp .„_.. am] spvpl . al who „. ained Football. Blan Smith, John McCai- 

thiee spoits, and seveial who gained th and Bin B t> ends; Bill Wolfe 

Sport Won Lost T,ed msig nia in two. Wheeler and Bryant d MJke gu d R b 

2SS5 14 8 o won theh ' " M " in baseball > f00tba11 and Walton, center; Waverley Wheeler and 

Boxing i 3 2 basket-ball, while Headley got his on Fyank DeArmey> backs> 

f seba " •■" " J J the track, gridiron and court. Basket-ball: Wheeler, McCarthy, 

Iennis !> 1 U » •>' 

Lacrosse 7 2 o Some Severe Losses and Coleman Headley. 

♦Track 5 n Mike Surgent and Bill Wolfe, the Boxing: William Johnson, 155 or 

great grid guards, the former also a 165; John Egan, 165 or 175; Ralph 

diamond ace and the latter a lacrosse Pearson, 175; Joe Henderson, heavy. 

* Dual mwts. star, will be sorely missed, as will John Baseball: George Wood, Bill Steiner 



June, L938 



Medical Alumni 
Meet In Boston 

Ir. Boston on Wednesday, June 1, 
Dr. Frank S. Lynn, '07. M.D., a prom- 
inent surgeon of Baltimore, was the 
guest speaker at a Medical Alumni 
meeting. He spoke on the University 
of Maryland, present and future. 
More than 50 alumri from various 
parts of the New England states 
attended the meeting, which was held 
in conjunction with the Massachusetts 
Medical Society. 

In his talk Dr. Lynn covered the 
development of the University sir.ce 
its amalgamation in 1920 and the 
extensive plans now in progress. This 
talk was supplemented by lantern slid: 1 
pictures, a new picture of the proposed 
development, and a prospectus of the 
present university and the student 
activities. As many of the alumni 
were graduated prior to 1920, they 
were amazed and greatly pleased with 
the progress being made by their Alma 
Mater. 

• 

Birth— Mr. and Mrs. John B. West, 
Jr., announce the birth of a son, John 
B. Ill, born April 28. Mrs. West was 
formerly Gertrude Gilbertson, and a 
graduate in Home Economics. 



Rowe Opens New 
Veterinary Hospital 

On Thursday, May 26, Dr. Taylor 
P. Rowe, '24, a prominent veterinarian 
of Richmond, Va., held the formal 
opening of his new Broad Street 
Veterinary Hospital. 

The hospital has all modern equip- 
ment for the treatment and cave of 
small animals. A dog can be cared 
for in every way from clipping to 
surgery. 

Dr. Rowe was well known by his 
classmates and teammates as "Massa." 
In lacrosse, he was a star and won 
membership in the "M" Club by his 
meritorious performance. 

Grad In Optometry 

At the commencement exercises of 
the Pennsylvania State College of 
Optometry in Philadelphia, E. Arthur 
Newman, '35, received the degree of 
Doctor in Optometry. In completing 
the prescribed courses, Dr. Newman 
served as clinical assistant in the Col- 
lege Clinic, where more than 16,000 
are treated annually. The Pennsyl- 
vania State College of Optometry is 
one of the outstanding institutions 
in the field of optometrical education 
and training. 



and Kyle Ruble, pitchers; Wheeler, 
third base; Surgent and Bryant, out- 
fielders. 

Track: Frank Cronin, dashes, relay 
and pole-vault; Headley, 880, mile and 
relay; Bill Thies, 440 and relay; Logan 
Schutz, hurdles. 

Lacrosse: Parker Lindsay, Bill Groff 
and George Watson and Harvey Cooke, 
attack; Bill Wolfe, defense. 

Tennis: Ted Lehmann, No. 3 singles 
and doubles player. 

Many Stars Remain 

Despite the heavy losses, Maryland 
has a lot of good men left in the va- 
rious sports and should be up to the 
standard in most all of the pastimes 
during 1938-39. Here are the letter 
men who remain and these, of course, 
will be augmented by some frosh tal- 
ent of ability: 

Football: Nick Budkoff, end; Ralph 
Albarano and Bob Brown, tackles; Jim 
Forrester, center; Jim Meade, Charlie 
Weidinger, John Boyda, Frank Scot- 
nicki, Pershing Mondorff, Rip Hewitt 
and Bob Brand, backs. 

Basket-ball: Eddie Johnson and 
Francis Beamer, forward or center; 
Bill Rea and Adam Begoechea, for- 



ward; George Knepley, Milton Mulitz 
and Pershing Mondorff, guards. 

Boxing: George Dorr, 115; Martin 
Rochlin, 115; Benny Alperstein, 125 or 
135; Nathan Askin, 135; Bob Bradley, 
125 or 135; Jose DePeralta, 145; New- 
ton Cox, 155 or 165. 

Baseball: Bill Silverman and Earl 
Springer, pitchers; Joe Crisafulli and 
Bob Burns, catchers; George Knepley, 
first base; Eddie Johnson, second base; 
Angelos Chumbris, shortstop; Pershing 
Mondorff, pitcher or infielder; Cleom 
Chumbris and Hugh Keller, outfielders. 

Track: Alan Miller, 220 and 440; 
Edwin Miller, hurdles and high jump; 
Halbert Evans, hurdles; James Kehoe, 
880, mile and two miles; Mason Chron- 
ister, mile; Joe Peaslee, two miles; 
Francis Kenney, broad jump; Charle- 
Morris, shot and discuss; Francis Mor- 
ris, high jump and broad jump. 

Lacrosse: Haskin Deeley, goal; Bill 
Grahan, Leo Mueller, George Heil, Jim 
Meade and Milton Mulitz, defense; 
Fred Hewitt, Bob Neilson, Oscar Ne- 
vares, Bill Bond and Bill Cole, attack. 

Tennis: Nathan Askin, Allie Ritzen- 
beig, Mack Dunie, Lawrence Lichliter, 
Jay Phillips and Harvey Kreuzburg. 



ATHLETIC NOTES 

Bob Neilson, called the most danger- 
ous attack man of the season, at out 
home, and Parker Lindsay, second at- 
tack, rated just about as highly as a 
midfielder, were picked for the official 
first all-America lacrosse ten by the 
committee from National Association. 
Milton Mulitz, dsfense, and George 
Watson, first attack, were rated aces 
of the second team. 

All four of these were on the all- 
State first combination. 
□ 
Blair Smith, end; Bill Wolfe and 
Mike Surgent, guards, were chosen to 
play on the college all-star football 
team that will meet the Philadelphia 
Eagles in the Quaker City late in Au- 
gust. Only athletes who were in the 
graduating class were selected, as oth- 
erwise it might impair their college 
athletic status. 

□ 
George Wood, left-handed pitcher, 
who was in the 1938 graduating class, 
had his name inscribed on the Bozie 
Berger cup for the baseball player who 
did most for his team during the season. 
□ 
Navy's 8-7 lacrosse victory over 
Maryland that edged the Terps out of 
the national title after -two years at 
the top was the first the Middies had 
scored in nine years. Maryland had 
won seven of eight games and one end- 
ed in a 6-6 tie after two extra periods. 
Maryland now has four straight over 
Hopkins and three in a row over St. 
John's. 

□ 
Maryland's tennis team, with 9 wins 
in 10 matches, as far as is known, made 
the greatest record of any net outfit 
in the history of sport at College Park. 
□ 
Two track stars who were lost to 
Maryland hung up school records in 
their final appearance for the Univer- 
sity. Coleman Headley ran the 880 in 
1:53.3 and Frank Cronin sped the 440 
in 48.3 to win Southern Conference ti- 
tles at Durham. Headley's time also 
was a new Conference mark. 
• 
Spencer Chase Marries 
Spencer Chase, former Maryland 
baseball and basket-ball star, who was 
graduated in the class of '34, was mar- 
ried on June 18 to Gertrude Donnella 
of Washington. Chase now is working 
in the Horticultural Department of the 
University. He also has become a bas- 
ket-ball official of note and is kept busy 
calling 'em during the season. 



Maryland Alumni News 



Home Economics' 
Annual Mothers Day 

The College of Home Economics ob- 
served its annual Mothers Day cele- 
bration on Friday, May 20. Over 250 
guests were in attendance. 

A program on Consumer Education 
was conducted by Miss Mary E Kirk- 
patrick, professor of Foods of the Col- 
lege of Home Economics. Three au- 
thorities in this field spoke on subjects 
pertaining to consumer problems. Mrs. 
Mathilda C. Hader, former instructor 
and lecturer on education at New York 
University and who is at present a 
member of the executive committee of 
the Washington Consumer Club, spoke 
on the subject of "Know Your Buying 
Power." Mr. Kenneth Warner, of the 
Department of Animal Industry in the 
Department of Agriculture discussed 
"Selection of Meat for the Home." 
Last on this program was a talk by 
Dr. Polly Bell Kessinger on "Label- 
ling Textile Commodities." Dr. Kes- 
singer is on the Textile and Clothing 
staff of the College of Home Eco- 
nomics. 

Fashion Show 

Following this was a fashion show T 
which was in charge of Mrs. Frieda 
McFarland, head of Textiles, Clothing 
and Art. The students of the clothing 
department modeled the latest spring 
fashions which had been designed and 
made during the last semester. 

Luncheon was served in the College 
dining hall directly after the review. 

The afternoon program continued in 
the Home Economics building. Special 
demonstrations were given by all de- 
partments of the College. 

Demonstrations 

Miss Doris Dunnington, of the Tex- 
tiles and Clothing division, gave a 
series of three demonstrations in which 
she demonstrated textile testing, both 
technical and non-technical; recent 
finishes in textiles, and discussed in- 
teresting innovations in the field of 
synthetic textile fibers. 

Misses Ruth Knight, Elinor Brough- 
ton and Bell McGinnis, of the Clothing 
Department, gave three demonstra- 
tions on draping and dress design, 
illustrating the art of designing 
dresses without the aid of patterns. 
Cooking and Dietetics 
The Foods and Nutrition departments 
gave a number of interesting demon- 
strations. Under the direction of Miss 
Mary E. Kirkpatrick, Miss Jane Crow 
showed the effects of varying amounts 
of baking powder in plain cakes. Miss 



Elsie Jones demonstrated the Nesco 
electric roaster, while the sophomore 
girls illustrated the correct settings 
for semi-formal teas and formal lunch- 
eons. Under the direction of Mrs. 
Claribel Welsh and Miss Mary Emma 
Barnes was a dietary exhibit, pre- 
pared by the junior girls of the Food 
and Nutrition department. The ex- 
hibits consisted of dietaries that would 
be used in an average family group, 
such as diet for the adolescent boy; 
the adult man and woman; overweight, 
underweight, and for the aged. 

Members of the Home Economics 
Club acted as guides and hostesses 
throughout the day. 



Personal Pencilings 



Birth— Mr. and Mrs. Eben Jenkins 
announce the arrival of Sarah Jean, 
weighing 8 pounds and three ounces. 
Mrs. Jenkins was formerly Mary In- 
gersoll, '30, and a member of Kappa 
Kappa Gamma. The Jenkins live in 
Hyattsville. 

□ 

Birth— Mr. and Mrs. 0. R. Carring- 
ton have a son, David Kent, who ar- 
rived April 10, weighing 7 pounds. Mrs. 
Carrington was formerly Mildred His- 
lop of '29, and Mr. Carrington, better 
known as Ray, was in the class of '28. 
Ray is employed in the Extension Serv- 
ice of the University, where he is doing 
journalist and art work. Hyattsville is 
the home of the Carringtons. 
D 

Physician — Robert ("Bob") Havell, 
'31, received his M.D. from George 
Washington in 1935, after which he did 
his interne work at Georgetown Uni- 
versity. In January, '38, he opened his 
offices at 5516 Nebraska Avenue for 
general practice of medicine. "Bob" 
was a member of Kappa Alpha and a 
member of the Terp track squad. 
□ 

Romance In '38 — At the senior ban- 
quet several interesting bits of news 
were heard. Muriel James, while pre- 
senting a novelty favor from the senior 
class to Dorothy Hobbs, which hap- 
pened to be a toy baby carriage, said, 
"Hurry up and use it, 'Dot', so I can 
borrow it." "Dot" is to marry Dick 
Maurer and Muriel is to wed Bud Wahl. 
At another table, it was heard that 
Eileen Kellerman is engaged. 
□ 

Our charming queen of the May, 
Jean Paterson, is sporting a naval acad- 
emy ring, which means she belongs to 
the Navy. 



Teachers — Garvis G. Shugart, '28, 
has been elected president of the 
Prince George's County High School 
Teachers Association. Shugart is prin- 
cipal of the Upper Marlboro High 
School. He received his M. S. from 
Maryland in 1933 through attending 
the Summer Schools. 
D 

Dr. Paul Lewis Fisher, '29, Ph.D., 
'34, formerly plant physiologist of the 
U. S. Department of Agriculture at 
Washington, D. C, will head the new 
department of agriculture in the River- 
side Junior College. He is a graduate 
of the University of Maryland. 
n 

Russell Daiker, '34, has been in Okla- 
homa since August, 1934, in the em- 
ploy of the Federal Government. He 
is now associated with the Oklahoma 
State Highway Commission. 
□ 

Finance — Chester W. Tawney, '30, 
former president of the Baltimore 
alumni group, has been transferred to 
Brookeline, Mass., where he is man- 
ager of that office for the Household 
Finance Corporation. 
□ 

Chemist — John A. Yourtree, '33, is 
a research chemist at the Sylvania 
Industrial Corporation of Fredericks- 
burg, Va. 

□ 

X-Ray — A native of Laurel, Md., 
Florence Hill, '37, helps the home- 
town physicians and fellow alumni, Dr. 
B. P. Warren, '24, M. D., and Dr. J. 
M. Warren, '35, M D., as x-ray and 
laboratory technician. 
D 

Engineer — Safety engineer for the 
Maryland Casualty Company, of Bal- 
timore, is Richard W. Baldwin, '34. 
□ 

Hotels — Assistant manager for the 
Hotel Collingwood of New York is 
John J. Bourke, '35. John is an active 
member of the New York alumni 
group. He was a member of the enter- 
tainment committee of the recent 
spring dinner. 

D 

Trade— William S. Hill, Jr., '29, can 
be found with the Federal Trade Com- 
mission in Washington, D. C. 
□ 

Gas — The Washington Gas Light 
Company has the services of Isabel 
Dynes, '30, in the Home Service De- 
partment. 

D 

Florida — The Circuit Judge of Tam- 
pa, Florida, is Harry H. Sandler, '09. 
□ 

Ministry — Rev. Robert C. Simmons, 
'29, is the rector of a church in Rich- 
mond Hill, N. Y. 



June, 1938 11 



Some Who Received Honors for 1937-38 » » » 

Citizenship Prize, offered by President H. C. Byrd, Class of 1908, to the member of the senior class, who doing his colle- 
giate career, has nearest typified the model citizen and who has done most for the general advancement of the inter- 
ests of the University. 

Awarded to Robert Lucius Walton 

Citizenship Prize, offered by Mrs. Albert F. Woods, to the woman member of the senior class who, during her collegiate 
career, has nearest typified the model citizen and has done most for the general advancement of women's interests 
at the University. 

Awarded to Ruth Virginia Lowry 

Silvester Medal for Excellence in Athletics, offered by the Class of 1908, to the man who typifies the best in college athletics. 

Awarded to William Caroal Wolfe 

Maryland Ring, offered by Charles L. Linhardt, '12, to the Maryland man outstanding for the year in athletics. 

Awarded to Lawrence Coleman Headley 

Mortar Board Cup, offered to the woman member of the senior class who has been in attendance at least three full years 
and who has made the highest scholastic average. 

Awarded to Shirley Florence Danforth 

James Douglas Goddard Memorial Medal, offered by his sister, Mrs. Anna K. Goddard James to a student from Prince 
George's County for excellence in scholarship and moral character. 

Awarded to Edward Martin Wharton 

Student Medal and Junior Membership, offered by the American Institute of Chemists to the member of the senior class 
who has attained the highest average in chemistry. 

Awarded to Julian Keith Lawson, Jr. 

Sigma Phi Sigma Medal, offered by the Delta Chapter to the freshman who makes the highest scholastic average during 
the first semester. 

Awarded to John Chesley Marzolf 

Delta Delta Delta Sorority Medal, offered to the sophomore girl who makes the highest scholastic average during the first 
semester. 

Awarded to Frances Jane Stouffer 

The Dinah Berman Memorial Medal, offered by her son, Benjamin Berman, to that sophomore who has attained the high- 
est scholastic average of his class in the College of Engineering. 

Awarded to Joseph Mossler Marzolf, Jr. 

Honor Key, offered by the Class of 1926 of the School of Business Administration of the University of Maryland at Balti- 
more, to the senior student graduating in business administration with the highest average for the entire four year 
course taken at the University of Maryland. 

Awarded to Charles H. Beebe, Jr. 

Omicron Nu Sorority Meda , offered to the freshman girl who makes the highest scholastic average during the first semester. 

Awarded to Dorothy Mae Green 

Service Award, in recognition of the growth and quality of her influence among women students. 

Awarded to Elinor Courtney Broughton 

Governor's Cup to the best drilled company. 

Awarded to Company M, commanded by Cadet Captain Edwin Dennett Long, Jr. 

The Reserve Officers' Association Auard to the commander of the winning company. 

Awarded to Cadet Captain Edwin Dennett Long, Jr. 

The Alumni Cup, offered to the best drilled platoon. 

Awarded to ... . Second Platoon, Company E, commanded by Cadet First Lieutenant Perry Irving Hay 

Gold Medal to Individual Winning Mehring Trophy Rifle Competition. 

Awarded to Cadet George Everett Meeks 

University Prize Gold Medal — Medicine. 

Awarded to Stanley Edward Bradley 

University Gold Medal for Scholarship — Dentistry. 

Awarded to Eugene Davisson Lyon 

Alumni Prize for the best argument in the Honor Case in the Practice Court — Law. 

Awarded to John Herbert Barrett, Jr. 

Gold Medal for General Excellence in Pharmacy. 

Awarded to George Philip Hager 

The Janet Hale Memorial Scholarship, given by the University of Maryland Nurses' Alumnae Association, to pursue a 
course in administration, supervisory, or public health work at Teachers' College, Columbia University, to the 
student having the highest average in scholarship — Nursing. 

Awarded to Ingrid Elizabeth Selkamaa 






* • 




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for a lifetime of I 
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Copyright 1938, Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. 





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Volume X 



MARYLAND ALUMNI NEWS, JULY, 1938 



Number 2 



Alumni Association-University of Maryland 

Founded in 1892 

♦ 

Officers for 1938-39 

C. WALTER COLE, '21, President 

Towson, Md. 

Charles W. Sylvester, '08, Vice-President G. F. Pollock, '23, Sec-Treasurer 

Baltimore, Md. College Park, Md. 

Alumni Board 

(Note — The officers named above are also members of the Alumni Board) 
Reuben Brigham, '08, P. W. Chichester, '20, Education 

Arts and Sciences John A. Silkman, '35, Agriculture 

Charles V. Koons, '29, Engineering Ruth Miles, '31, Home Economics 

Members at Large 

Esther Hughes Lee, '33, Women's Rep. J. Donald Kieffer, '30, Men's Rep. 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Editor 

Maryland Alumni News, issued monthly by the University of Maryland 
Alumni Association at College Park, Md., as second-class matter under the Act 
of Congress of March 3, 1879. 

Annual Alumni Association dues are $2.00. One year's subscription to 
Alumni News, 50 cents. 

Group Leaders 

Allegany County: E. Brooke Whiting, '98, President; Dr. Joseph Franklin, '21, Secretary, Cum- 
berland, Md. 

Baltimore County: C. Walter Cole, '21, President; H. B. Derrick, '17, Secretary, Towson, Md. 

Baltimore City: Chester Tawney. '31, President, 4022 Roland Avenue; E. Gordon Hammond, '34, 
Secretary, 1023 W. Barre Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Caroline County: George W. Clendaniel, '20, President, Denton; Dr. Maurice A. Brackett, '21, 
Treasurer, Denton ; Mrs. George W. Clendaniel, '21, Secretary, Denton. 

Harford County: W. B. Munnikhuysen, '14, President; H. M. Carroll, '20, Secretary, Bel Air, Md. 

Frederick County: J. Homer Remsberg, '18, President; Henry R. Shoemaker, '17, Secretary. 
Frederick, Md. 

Montgomery County: Lawrence G. Smoot, '18, President, Kensington, Md. ; Mary Fisher, '36, 
Secretary, Rockville, Md. 

New York City: Donald Kieffer, '30, President, 195 Broadway; Sarah Morris, '25, Secretary, 
140 E. 63rd Street, New York City. 

Philadelphia: A. Moulton MeNutt, '06, President, 413 Cooper Street, Camden, N. J.; J. P. Mudd, 
'07, Secretary, 173 Manheim Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pittsburg: E. Minor Wenner, '27. President, 1111 Gladys Avenue; Dr. A. A. Krieger, '32, Sec- 
retary. Highland Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Washington, D. C. : J. Douglas Wallop. '19. President, 6139 N. Dakota Avenue, N. W. ; C. Vincent 
Koons, '29, Secretary, 419 Fourth Street, N. E., Washington. 

Washington County: Hon. Henry Holzapfel, Jr., '93, President, Hagerstown, Md. ; L. G. Mathias, 
'23, Secretary, Hagerstown, Md. 

"M" Club Officers and Board Members 



President — Dr. A. A. Parker, '04. 
Vice-President — Donald H. Adams, 



Secretary-Treas.— Dr. E. N. Cory, '09. 
Historian— Bob Hill, '26. 



Representatives 



Baseball- G. F. Pollock, '23. 
Basket-ball— H. B. Shipley, '14. 
Boxing — Victor Wingate, '35. 
Lacrosse — James Stevens, '19. 
Track— Lewis W. Thomas, '28. 



Tennis — James Shumate, '17. 
Cross Co. — Charles Remsberg, '26. 
Football— Kirk Besley, '23. 
At Large — Dr. E. B. Friedenwald, '03. 
Dr. A. W. Valentine, '04. 



Cover Picture 

Every student who has attended the 
College Park school from its very be- 
ginning nearly a century ago, has at 
some time approached the "campus on 
the hill" thru these trees. At one 
time the approach thru the trees was 
a vehicular road-way, and now it is 
a beautiful pedestrian walk. Daily 
more than 1,200 people traverse this 
part of the landscape going to and 
from the campus. This walk begins 
at the main entrance on the Boulevard 
at College Avenue. 
• 

Degrees On 
The Wing 

Somehow this item unintentionally 
missed the June issue of the "News." 

Degrees on the wing seems to be the 
new order of the day for President 
Byrd. Both Dickinson College, at Car- 
lyle, Pa., and Western Maryland Col- 
lege at Westminster, Md., wanted to 
confer honorary degrees upon our 
president on the same day, and during 
the forenoon. To accomplish this it 
was necessary to use aeroplane travel. 
Starting from the convenient and well- 
known airport at College Park with an 
experienced pilot at the controls, Presi- 
dent Byrd flew to Carlyle, where he re- 
ceived the honorary degree of Doctor 
of Laws. Leaving immediately follow- 
ing the exercises he flew to Westmin- 
ster and received the honorary degree 
of Doctor of Science. He returned to 
College Park early enough in the after- 
noon to take care of several important 
matters requiring his immediate at- 
tention. The progress of travel march- 
es on. 

• 

Hines, '00, Promoted 

A recent announcement from the 
Maryland National guard headquarters 
gave the promotion of Major Frank 
B. Hines to that of Lieutenant Colonel. 
Colonel Hines is commander of the 
Medical Detachment of the First 
Maryland Infantry. 

Colonel Hines is a prominent physi- 
cian on the Eastern Shore, and is a 
former president of the Alumni Asso- 
ciation. He resides in Chestertown, 
Maryland. 



Maryland Alumni News 



Tydings -Gambrill -Cole Seek Reelection to Congress 




Hon. Stephen W. Gambrill 



Hon. Millard E. Tydings 



Hon. William P. Cole, Jr. 



THREE OF OUR EMINENT ALUMNI are candidates for reelec- 
tions to national offices in the United States Government this fall. 
They have faithfully served the people of Maryland for many years, 
and have been conscientious public servants. 



Senator Tydings 

For the senior office, the Hon. Mil- 
lard E. Tydings, a member of the class 
of 1910, seeks reelection as the United 
States Senator from Maryland. He is 
a native of Maryland, who was born 
in Harford County and spent his boy- 
hood in the same vicinity. Following 
his graduation from the College Park 
schools of the University in 1910, he 
entered the University Law School in 
Baltimore and received his LL. D. de- 
gree in 1913. He was admitted to the 
Maryland Bar in the same year and 
immediately began the practice of law 
in Havre de Grace. His first political 
office of note was his election as a 
member of the House of Delegates in 
1916. In 1920 he became speaker of 
the House, and during his tenure as 
speaker introduced the bill which 
amalgamated the two branches of the 
state institutions and formed the pres- 
ent University of Maryland. Then, 
during 1922, he became State Senator 
from Harford County. He entered 
United States Congress in 1923 as 
Representative from the Second Dis- 
trict of Maryland, and in 1927 his 
meritorious service and sound think- 
ing won for him election to Uncle 



Sam's higher legislative body — the 
United States Senate. He was reelected 
to the Senate in 1932 by the largest 
majority any candidate has ever re- 
ceived in Maryland. 

Soldier. Scholar. Statesman 

Senator Tydings is a scholar, soldier, 
and statesman. His military record is 
pointed to with pride. He entered the 
army as a private in 1916 and served 
on the Mexican border. He went to 
France as a lieutenant and returned 
as a lieutenant-colonel. He was in 
three major engagements and won 
several citations, which included the 
D. S. M. and the D. S. C. He is a mem- 
ber of the American Legion, the 
Masons and the Elks. 

President of Alumni 

His fellow alumni familiarly call 
him "Chief," and his classmates re- 
member him as a leader in student 
and athletic activities in college. No 
alumnus takes a keener interest in the 
"Old School" than does "Chief" Ty- 
dings. He is a familiar figure at ath- 
letic contests, and has missed but few 
alumni gatherings. He served his fel- 
low alumni as president of the asso- 
ciation on two occasions. Senator 



Tydings is a Democrat and resides in 
Harford County. 

Congressman Gambrill 

The Hon. Stephen W. Gambrill, 
United States Congressman from the 
Fifth District of Maryland since 1925 
when he was appointed to fill the un- 
expired term of the late Hon. Sydney 
E. Mudd, seeks reelection this fall. 
He was born and raised in Maryland, 
graduating with an A. B. degree in a 
classical course at the College Park 
schools of the University in 1892. In 
1897 he was admitted to the Maryland 
Bar after completing a law course at 
Columbia University in Washington, 
D. C. He then began the practice of 
law in Baltimore and developed quite 
an interest in politics. In 1920 he was 
elected to the Maryland House of Dele- 
gates, and in 1924 was elected to the 
State Senate. 

Aids Tidewater Area 

In the United States Congress he 
has been primarily interested and ac- 
tive on river and harbor improvements 
in the tidewaters of the Fifth Con- 
gressional District, including the Ches- 
apeake Bay, the Potomac River, and 
their tributaries. His efforts as a mem- 
ber of the River and Harbor Commis- 
sion have secured the expenditure of 
nearly $300,000 for the benefit of the 
public of Maryland, and especially 
those whose livelihood is derived from 
the waters of Maryland. He had a part 
in obtaining an appropriation of $300, 






July, 1938 



000 for the Maryland Park and Plan- 
ning Commission for extending; the 
park system of the National Capitol 
into Prince George County, Md. He 
has also sponsored and assisted in 
obtaining government appropriations 
for many improvements of special 
benefit to Maryland. Congressman 
Gambrill is a Democrat and resides at 
Laurel, Md. 

Congressman Cole 

Another former president of the 
University of Maryland Alumni Asso- 
ciation, the Hon. William P. Cole, Jr., 
class of '10, is a Democratic candidate 
for reelection as United States Con- 
gressman from the Second District of 
Maryland. A product of Baltimore 
County, Congressman Cole was born 
and laised in Towson, Md., where the 
name Cole has been like a pillar in 
traditions of the county. 

Entered Congress 1926 

Following his graduation from the 
College Park schools, he entered the 
University law school in Baltimore. In 
1912 he was admitted to the Maryland 
Bar; he immediately began the prac- 
tice of law in his home town and be- 
came one of the leading members of 
the profession. After having served in 



several public offices in his county, he 
became a candidate in 1924 for the 
State Legislature and was elected as 
Senator. Two years later he was a 
candidate for the United States Con- 
gress, and was elected in 1926. He was, 
however, defeated in the Republican 
landslide in 1928. Again he became a 
candidate in 1930 and was elected by a 
large majority and has since been 
consistently reelected. 

Veteran of World War 

He is a soldier as well as a states- 
man, having served in the World War 
as a first lieutenant and later was pro- 
moted to captain. Congressman Cole 
is one of Maryland's distinguished 
graduates, who is familiarly known to 
his fellow alumni as "Bill." His in- 
terest in the University has been un- 
tiring and helpful. In addition to the 
many prominent offices he has held in 
his life, the late Hon. Albert C. Ritchie, 
Governor of Maryland, appointed him 
to the Board of Regents of his Alma 
Mater in 1931. 

Congressman Cole's service in the 
interest of the people of Maryland has 
been laudatory in every way, for he 
has undertaken only those things in 
which are embodied the highest ideals, 
and are for the best interest of the 
people. 



Law Graduates Gubernatorial Candidates 



Two alumni of the University's 
School of Law are in the Gubernatorial 
race of Maryland. His Excellency 
Harry W. Nice, '98, Governor of Mary- 
land, is a candidate for reelection on 
the Republican ticket. He has had 
many accomplishments during his ten- 
ure of office and has taken an active 
interest in the progress of the Uni- 
versity. 

Governor Nice is a prominent mem- 
ber of American, Maryland, and Balti- 
more City Bar. He has served the 
public in numerous other public offices. 
He is a member of the Shrine and 
several other fraternal orders as well 
as many clubs. He has a great ability 
for developing friendship and good 
fellowship. 

Attorney General O'Connor 
Our Attorney General Herbert R. 
O'Connor, '20, LL. B., has practiced 
law in Baltimore ever since he gradu- 
ated and became one of the outstand- 
ing members of the Bar. His first 
connection with governmental affairs 
was when he served as Assistant 
States Attorney for Baltimore City 



and later as State Attorney. He has 
served as the Peoples Counsel to the 
Public Service Commissions. In 1934 
he was elected as Attorney General 
for Maryland. 

Mr. O'Connor is a member of the 
American, State, and City Bar. He has 
taken active interest in the civic 
affairs of Baltimore and the Law 
School of the University. He belongs 
to several fraternal orders and a num- 
ber of clubs. He is a Democrat and a 
resident of Balitmore City. 
• 

Electric — From among the "15ers" 
we have Hedley A. Clark as assistant 
to the superintendent of Electrical 
Distribution Department of the Con- 
solidated Gas & Electric Power Com- 
pany, of Baltimore. He is married and 
has a boy and a girl. At least another 
half back in a few years. 
• 

Government — Ralph I. Evans, '36, a 
grad in business administration, en- 
tered the Bureau of Internal Revenue 
as a "claims and correspondence clerk" 
in the Bituminous Coal and Silver Tax 
Division. 



Dr. Blake, '93, 
Heads Medical Alumni 

The guest speaker at the Annual 
Medical Alumni Banquet held at the 
Lord Baltimore Hotel on June 2, 1938, 
was Dr. W. Wayne Babcock, professor 
of surgery at Temple University, 
Philadelphia. Doctor Babcock's class 
of 1893 held its 45th reunion this year. 

Another graduate of the class of 
1893 is the new president of the Medi- 
cal Alumni Association, Dr. Charles 
F. Blake, who is a member of the 
faculty of the University's School of 
Medicine. 

Among those who traveled quite a 
distance to attend class reunions were 
the following: Dr. Joseph G. Evans, 
'03, San Pedro, Calif.; Dr. Samuel J. 
King, '03, St. Louis, Mo.; Dr. Lewis W. 
Glatzau, '16, Daytona Beach, Fla.; Dr. 
Frederick W. Mayer, '03, St. Paul, 
Minn.; Dr. Frank H. Cutler, '03, Salt 
Lake City, Utah; Dr. M. E. Hagerty, 
'08, St. Louis, Mo.; Dr. A. W. Erskine, 
'08, Cedar Rapids, Iowa; Dr. Rolin 
Jefferson, '03, Tampa, Fla. 

Dr. William H. Marsh of Solomons, 
Md., a member of the class of 1876, 
was the oldest alumnus present. 
Officers for the ensuing year were 
elected as follows: President — Dr. 
Charles F. Blake, '93; Vice-Presidents 
— Brig. Gen. Roger Brooke, M. C, U. 
S. A., '00, Dr. Robert Lee Hall, '01, Dr. 
Edward W. Sprague, '03; Secretary — ■ 
Dr. Frank K. Morris, '27; Assistant 
Secretary, Dr. Francis W. Gillis, '27; 
Treasurer — Dr. D. J. Pessagno, '20, 
and the Board of Directors — Dr. Ar- 
thur Hebb, '98, Dr. Alfred Gundry, '94, 
Dr. Edgar Friedenwald, '03, Dr. Ken- 
neth B. Boyd, '24, Dr. Thomas O'- 
Rouke, '21. 

Crooks, '23, In Europe 

Coincidences are happening every 
day! Just recently a letter arrived on 
the desk of the Director of Admissions 
from a former student whose address 
has been unknown for some 12 years. 
The envelope carried a foreign stamp 
and the letter head, while in English, 
had several foreign insignias. The 
letter was from the Belgian headquar- 
ters of the General Motors and the 
signer of the letter was W. S. Crooks, 
'23, writing for information about a 
boy who wishes to enter the University 
of Maryland. Crooks has been in 
Europe for the past 12 years as an 
official of considerable prestige for 
General Motors. His address is 192 
Bassin Albert, Anvers, Belgique. 



Maryland Alumni News 



Army Band Leader Receives Maryland March 




Dr. T. Richard Paganelli, '03, well known opthalmologist, presents his 
composition of a "University of Maryland March" to Mr. Edward Wallnau, 
official West Point cadet host in New York, in the West Point Cadet Lounge at 
the Hotel Piccadilly. 



Nurses Hold Annual 
Banquet And Dance 

The Nurses' Alumnae Banquet and 
Dance, in honor of the class of 1938, 
was held on Thursday, June 2, in the 
Club House of the Maryland Casualty 
Company in Baltimore. The Club 
House is ideally located on beautiful 
landscaped grounds, and has all the 
advantages of a large country estate. 

Miss Nannie J. Lockland, '98, cele- 
brating her 40th anniversary, was an 
honored guest. She was a member of 
the committee that composed the origi- 
nal constitution and by-laws of the 
Nurses' Alumnae organization. Other 
guests were: Dr. H. C. Byrd, presi- 
dent of the University; Dr. A. J. 
Lomas, superintendent of the Univer- 
sity Hospital; Miss Annie Crighton, 
superintendent of Nurses. Mr. C. De- 
lano Ames, president of the Criminal 
Justice Commission, was the speaker 
of the evening, and was introduced by 
Dr. Lomas. A most interesting talk 
was given on Crime Prevention. 

Miss Crighton announced the prize 
winners in the class of 1938. They 
were: Miss Ingred Elizabeth Sel- 
kamaa, Miss Alice Virginia Garrison, 
Miss Gwendolyn Haugh, and Miss 
Sara Jane Mays. 



Summer School Large 

When Summer School opened it 
looked like a September registration. 
More than 1,260 teachers, students, 
and graduates enrolled for the summer 
classes on the first day. More came on 
the second and third days until now 
the largest summer session in the his- 
tory of the University is under way 
with approximately 1,400 registrations. 

In addition to the regular summer 
crowd there are approximately 100 
vocational educational advisors from 
the 3rd Corps of the C. C. C. camps en- 
rolled at College Park for a two week 
session. This group is under the super- 
vision of Earl Zulick, '28, educational 
advisor for the area. As a supplement 
to the session, a special exhibit of 
vocational accomplishments is on dis- 
play in the Ritchie Coliseum. This 
display has quite a variety in art, 
pottery, mechanics, cabinet making, 
etc., which is exceedingly attractive 
and well done. 

With the numerous organizations 
coming to the University campus, plus 
the regular session, there is only about 
two weeks out of every year when the 
campus is not in use. 

It is a University of and for the 
people. 



Pharmacy Alumni Elect 
Getz, '13, President 

At the annual banquet and meeting 
of the Pharmacy School Alumni Asso- 
ciation held during the commencement 
week activities, Dr. David B. Getz, '13, 
prominent citizen of Bel Air, Md., was 
lected president for the ensuing year. 
Retiring President John A. Strevig, 
'12, presided at the meeting. Dr. Frank 
L. Black, chairman of the Nominating 
C ommittee, presented the other nomi- 
nses for 1938-39. 

Honorary President — Dr. Purnell F. 
Sappington, '84, M.D. '87, a physi- 
cian at Bel Air. 

First Vice-President — Charles S. 
Austin, Jr., '16. 

Second Vice-President — T. Ellsworth 
Ragland, '11. 

Secretary— B. Olive Cole, '13, LL.B., 
'23. 

Treasurer — Mrs. Frank M. Budacz, 
'26. 

Executive Committee (elected mem- 
bers) — Jacob H. Greenfield, '29; 
Otto W. Meuhlause, '13; John H. 
Strevig, '12, and John F. Wannen- 
wetsch, '13. 

Cf particular mention was the pres- 
ence of Mr. Paul C. E. Hauser of the 
class of 1888 and Mr. F. W. Dickson 
of the class of 1889. Graduates of 25 
years ago — the class of 1913 — were 
seated at a special table. Dr. Otto W. 
Muehlhause, spokesman for the group, 
recounted the many advances made in 
pharmacy during the last quarter- 
C2ntury. Other members of '13 pres- 
ent included B. Olive Cole, David B. 
Getz (president-elect), Albert E. 
Hammel, Herman F. Hansen, John J. 
O'Hara, Harry M. Rolnick, Harry L. 
Schrader, Amelia S. Sonnenberg and 
John F. Wannenwetsch. Three genera- 
tions of pharmacists in the Wich fami- 
ly, Conrad L. Wich, '82, Henry E. Wich, 
'09, and J. Carlton Wich, '38, were 
seated at a special table. 

The elder Wich spoke and expressed 
happiness that his group could attend 
such a joyful occasion. 

Upon the request of the graduates 
of 1938 Dr. R. L. Swain presented a 
pen and pencil set to the Honorary 
President of the class of 1938— Dr. M. 
R. Thompson, who is resigning to take 
up his new work in New York. Doctor 
Thompson acknowledged the gift in 
appropriate words, and promised to 
keep in correspondence with the class 
of 1938. 

The new officers, as mentioned 
above, were installed and President 
Getz expressed his appreciation of the 
honor and his willingness to serve. 



July, 1938 



Resolution Presented 
By Class Of 1908 

The class of 1908 of the University 
of Maryland continues its wholeheart- 
ed interest in its Alma Mater and has 
pledged its support for a greater Uni- 
versity through the following reso- 
lutions which were unanimously ap- 
proved by the class and also by the 
Alumni Association at their annual 
meeting on May 21, 1938: 

Whereas, the class of 1908 of the 
University of Maryland, assembled 
this 21st day of May, 1938, in its 30th 
annual reunion, wishing to indicate 
its loyalty to its Alma Mater and to 
express its devotion to the principles 
imbued in its membership through its 
association with the former President 
R. W. Silvester: and further wishing 
to lay the foundation for a future 
memorial library building of monu- 
mental proportions, and to be in keep- 
ing with the dignity and standards of 
the University and of the State of 
Maryland, herewith, 

Resolves that the approximately 
$1,200 now held in escrow by the Uni- 
versity Treasurer, subject to use on 
behalf of the University for any proj- 
ect presented by the class of 1908, be 
immediately expended for a suitable 
permanent memorial. 

And, be it further Resolved, that 
the class of 1908 herewith subscribes 
the sum of $2,500 to be used as an ini- 
tial fund for the eventual construc- 
tion of the Memorial Library in the 
location on the campus and of the 
design as indicated on the reorganized 
plan for the campus as recently ap- 
proved by the Board of Regents. 

And, be it further Resolved, that 
the class of 1908 suggests to the other 
classes and former students of the 
University and other friends who may 
so wish to make gifts to augment this 
endowment fund until such time as 
sufficient funds may be in hand to 
construct the building. 

And, be it further Resolved, that 
when sufficient funds are in hand from 
any sources whatsoever to construct 
the proposed Memorial Library Build- 
ing, that the Board of Regents be re- 
quested to place in a prominent place 
in the building a plaque indicating 
that this building has been erected as 
a gift of the alumni to the University. 

And, be it further Resolved, that 
the University officials be requested to 
continue the 1908 class, "Silvester 
Award," in the form of a certificate 
in lieu of the type of award which has 
been given for the past 30 years. 



President's Message 




C. Walter Cole, '21, 
President, Alumni Association 

I welcome this opportunity to again 
express to you my grateful apprecia- 
tion for your generosity in electing 
me your president to serve during the 
year 1938-1939. I trust your expres- 
sion of confidence will be justified. 

As a graduate of the University of 
Maryland you are automatically eli- 
gible to membership in the Alumni 
Association of your Alma Mater. The 
only prerequisites are that you signify 
a willingness to join, and pay the 
nominal annual sum as dues of $2.00. 

Are these prerequisites burdensome 
or unreasonable? With one accord, all 
of us will readily answer, "No!" Why, 
then, have those of the alumni who 
have not joined the association failed 
to do so ? In some instances, lack of 
interest — yes. But, I dare say, in the 
great majority of cases the answer is, 
neglect. 

Think what it would mean to our 
association and to our Alma Mater 
should 80 per cent or more of the 
alumni of the university respond to 
this brief but earnest appeal to be- 
come active members! It would at 
once offer a stimulus that would carry 
the association forward to such an 
extent that our various functions held 
at the university during the year 
would be a genuine pleasure to look 
forward to and to attend. We have 
many constructive ideas whereby the 
association might definitely prosper, 
provided the support we ask from the 
alumni will only be forthcoming. 

Will you help us start off the new 
year with prompt enlistment on your 



Dr. Hitchcock, '24, 
Wins Science Award 

Dr. Albert Edwin Hitchcock, '24, 
now of Boyce Thompson Institute, 
Yorkers, N. Y., in plant physiology, 
received the 1935 award of the Ameri- 
can Association for the Advancement 
of Science judged on his publication 
on this subject. The auxins, or growth 
promoters for plants, are marketed 
in commercial quantities for amateur 
gardeners. Doctor Hitchcock will pre- 
sent the latest advances in this field. 

Doctor Hitchcock was born in Man- 
hattan, Kansas, January 10, 1898. He 
received his A. B. degree from Mary- 
land in '24; Fellow, '25; B. S., 25, and 
his Ph. D. from Columbia in '28. He 
worked as Field Ass't for the U. S. 
Department of Agriculture from '22 
to '25, also serving as collaborator of 
Botany collections with the same de- 
partment in the West Indies, Western 
States, and in Hawaii. His work has 
led him to study vegetative propaga- 
tion, chemical treatment of cut flowers, 
effect of gases on plants and many 
other interesting projects in connec- 
tion with the Botany Society and Tor- 
ry Botanical Club. 
• 

Diversified — This seems to be the de- 
sire of Rosalie Carr Grant, '34, who 
has attended Temple Business College, 
American Institute of Banking, and the 
University of Pennsylvania, School of 
Law. While taking these courses, Rosa- 
lie continued to work, first with the 
Washington Loan and Trust Company, 
and then in the office of the dean of 
the Law School of the University of 
Pennsylvania. Now she is doing secre- 
tarial work for the Association of 
American Railroads in Washington. 
Rosalie is a member of Kappa Kappa 
Gamma and former Women's Editor of 
the "Diamondback." 
• 

Copper — The assistant sales man- 
ager of the Seaboard Brass & Copper 
Company, of Baltimore, is Hollis F. 
Bennett, '11. 

part in the active ranks of the asso- 
ciation ? If you will, we will under- 
take to furnish enthusiastic, inspira- 
tional, effectual leadership. We desire 
and will strive for an active, up-and- 
doing organization. An organization 
that otherwise is neither interesting 
nor attractive. 

Cordially and sincerely yours, 
C. Walter Cole, 

President. 



Maryland Alumni News 



« OLD LINE ATHLETICS 

By W. H. ("Bill") HOTTEL 



» 



»> 



Hot Weather Line on Football Prospects for Next Fall 
ndicates Team Would Be About On Par With 1937 Eleven 



WITH the sports for the 1937-38 
term in retrospect, about the only 
thing- to think about now in the Terp 
ranks is football, always a timely topic 
even in hot weather. 

In fact, about all of the old grads 
that I run across at any old time al- 
ways ask about the grid prospects. 
Although Maryland never did and 
never will match in material the major 
teams it meets on the gridiron, Curley 
Byrd in his day and now Frank Dobson 
in his gives the assurance that the 
Terps always will be tough pickings. 

Last fall, Maryland won 8 of 10 
games and was nosed out only by Penn 
and Penn State, and the Terps promise 
to be just about as tough when the 
next season rolls around. 

Mainly Juniors and Sophs 

This, of course, is taking it for 
granted that all the material that was 
left over from the 1937 team and the 
freshman talent of note will return to 
classes in September. 

Maryland's 1938 edition will be 
mainly a junior-soph combination, as 
only five of the left over will be seniors 
in the fall. The starting team hardly 
will be quite as strong as the 1937 
eleven, but will possess greater re- 
serve strength. 

Eleven out of 19 letter men are left, 
giving such a grider for every posi- 
tion, except the guards and one end, 
and there are more than the usual 
number of promising recruits coming 
up from the 1937 freshman squad. 

Two Great Guards Lost 
T^EPLACING Bill Wolfe and Mike 
* Surgent, the greatest pair of 
guards Maryland has ever had at one 
time, will be a big problem, one that 
doubtless will not be fully solved. End 
reserves also may bother Coach Frank 
Dobson considerably, as three fine 
letter winning wingmen — Blair Smith, 
Bill Bryant, and John McCarthy — were 
lost. 

Leftover letter men include Nick 
Budkoff, end; Bob Brown and Ralph 
Albarano, tackles; Jim Forrester, cen- 
ter; Charlie Weidinger, the field gen- 
eral and ace passer; Jim Meade, great 
kicker and runner and all-Southern; 
John Boyda, Frank Skotnicki, Fred 



Hewitt, Pershing Mondorff and Bob 
Brand, backs. 

His Toe is Big Help 

[ONDORFF, in addition to other 
qualifications, is an ace place kick- 
er. He booted one 44 yards to beat 
Virginia last fall and is handy to get 
the point after touchdown. 

Francis Beamer, end, and John De- 
Armey, guard, doubtless would have 
been 1937 letter men had they not been 
injured. DeArmey was hurt in practice 
and did not play at all while Beamer 
was shelved for the rest of the cam- 
paign after being hurt early in the 
Penn tilt on October 2. 

All of the six linemen mentioned are 
husky and sturdy and there is plenty 
of all-round scoring punch packed in 



the seven letter men backs. Added to 
those are eight non-letter leftovers 
from 1937 and about 35 recruits from 
the freshman squad, at least a dozen 
of whom should see some service with 
the varsity. 

Add Speed to Backfield 

OE MURPHY, a fast little fellow 
coming up from the 1937 frosh; Joe 
Delvin, ineligible last fall, and Dick 
Shaffer, another yearling product, will 
add speed to the backfield. 

Bob Smith, a center, and George 
Gier.ger, a 205 - pounder who never 
played football until joining the Terp 
frosh, appear as the leading line 
rookies, but there are a number of 
others who should help plug the holes 
left at guard and end. 



PROSPECTIVE 1938 MARYLAND FOOTBALL ROSTER 



Name 



Pos. 



*Nick Budkoff End 

Francis Beamer End 

* Robert Brown Tackle 

*Ralph Albarano Tackle 

Bruce Davis Tackle 

Vernon Dowling Tackle 

John DeArmey Guard 

George Lawrence Guard 

Edward Lloyd Guard 

John Jones Guard 

Kenneth Hess Guard 

*Jim Forrester Center 

♦Charlie Weidinger Back 

4 Jim Meade Back 

*Fred Hewitt Back 

*Pershing Mondorff Back 

*John Bovda Back 

*Frank Skotnicki Back 

* Robert Brand Back 



Ht. 

6 

<;-2>.. 

6-1 

6 

6-2 

6-2 

5-8 

6-1 V 2 

5-11 

5-7 

5-11 

5-11 

5-10 

6-1 

5-11 

5-11 

6 

5-10 

6-1 



Wt. 
187 
183 
216 
198 
179 
178 
187 
184 
179 
160 
184 
170 
177 
190 
161 
190 
188 
163 
168 



Yrs. on 
Age Squad 
21 3 



21 
20 
23 
19 
22 
23 
22 
22 
20 
22 
20 
21 
24 
22 
20 
22 
20 
20 



High School Home 

Classical Lynn, Mass. 

Roosevelt Washington, D. C. 

W. Hazelton W. Hazelton, Pa. 

Lilly Lilly, Pa. 

Montgomery-Blair Silver Spring, Md. 

Annapolis Annapolis, Md. 

Windber Windber, Pa. 

Franklin-Marshall Academy Hanover, Pa. 

Western Washington, D. C. 

Central Washington, D. C. 

Tech Washington, D. C. 

Warrenton Berwyn, Md. 

McDonogh Baltimore, Md. 

Tome Port Deposit, Md. 

Baltimore City College Baltimore, Md. 

Emmitsburg Emmitsburg, Md. 

Vocational Edga, Pa. 

W. Hazelton W. Hazelton. Pa. 

Eastern Washington, D. C. 



Leading Talent from 

Frank Dwyer End 6-2 165 

Frank Blazek End 6-1 190 

Leo Mueller End 5-11 175 

George Gienger End-Tackle-Guard 6 201 

William Krouse Tackle 6-2 258 

Robert Cochrane.. Tackle 6 202 

Abe Cohen Guard 5-liy 2 190 

Paul McNeil Guard 6 180 

E'mer Fright Guard-Tackle 5-11 200 

Robert Smith Center 5-11 180 

Joe Murphy Rack 5-10 145 

tJo' Devlin Back 5-11 165 

"■child Shaffer... Back 6-3 175 

Fred Widener "ack 5-10 165 

John Morton Back 5-10 178 



1937 Freshman Squad 

21 Forest Park Baltimore, Md. 

19 Poly Baltimore, Md. 

20 Baltimore City College Baltimore, Md. 

24 Scottsville Brentwood. Md. 

21 Western Washington, D. C. 

20 Forest Park Baltimore, Md. 

19 Eastern Washington, D. C. 

18 Kingston Baltimore, Md. 

20 Poly Baltimore. Md. 

21 Tome Woodbyne, N. J. 

21 Tome Carney's Point, N. J. 

21 Mount Saint Joseph Baltimore, Md. 

19 Ferndale Denton, Md. 

19 Baltimore City College Baltimore. Md. 

18 Roxborough Mount Airy, Md. 



About 20 others, from whom some good talent should develop, will come up from the 1937 frosh 
squad, but those listed are likely to provide all of the leading performers for 1938. 

Head Coach: Frank M. Dobson. Assistants: John E. (Jack) Faber and Albert Heagy. Fresh- 
man Coach : Albert Woods. 

1938 Schedule with 1937 Scores, Maryland's Being Given First 

September 24 University of Richmond, College Park I Did not meet) 

October 1 Penn State. State College (14-211 

October 8 Syracuse University. Syracuse (13- 01 

October 15 Western Maryland. Baltimore ( 6- 0) 

October 22 University of Virginia. College Park ( 3- 0) 

October 29 V. M. I., College Park (9-71 

November 5 Open 

November 12 University of Florida. Gainsville (13- 7) 

November 19 Georgetown University, College Park (12- 2) 

November 24 Washington and Lee. Baltimore ( 8-0) 



* 1937 letter men. f Ineligible last season. 



July, 1938 



ABOUT PEOPLE WHOM WE KNOW 



Prison Study — Jerome Sacsts, '36, of 
Tau Epsilon Phi, received his Masters 
degree from Catholic University this 
year in Social Science. His specialty is 
the study of adjustments of the fami- 
lies of a selected group of imprisoned 
felons. He will continue his studies to- 
ward a Ph. D. degree this fall. 

O 
Abroad — David Sidell spent the sum- 
mer abroad and toured several Euro- 
pean countries. He visited his brother 
who is on the staff of the American 
Embassy in Riga, Latvia, and also on 
the American Embassy staff of Ger- 
many. 

O 

Teaching — A 1938 graduate, Abram 
Gottwals, has been appointed teacher 
of Vocational Agriculture at Glen Bur- 
nie High School and Arundle High 
School at Millersville. "Abe" is a mem- 
ber of Alpha Gamma Rho. 
O 

Engineering — John W. ("Bus") Pit- 
zer, '31, now is with the Langfelder 
Contractor Co., building bridges at Sin- 
gerly, Md. 

O 

Travel News — Dear old "Sammy" 
Leishear, '36, is way over there in 
Europe some place having the time of 
his life and playing with his orchestra 
in between times. One wonders how he 
stood the boat trip "this time." Vir- 
ginia Leish — or rather Donaldson, '37, 
— has just recently celebrated her very 
first wedding anniversary at the Leish- 
ear cottage at Edgewater Beach. She 
received most remarkable telegrams 
from brother "Sam" and friend Jerry 
Sacks. 

O 

Government — Madeline Bernard, '31, 
is with the Department of Labor in the 
Conciliation Division. She is a mem- 
ber of A. O. Pi and active in alumni 
affairs. 

O 

Teacher — Out at Maryland Park 
Hig-h School we find Margaret Cook, 
'31, teaching Home Economics, another 
A. 0. Pi, who lives in Washington. 
O 

Short Course — Among the graduates 
in the 1938 Rural Women's Short 
Course was Miss Frances I. Gruver, 
'28, now a teacher of French, English 
and Music in the Calvert County High 
School at Prince Frederick, Md. For- 
merly of Hyattsville, Miss Gruver is 



a member of the Tri Delt Sorority, the 
Women's Senior Honor Society, Phi 
Kappa Phi, and took a very active in- 
terest in co-ed extra-curricular activi- 
ties. She received her A.B. degree in 
the College of Education. 

O 
Athletics — James F.Zimmerman, '37, 
is a teacher of mathematics and coach 
of athletics at the Thurmont High 
School at Thurmont, Md. 

O 
Teacher — At the new Greenbelt High 
School we have Mary Frances Macub- 
bin, '37, as a teacher in English and 
history. 

O 
Welfare — Social work is the chosen 
career of Lula V. Davis, '37, a member 
of Mortar Board. She has taken social 
work at the University of Chicago, and 
at present is statistical clerk in the 
State Department of Public Welfare in 
Montgomery, Ala. 

O 
Kodak— John G. Hart, '37, of Ha- 
gerstown, Md., and a member of Phi 
Sigma Kappa, is with the Eastman 
Kodak Company in Rochester, N. Y. 
He was active in a number of student 
groups. 

O 
Secretarial — In the Folger Shakes- 
perian Library in Washington, Roberta 
Harrison, '31, is doing secretarial work. 

O 
Touring — Sam Fishkin, '30, and his 
orchestra made another sea-going trip 
to Europe this summer. Sam and his 
boys have been across the water sev- 
eral times. 

O 
Chicago — Rumors have it that Mr. 
and Mrs. Frank Blood, '35, and '36, are 
now in Chicago. Mrs. Blood was for- 
merly Dorothy Miles, '36, A. 0. Pi. 

O 
Insurance — In Montgomery County, 
a representative of the Massachusetts 
Mutual Life Insurance Company, is 
Mrs. Ethel M. Troy, a graduate of the 
University School of Nursing in '17. 
She is a former president of the Nurs- 
ing Alumnae Association and is located 
at Sandy Springs, Md. 

O 
Army — Thadd R. Dulin, '35, is now 
Second Lieutenant, U. S. A., and sta- 
tioned at Fort Washington, Md. He 
took the year's training under the 
Thomason Act and won a regular com- 



mission by his meritorious work in the 
course. Thadd, a member of Sigma Nu, 
was an outstanding member of the 
tennis team and captain in the R. O. 
T. C. 

O 

Advertising — Paul E. Welsh, '36, is 
representing the Hoffman Brothers 
Company, of Baltimore, in the adver- 
tising and printing business. Paul is a 
former president of the Young Men's 
Democratic Club on the University 
campus. 

O 

Finance — This has held the attention 
of Robert Graves, '35, who has been 
connected with finance in the U. S. 
Treasurer's Office of the Resettlement 
Administration, and now is the Re- 
gional Finance manager for the Farm 
Security Administration, U. S. D. A. 
Bob is located in San Francisco, Cal. 
O 

Hosteller — A hotel manager he will 
be, says John J. Bourke, '35, now assis- 
tant manager of Hotel Collingwood, 
New York City. John attended the 
Lewis Hotel Training School following 
graduation and then went to New York. 
John, a member of Sigma Nu, is very 
active in the New York Alumni group. 
O 

Chemist — Graduating with an M. S. 
in chemistry in 1935, Donald W. Chap- 
pell, '34, accepted a position as chemist 
with the Celanese Corporation of 
America in Cumberland, Md. Don is a 
member of Alpha Chi Sigma, honorary 
chemical fraternity. 
O 

Government — Following his gradua- 
tion in Arts and Science, Ralph I. 
Evans, '36, took a secretarial and ac- 
countancy course. He then entered the 
Bureau of Internal Revnue of the U. S. 
Government as a claims and correspon- 
dence secretary in the Miscellaneous 
Tax Unit of coal and silver. 
O 

Secretarial — Catherine Bixler, '33, 
probably knows a lot about the in's and 
out's of the office of a member of Con- 
gress. Since 1934, Catherine has been 
employed in a secretarial capacity for 
U. S. Senators. At present she is in 
the office of Hon. Harry Struman, U. S. 
Senator from Missouri. 

Catherine is a member of Tri Delt, 
was secretary of the Women's Senior 
Honor Society and has a long list of 
student activities. 

O 

Steel — Jesse Dale Patterson, '37, 
former business manager of the 
"Diamondback" and a star performer 
on the baseball team, is in the sales de- 



10 



Maryland Alumni News 



partment of the Bethlehem Steel Com- 
pany. Dale hails from Indian Head, 
Md., is a member of Phi Sigma Kappa 
and was quite active in student affairs. 
He is also a member of Omicron Delta 
Kappa, and several other fraternities. 

O 
Advertising — In the advertising de- 
partment of the Evening Star, we find 
Charles L. Cogswell, '36, a member of 
Delta Sigma Phi. 

O 
Married — During June, Ralph C. Wil- 
liams, '35, of Woodside, Md., married 
Miss Treva Cameron of Oklahoma. The 
honeymoon was spent touring through 
the south. 

Ralph is a grad in law from South- 
eastern University and a member of 
Sigma Phi Sigma. The newlyweds will 
make their home in Washington. 

O 
To Teach — When school opens at 
Damascus, Md., this fall, Mary Maxine 
White, '38, will be there as a teacher 
of French and English. Maxine is the 
daughter of F. M. White, '12, and re- 
sides at Dickerson, Md. Her sister 
Charlotte will enter Maryland this fall. 

O 
Sales Representative — Denzel Davis, 
'35, now is employed by the Ohio In- 
jector Company, manufacturers of 
steam valves. He is located in East 
Orange, N. J., and will represent the 
company in the New York metropoli- 
tan area, New Jersey, and Connecticut. 
Denzel is a member of Phi Delta Theta 
and married Nancy Brice of the K. D's. 

O 

Married — Richard 0. White, '34, and 
Miss Bertha Bounds of Laurel, Md., 
were married on June 8, 1938, at Falls 
Church, Va. Richard is Junior Ento- 
mologist for the Food Administration 
Division at Beltsville, Md. Mrs. White 
is secretary for the military office. 
They are living in Laurel, Md. 
O 

Fellowships — Four University stu- 
dents won fellowships for two weeks 
of training at the American Youth 
Foundation Camp on Lake Michigan. 
The awards are made by the Danforth 
Foundation of St. Louis. The winners 
were Helen Balderston of Cecil County, 
Junior in Home Economics, Frank Mc- 
Farland of Allegany County, a junior 
in Agriculture, Mary Johns of Prince 
George's County and Clay Shaw of 
Harford County, a senior in Agricul- 
ture. 

Miss Balderston and Mr. McFarland 
also won fellowships for two weeks 



study in St. Louis at headquarters of 
the Foundation. 

O 
Married — Harry Getz, '37, and Miss 
Dorothy Lee Prichard of Takoma Park 
were married in June at the Takoma 
Park Presbyterian Church. The honey- 
moon was spent motoring through the 
northern states. Harry, a member of 
Sigma Phi Sigma, is remembered for 
his contribution in athletics as a mem- 
ber of the football squad, where he won 
the varsity "M" and membership in 
the "M" Club. The newlyweds will live 
at 225 Gallatin Street, N. W., Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

O 

Married — On July 2, Margaret Noi 1 - 
ris, '37, married Mr. John F. Harvey 
of Barberton, Ohio. Mrs. Harvey is a 
member of Kappa Kappa Gamma and 
a grad in Home Economics. She was 
formerly employed at the Washington 
Gas and Light Company. The newly- 
weds are to make their home in Bar- 
berton, where Mr. Harvey is employed 
by the Babcox-Wilcox Company. 
O 

Loan Service — 
Manager for the 
Lincoln Loan Serv- 
ice of Baltimore is 
Chester W. Taw- 
ney, '31, president 
of the Baltimore 
Alumni Group. His 
offices are located 
at 2 East Lexing- 
ton Street. 
O 
Married — Remington, Va., was the 
scene of the wedding of Miss Lucille 
LaToure Stinnett and Dr. Arthur Bu- 
cher Hersberger, '32, member of Theta 
Chi. Mrs. Hersberger, a graduate of 
William and Mary, received her M. A. 
degree from Maryland. Arthur received 
his M. S. in '33, and his Ph.D. in '36, 
in the Department of Chemistry. At 
present he is research chemist at the 
Atlantic Refinery Company of Phila- 
delphia. 

James Rintoul, '36, was best man at 
the wedding, Carl Pergler, '33, and 
William Home, '34, all of Theta Chi, 
were in the wedding party. 
O 

Married — On July 2, at Catonsville, 
Md., Miss Vivian McGinn, and Bernard 
Graeves, Jr., '37, were married. Mrs. 
Graeves attended Maryland during 
1936-37, but because of illness did not 
continue. Bernard is a member of 
Lamda Chi Alpha and now is employed 
in New York. 




Kappa's — Maryland's 1938 beauty 
queen, Miss Tempe Curry, was the 
Kappa Kappa Gamma representative 
at the sorority's National Convention 
held at Hot Springs this summer. Tem- 
pe first spent a week visiting friends 
in Stanton, Va. 

O 
Married — Saturday, June 25, another 
campus romance culminated with a 
wedding. Miss Catherine Elizabeth 
Dennis, '34, and Mr. C. Temple Thom- 
ason, '37, took the step. Gertrude Nich- 
olls, '34, a sorority sister in Kappa 
Kappa Gamma, was the maid of honor. 
Mr. Edward Quinn, '38, was the best 
man. Temple is a member of Theta 
Chi and is now employed in the Gen- 
eral Accounting Office of the Govern- 
ment. 

O 
Engaged — At Plum Point a short 
time ago, the engagement of Miss 
Frances Alice Wheater and Mr. Adon 
W. Phillips, '38, was announced. Miss 
Wheater is a former student of the 
University and resides in Chevy Chase, 
Md. 

O 
Married — Graduates, then marries is 
what Miss Mary Virgniia Conway, '38, 
Home Economics, did. On June 25, she 
became the wife of Mr. Davidson Mil- 
ler of Washington. 

O 

Married — A June bride was Miss 
Rebecca Charlotte Miller, '36, a mem- 
ber of A. O. Pi. She is now Mrs. John 
Taylor Fisher. 

O 

Marine — Lt. Fairfax Walters, '35, 
former Lt. Colonel of the R. 0. T. C, 
has been transferred from the U. S. 
Marine base in Pensacola, Fla., to 
Quantico, Va. 

O 

Law — In 1936, Harold Edward 
Naughton, '34, received his LL. B. de- 
gree from the University's School of 
Law in Baltimore. A native of Alle- 
ghany County, Harold returned to his 
home community and began the prac- 
tice of law in Cumberland, Md. 
O 

Flying — Sam Silber, '34, former la- 
crosse star now flies for Uncle Sam's 
Navy. Sam flew to College Park for 
the Alumni Reunion and to see the 
Maryland-Hopkins lacrosse game. He 
is stationed at the Naval Air Station, 
Norfolk, Va. 

Sam is a member of Sigma Alpha 
Mu fraternity. 

O 

Salesman — Norwood Sothorn, '34, a 
halfback of fame, now is a sales rep- 



June, 1938 



11 



resentative for the Washburn Crosby 
Company of Washington. A member 

of the K. A. fraternity and one of 
Maryland's most outstanding students, 
Norwood won both the Citizenship and 
Athletic medals in his senior year and 
was president of his class. 

O 
Medical — The resident in obstetrics 
at the Union Memorial Hospital in Bal- 
timore is Dr. A. Franklin McCauley, 
'33. He has also served at the Mary- 
land General Hospital and at the Hos- 
pital for Women of Maryland. 

O 
Anesthesia — A fellowship in Anes- 
thesia at the Lahey Clinic in Boston is 
held by Dr. Morris John Nicholson, '33, 
M. D., '36. 

O 
Married — Frances Townsend, '38, of 
Riverdale, married Mr. William R. 
Trammell on Friday, May 6. The new- 
lyweds are making their home at 14 
Claggett Road, University Park, Md. 

O 
Insurance — Hammy Derr, '31, is the 
Frederick representative for the Penn- 
sylvania Mutual Life Insurance Com- 
pany. He is a former diamond star and 
a member of A. T. O. 

O 
Birth — Mr. and Mrs. Chester W. 
Venneman are the proud parents of a 
boy, Chester, Jr., born March 27. Mrs. 
Venneman was formerly Miss Ruth 
Leight. 

O 
Wedding — Richard Baldwin, '34, and 
Miss Elsie Stanforth, '32, were mar- 
ried June 30 in Mt. Rainier Christian 
Church. Miss Stanforth of Mt. Rainier 
was a Tri-Delt and Dick, as his buddies 
in Phi Delta Theta call him, is a for- 
mer member of the Diamondback. Dick 
now is a safety engineer in Maryland 
Casualty Company of Baltimore. 

O 
Accident — the result of an accident 
while riding horseback in Buffalo, 
N. Y., killed Mrs. Robert Allen, wife 
of Bob Allen, '32. The couple were 
married following Bob's graduation 
from the United States Flying School 
at Kelly Field, Texas, in 1934. Bob is 
connected with the Liberty Mutual In- 
surance Company as safety engineer, 
and located in Buffalo, N. Y. 

O 
Visitor — One of Maryland's out- 
standing and most prominent Alumni 
in the services of the U. S. Govern- 
ment, recently visited the campus. He 
was Lieutenant Colonel L. M. Silves- 
ter, '12, now stationed at Fort Benning, 
Ga. Colonel Silvester was for two 



years president of the "M" Club, while 
on duty in Washington City, a few 
years ago. He also served as chairman 
of the 130th anniversary banquet to 
commemorate the signing of the Uni- 
versity Charter. Colonel Silvester was 
in Washington on official business, but 
did not miss the opportunity to visit 
the "Campus On The Hill." 

O 
Rhode Island — Theresa Dunne, '32, 
has been transferred to Providence, 
R. I., by the United States Employ- 
ment Commission. Theresa has been 
connected with the Employment Serv- 
ice in Baltimore for some time and 
previously served as field director. 

O 
Secretarial — Majorie R. Grinstead, 
'36, is a secretary in the Safety Edu- 
cation Work Department of the Na- 
tional Education Association in Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

O 
Rubber — Field Engineer Watson I. 
Ford, '25, is with the United States 
Rubber Company located near Detroit, 
Mich. 

O 
Physiologist — The United States 
Department of Agriculture sent C. P. 
Harley, '23, to Wenatshee, Wash., 
where he is doing physiology work. 

O 
Can— Thomas D. Holder, '22, is an 
agriculturist with the American Can 
Company in Rochester, N. Y. 

O 
Personnel — In Washington, Harry E. 
Carter, '34, is the personnel office man- 
ager for the Hecht Company. He is in 
charge of employment and expense 



control. Harry, a member of Sigma 
Nu, was a captain in the R. O. T. C, 
a senior cheer leader, and member of 
0. D. K. 

O 
Dietician — At the Sibley Hospital in 
Washington, D. C, Mary Ruth Cross, 
'36, is assistant dietician. 
O 
Chemist — High in the ranks of 
chemists we find J. Frank Barton, '24, 
with the Atlas Cement Company in 
Hamberg, N. Y. 

O 
Physician — Now a practicing physi- 
cian is Otto George Matheke, '34, in 
Newark, N. J., his native country. 
O 
Engineer — Charles H. Tompkins 
Company has for a chief engineer J. 
Slater Davidson, Jr., '28. 
O 
Mortician — Walter Brooks Bradley, 
'37, is the president and owner of a 
funeral home in Baltimore, Md. 
O 
Poultry — At Stemmers Run, Md., 
we find George H. Vandermast, '19, 
running a progressive poultry farm. 
O 
Lawyer — In Salisbury, Md., Charles 
E. Hearnem, Jr., '30, is a practicing 
attorney. 

O 
Michigan — We recently heard from 
Richard C. Williams, '14, now in De- 
troit, Mich., with the Du Pont Com- 
pany. 

O 
Lumber — Over in Arlington, Va., 
Henry P. Ames runs a lumber busi- 
ness. 



Have You Joined Your Fellow Alumni? 

If Not, Fill Out and Return the Following Blank Now 



Fellow Alumni: I wish to be a contributing member of the University 
of Maryland Alumni Association, and am enclosing the usual amount 
of $2.00 for the year 1938-39, of this fifty cents is for one year's 
subscription to the Alumni News. 

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Business address Title 



O- 



^ flft ^ G 




Vjrrace Moore 
in Magnolia Gardens 

Chesterfield time is 

pleasure time everywhere 




Copyright 1938, Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. 





*■ 




n 







Maryland 

Alumni News 




■■HmBmBH 



Florida Game 



Follow The Maryland Terrapins » » » 

• • • 

FOOTBALL SCHEDULE, 1938 

September 24 — Richmond College Park 

Reserved Seats, $1.10; General Admission, 55 Cents 

October 1— Penn State State College 

October 8 — Syracuse Syracuse 

October 15 — Western Maryland Baltimore 

Reserved Seats, $1.65 and $1.10 

October 22 — Virginia College Park 

Reserved Seats, $1.50; General Admission, 75 Cents 

October 29— Virginia Military Institute HOMECOMING College Park 

Reserved Seats, $1.50; General Admission, 75 Cents 

November 1 2 — Florida Gainesville 

November 1 9 — Georgetown College Park 

Reserved Seats, $1.65; General Admission, $1.10 

November 24 — Washington and Lee Paltimore 

Reserved Seats, $1.65 and $1.10 

Prices include any taxes in all instances. All games start at 2:30 P.M., except Georgetown at 2 o'clock. 

Applications for advanced reservations should be made to the Athletic Office, University of Maryland, College 
Park. Add fifteen (15c) cents to any order if yon desire yoar tickets sent by registered mail. 



Fellow Alumni: The Athletic Board has made available for those Alumni who attend every home game a special 
season book which will save the price of one game. The season book will cost an Alumnus six ($6.00) dollars (tax in- 
cluded) and will be good for the following games: Richmond, Virginia, V. M. I., Georgetown, and Washington 
and LEE. There will be a coupon in the book for each game which will be exchangeable for a top-priced reserved seat 
ticket. Other tickets may be purchased at the established game price to accompany the holder of a season book. All 
ai>/)lications for season books must be made wHth the Athletic Office at College Park, on or before September 24. No 
refunds will be made on any season book and unused coupons will not be exchanged for subsequent games. 



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Volume X 



MARYLAND ALUMNI NEWS, AUGUST, 1938 



Number 3 



Alumni Association-University of Maryland 



Founded in 1892 

♦ 

Officers for 1938-39 

C. WALTER COLE, '21, President 



Towson, Md. 



Charles W. Sylvester, '08, Vice-President 
Baltimore, Md. 



G. F. Pollock, '23, Sec-Treasurer 
College Park, Md. 



Alumni Board 

(Note — The officers named above are also members of the Alumni Board) 
Reuben Brigham, '08, P. W. Chichester, '20, Education 

Arts and Sciences John A. Silkman, '35, Agriculture 

Charles V. Koons, '29, Engineering Ruth Miles, '31, Home Economics 

Members at Large 

Esther Hughes Lee, '33, Women's Rep. J. Donald Kieffer, '30, Men's Rep. 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Editor 

Maryland Alumni News, issued monthly by the University of Maryland 
Alumni Association at College Park, Md., as second-class matter under the Act 
of Congress of March 3, 1879. 

Annual Alumni Association dues are $2.00. One year's subscription to 
Alumni News, 50 cents. 

Group Leaders 

Allegany County: E. Brooke Whiting, '98, President; Dr. Joseph Franklin, '21, Secretary, Cum- 
berland, Md. 

Baltimore County: C. Walter Cole, '21, President; H. B. Derrick, '17, Secretary, Towson, Md. 

Baltimore City: Chester Tawney, '31, President, 4022 Roland Avenue; E. Gordon Hammond. '34. 
Secretary, 1023 W. Barre Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Caroline County: George W. Clendaniel, '20, President, Denton; Dr. Maurice A. Brackett, '21, 
Treasurer, Denton ; Mrs. George W. Clendaniel, '21, Secretary, Denton. 

Harford County: W. B. Munnikhuysen, '14, President; H. M. Carroll, '20, Secretary, Bel Air, Md. 

Frederick County: J. Homer Remsberg, '18, President; Henry R. Shoemaker, '17, Secretary, 
Frederick, Md. 

Montgomery County: Lawrence G. Smoot, '18. President, Kensington, Md. ; Mary Fisher, '36, 
Secretary, Rockville, Md. 

New York City: Donald Kieffer, '30, President, 195 Broadway; Sarah Morris, '25, Secretary, 
140 E. 63rd Street, New York City. 

Philadelphia: A. Moulton McNutt, '06, President, 413 Cooper Street, Camden, N. J.; J. P. Mudd, 
'07, 'Secretary, 173 Manheim Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pittsburg: E. Minor Wenner, '27, President, 1111 Gladys Avenue; Dr. A. A. Krieger, '32, Sec- 
retary, Highland Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Washington. D. C: J. Douglas Wallop. '19, President. 6139 N. Dakota Avenue, N. W. ; Charles V. 
Koons, '29, Secretary, 419 Fourth Street, N. E., Washington. 

Washington County: Hon. Henry Holzapfel, Jr., '93, President, Hagerstown, Md. ; L. G. Mathias, 
'23, Secretary, Hagerstown, Md. 

"M" Club Officers and Board Members 



President — Dr. A. A. Parker, '04. 
Vice-President — Donald H. Adams, '28. 



Secretary-Treas. — Dr. E. N. Cory, '09. 
Historian— Bob Hill. '26. 



Representatives 



Baseball- G. F. Pollock, '23. 
Basket-ball— H. B. Shipley, '14. 
Boxing — Victor Wingate, '35. 
Lacrosse — James Stevens, '19. 
Track — Lewis W. Thomas, '28. 



Tennis — James Shumate, '17. 
Cross Co. — Charles Remsberg, '26. 
Football— Kirk Besley, '23. 
At Large — Dr. E. B. Friedenwald, '03. 
Dr. A. W. Valentine, '04. 



Cover Picture 

This is a familiar building to many, 
the Infirmary, located between the 
Dining Hall and Morrill Hall. Soon 
this building will be revamped and 
made larger to accomodate the de- 
mand by increased enrollment. The 
front will be changed and this picture 
will be the only remembrance of how 
the Infirmary used to look. Oh, yes, 
the lady on the porch. Why, she is the 
well known Dorothy Bolton, '30, head 
nurse for several years. She now is 
Mrs. Warren Rabitt. 
• 

Rossburg Building 

The old Rossburg Building, as all 
students remember it, is rapidly chang- 
ing form and is being restored to its 
original architecture when first con- 
structed 140 years ago. A picture of 
the Rossburg as it looked in those 
colonial days appeared in the May is- 
sue of the "News." Its future use will 
be as a club for faculty and alumni. 
• 

Montgomery 
County Group 

During the month of May, Lawrence 
R. Smoot, '18, of Kensington, Mary- 
land, got together a group of Old Line 
Alumni and brought about the organi- 
zation of an alumni club in Montgom- 
ery County. Dr. W. W. Skinner, '95, 
chairman of the Board of Regents and 
director for the research bureau of the 
Department of Chemistry of the U. S. 
D. A., was unanimously elected honor- 
ary president of the club. 

Prior to the organization of the 
group the Hon. Melvin C. Hazen, '88, 
first president of the Alumni Associ- 
ation who this year is celebrating the 
50th anniversary of his class, gave a 
very inspiring talk before the group. 

The regular order of organization 
was then conducted and Lawrence R. 
Smoot, '18, was elected president. Miss 
Mary Fisher, '36, of Rockville, was 
elected secretary. 

Several committees were appointed, 
following which a resolution was pass- 
ed that an annual meeting be held in 
September for perfecting a more per- 
manent organization. The date will be 
announced later. 



Maryland Alumni News 



Burgee, '27, Heads 
Charlotte Hall School 

The "Fountain of Healing 
Waters" in St. Mary's County of 
the Old Line State is the location 
of one of the country's oldest acade- 
my's, Charlotte Hall School, found- 
ed in 1774. When this famous old 
colonial school begins its 1938-39 
term, Miels Burgee, '27, will be the 
head master to succeed the late Col. 
B. F. Crowson. 

"Miels" is a member of the "M" 
Club and a former participant in 
football, basket-ball, and baseball, 
performing with considerable prom- 
inence in the latter two. He is a 
member of the Alpha Tau Omega 
fraternity and a graduate of Edu- 
cation. He went to Charlotte Hall 
shortly after graduation and has 
been there ever since, his meritori- 
ous service gaining for him many 
promotions. 

Charlotte Hall was the result of 
a Free Public School act by the 
Maryland General Assembly in 
1723, "for the encouragement of 
learning, and erecting schools in 
several counties within the Province." 
St. Mary's, Charles and Prince George's 
Counties merged their funds and 
founded the school, naming it in honor 
of Queen Charlotte of England. 
• 

Personal Mention 

At Englewood, N. J., Ruth E. Som- 
erville, '37 is assistant executive sec- 
retary of the Northern Valley Chap- 
ter of the Amercan Red Cross. 
O 

Mr. and Mrs. John P. Huebsch have 

a baby girl. John, '33, is employed at 

the Potomac Electric Power Co. and 

they expect to move to Virginia soon. 

O 

Harry E. Carter, '34, of Washing- 
ton, is the personnel office manager for 
the Hecht Company of Washington, 
D. C. He is in charge of employment, 
expense control. 

O 

Arthur G. Turner, Jr., '32, 324 Gar- 
land Avenue, Takoma Park, D. C, is 
employed with the Turner Construc- 
tion Company. He is married and the 
father of a baby girl. 
O 

Harry E. Dyer, Jr., '34, a public 
school teacher, takes law at the Uni- 
versity in Baltimore. Harry, a Sigma 
Nu, hails from Havre de Grace, Md. 

Harry was active in many student 
affairs as well as attaining member- 
ship in Phi Kappa Phi. 



CANDIDATE 




William W. (Bill) Evans 

Evans, 31 , 

Enters Political Race 

Over in Montgomery County, where 
the topic of the day is politics from 
national to local offices, we find in the 
thick of a local race William Wilder 
(Bill) Evans, '31, a former athlete of 
considerable prominence in sport at 
the Old Line School. In football, 
"Moon," as his fellow team mates 
called him, was one of the greatest 
quarter backs Maryland ever had. He 
was Lawrence Perry's second Ail- 
American choice, other AU-American 
honors came to him in lacrosse. In 
the latter sport his national recogni- 
tion was for a superior attack in 
strategy, accuracy, and precision. He 
was also captain of the basket-ball 
team. 

Following graduation, "Bill" elected 
to study law in which he received his 
LL.B. degree from George Washington 
University. Shortly afterward he open- 
ed offices in Rockville, Md., where he 
has won considerable recognition as a 
prominent member of the Bar. He is 
a life-long resident of Montgomery 
County, born and raised in Chevy 
Chase, Md. He is the son of Dr. and 
Mrs. Wilbur E. Evans of Chevy Chase. 
"Bill" aspires to be States Attorney 
for Montgomery County. 



Fourteen-Thousand 
Mile Voyage Home 

By Preston L. Peach, '03 

Fourteen thousand miles in 45 
days, with two Summers, an Au- 
tumn and a Spring, was the com- 
position of our journey this time 
back to Maryland. We left Kuala 
j Lumpor, Federated Malaya States, 
Malaya, on February 12 and travel- 
ed 22 miles to the seaport Swetten- 
ham where we took the ship "Cin- 
galese Prince," and then without 
a change we sailed by way of 
Penang, Colombo, and then south- 
west into an Indian Ocean Summer 
by the island of Madagascar down 
to the Autumn of South Africa, 
around the Cape of Good Hope. We 
turned north and sailed into the 
South Atlantic Summer to West 
Africa to the port of Dakar, the 
extreme west point of Africa near 
Cape Verde. From there we turned 
straight to the northwest across 
the Atlantic to Halifax into the 
Springtime of the northern hemis- 
phere. Down to Boston and then by 
train to New York and Washington 
brought us into Maryland's lovely 
Spring, and soon we were into Summer 
again, having experienced this latter 
season three times in four months. It 
was a wonderful journey, calm sea and 
restful. We had one night in the 
North Atlantic when the trunks rolled 
across the cabin, but one such night 
in 45 is quite satisfactory. 

There were ten of us traveling, two 
Wall Street men, a tea expert and his 
wife from Ceylon, two school teach- 
ers and a couple from West Virginia. 
The main cargo on this ship was not 
people but rubber, hemp, tin, palm oil, 
sugar, coconut oil and liquid latex 
from the rubber tree of Malaya. This 
journey cost us $210 apiece. This 
shipping line — the Prince Line — will 
take you around the world on a three- 
month tour for $525. It is cheaper to 
travel than to stay at home, and what 
a great difference it makes to one's 
outlook on the world and all the things 
that are going on now. A trip like the 
one we have just finished is a wonder- 
ful way to get some hard thinking 
and writing and reading out of the 
way. Incidentially you can do a lot of 
sleeping too and if you like to eat you 
will certainly enjoy five meals a day. 

The most interesting experience we 
had I think was to sail for two hours 
close up to one of the remaining four 

(Continued on Page 6) 



August, 1938 



Landing Safely 

"Flying- around in the air with a 
busted landing gear was no thrill, but 
landing with minor damages to your 
plane was certainly a happy feeling," 
said Bob Slye, U. S. Naval cadet flyer. 
Bob, the former hurdle racer of the 
cinder tracks, entered the profession 
of jumping bigger hurdles. He entered 
the U. S. Naval training course and 
went to Pensacola, Florida. Since then 
he has practically covered the entire 
Eastern Seaboard in addition to mak- 
ing several trips across the continent. 
He now is stationed at Cape May, New 
Jersey, where he is taking tactical 
training for sea flying. Bob belongs 
to the Dive Bombing Squadron of the 
U. S. S. Enterprise Aeroplane Carrier. 

Cross Country 

It was on a recent trip across the 
continent to San Diego, California, 
that he had the hair-raising episode 
with the broken landing gear. Re- 
cently Bob visited the campus and it 
was the natural question for every 
one to ask about his experience. Here 
are a few of the things some were able 
to get out of him. He was on a cross 
country trip to California in a naval 
scout plane, and they were scheduled 
to stop at Kansas City. Upon nearing 
the landing field it is routine to let the 
landing gear down in place and by 
instruments check it for position. One 
of the indicators showed that one 
wheel was not in place. He went up 
again and tried to get the wheel in 
place, but all in vain. 

Passenger 

With him was a West Point cadet 
who was hitch-hiking a ride to the 
coast. Bob sent a note back to him 
telling him what to do when an at- 
tempted landing would be made. He 
then circled the field and dropped a 
note asking the ground crew to check 
the position of the landing and if any- 
thing was wrong to wave a red flag, 
and they did. 

In the event of a crackup in landing- 
Bob took the precaution to remain in 
the air long enough to practically ex- 
haust all of the gas on board in order 
to prevent a fire. While you may cut 
the gas off from the motor there is 
plenty of friction to set it off when 
landing. While he was circling the 
field the airport summoned doctors, 
nurses, fire engines, ambulances, etc. 
How the crowd did gather to see a 

(See Landing Safely — Page 10) 



Your Cooperation 
Solicited 




C. Walter Cole 

Fellow Alumni: 

Upon checking the alumni files I 
was not discouraged but amazed to 
find some alumni whom I personally 
know among the inactive members of 
our association. Does it not seem that 
those of us who spent some of our 
best years on the campus, "On the 
Hill", would evidence at least sufficient 
interest to annually contribute the 
nominal sum of two dollars for active 
membership in the Alumni Association? 
There are others whom I do not know 
personally, but believe that they con- 
scientiously feel as I do toward the old 
school and their fellow alumni. 

It is my hope and ambition that our 
association will eventually, and at an 
early date, establish an adequately 
subsidized permanent headquarters at 
the university that will be of such an 
attraction that all alumni will want to 
frequently return to the campus. A 
one hundred percent active member- 
ship is the goal of our association for 
the ensuing year to accomplish our 
desires. This is not impossible and 
with your individual support it will be 
obtained. Again, as president, I am 
personally asking your cooperative 
help in furthering the progressive 
work of our association. 

Cordially yours, 
C. Walter Cole, '21, 

President. 



In Alaska On 
The Yukon 

On the banks of the Yukon in far 
off Alaska, a graduate of the Univer- 
sity School of Nursing is the Public 
Health Nurse for the U. S. Indian Res- 
ervation — Miss Bernice E. Brittian, 
'30, a native of Eastern Shore. 

Miss Brittian was formerly with the 
University Hospital from which she 
resigned and made the trip to Alaska 
early last spring. The trip she writes 
about was quite interesting, as part 
was by steamer, part by aeroplane and 
some by dog sled. 

The reservation hospital is located 
on the banks of the Yukon at a place 
called Tanana. A letter to a friend 
was written the latter part of May 
and it was necessary to get it off be- 
fore the break up of the ice, as no 
mail would be in or out while the ice 
was moving out. At that time they 
were planting flower seeds indoors to 
get them started for outdoor planting 
after the middle of June. 

Already several rather interesting 
incidents have occurred in the Hos- 
pital. She is delighted with the work 
and it has been her ambition. 



© 



Prominent 
Pathologist 



In Long Island City, N. Y., there is 
Dr. W. W. Hala, M.D., '05, a promi- 
nent pathologist and former athlete 
of the Baltimore Schools. He is an 
associate professor of Pathology at 
the Long Island College of Medicine 
and director of the Pathological De- 
partment of King's County Hospital of 
Brooklyn, New York. He also is at- 
tending pathologist to the Caledonian 
and the Carson County Pack Hospital 
in Brooklyn. Dr. Hala is co-author 
of "The Textbook of Pathology". He 
belongs to several fraternity and pro- 
fessional organizations, which include 
the New York Pathologists, a diplo- 
mate of the American Board of Pathol- 
ogy, and the American Medical Asso- 
ciation. 

• 

Married — Foi merly Miss Lois Stein- 
wedel, '34, a graduate of the Nursing 
School in 1934, now is Mrs. Edward L. 
Kaiserski, of Baltimore. Upon gradu- 
ation from the Nurses' School, Lois 
won a fellowship to Columbia Univer- 
sity in Nursing Education. This was 
an award in recognition of her out- 
standing work as a student nurse. 



SI 

aa 



as 
e 



Maryland Alumni News 



Public Funds For Education 



With a great pride the National Gov- 
ernment can point to the University 
where public funds have been used 
with lasting potential values. 

In the past few years the legislative 
appiopriations have been supplement- 
ed with PWA or WPA funds on a 
number of the physical improvements 
of the University. One of the leading 
and most modern hospitals in the coun- 
try is the University Hospital in Bal- 
timore which was constructed at a 
cost of $2,000,000. In addition many 
private citizens as well as organiza- 
tions made contributions toward the 
equipment in the hospital. 

At College Park a new up-to-date 
experiment station in the department 
of Animal Husbandry has been built, 
the College of Arts and Sciences build- 
ing, and the new girls' dorm. All of 
the forementioned buildings have been 
completed. 

The new program calls for the 
erection of several buildings both in 
Baltimore and at College Park. The 
nurses' home, a much-needed expan- 
sion, is in the program. Two more 



floors are to be added to the already 
over-taxed hospital. A new medical 
building where many new research 
problems will be carried on. The Den- 
tal School will be expanded. 

The increasing enrollment at Col- 
lege Park calls for more classroom 
and dormitory space. First probably 
on the program will be a new men's 
dormitory and an addition to the din- 
ing hall. The present infirmary will 
be renovated and enlarged. An addi- 
tion will be added to the Engineering 
building, as well as more space for 
Home Economics. With the rapidly 
increasing Library the administration 
office, now located on the first floor of 
the Library, will be moved to new quar- 
ters which will be in rear of the Agri- 
culture building facing the north, 
when completed. 

All of the improvements will give 
greater opportunities to the future gen- 
erations of the Old Line State for a 
higher education. It is something 
with which you endow yourself that 
no man can take from you. Mary- 
landers continue to lead Maryland on! 



College Of Commerce Established 



The young men and women of Mary- 
land who wish to take up commercial, 
industrial, and agricultural vocations 
will have additional means of prepa- 
ration with the establishment of a Col- 
lege of Commerce at the University. 
Professional training in economics and 
business administration will be pro- 
vided for those who plan to become 
executives, teachers, or investigators 
in commercial, industrial, agricultural, 
and governmental economic enterpris- 
es. Beginning with this fall, a wide 
selection of courses will be made avail- 
able in each of seven fields of general 
and applied economics, namely: mar- 
keting, finance, foreign trade and 
transportation, organization and man- 
agement, accountancy, agricultural 
economics, and general economics. 

The association of agricultural eco- 
nomics with business administration 
departments, like marketing, finance, 
accounting, and transportation gives 
the University an unusual opportunity 
to train men who will be useful in 
farmers' business and cooperative 
organizations, because effective mar- 
keting, financing, and transportation 
are exceedingly important to Mary- 
land farmers. Close association with 
technical departments of the College of 
Agriculture will be emphasized. 

A four-year curriculum in general 



business is offered for students who 
wish to prepare for a career in busi- 
ness administration. Additional cur- 
ricula are also available for those who 
wish to specialize in accounting, mar- 
keting and sales administration, agri- 
cultural economics, or finance. A com- 
bination curriculum with the School of 
Law at Baltimore will permit a stu- 
dent to graduate in both subjects in 
as short a time as six years. 

Maryland is the first university to 
offer a four-year training program in 
cooperative organization and admin- 
istration. Special provision is made 
for courses suitable to those who wish 
to prepare themselves to become lead- 
ers or executives of agricultural coop- 
eratives, consumer cooperatives, or in 
trade associations among business men. 
An important part of the training con- 
sists of practical work with these 
associations. 

A strong faculty has been brought 
to Maryland for the new college. The 
dean, Dr. W. Mackenzie Stevent, in 
addition to considerable experience as 
an executive in private business, has 
been an economist with the United 
State Department of Agriculture and 
principal organization expert with the 
former Federal Farm Board. For two 
years prior to present hostilities in the 
Far East, he was Technical Adviser 



to the Chinese National Government 
at Nanking on marketing, finance, and 
cooperative organization. Dr. Allan G. 
Gruchy, author of a well-known book 
on bank supervision, has been brought 
here as professor of finance. Dr. 
Alpheus R. Marshall, formerly of the 
University of Virginia, teaches eco- 
nomic theory, and John C. Mullin 
from the Harvard Graduate School of 
Business Administration, advertising. 
In addition to the new men, the entire 
staff of the departments of economics, 
business administration, and agricul- 
tural economics have been brought into 
the new college. S. M. Wedebei'g, cer- 
tified public accountant, heads ac- 
counting, and Dr. S. H. DeVault con- 
tinues under the new set-up as chair- 
man of the Department of Agricultural 
Economics. Other appointments are 
expected to be announced shortly. 
9 

Fourteen-Thousand 
Mile Voyage Home 

(Continued from Page 4) 

square-rigged sailing ships as we 
turned around Cape of Good Hope. It 
was a beautiful sight. The captain of 
our ship said that he had been sailing 
for 30 years and had never seen one 
under sail before. And to add to the 
interest of such a sight as we came 
near to it, there, out over the water, 
was the great albatross sailing around. 
This sea bird can only be seen in 
southern waters. It brought to all of 
us the great lines of the "Ancient 
Mariner." Another interesting thing 
of this journey was the fact that when 
we sailed up toward West Africa we 
came within 60 miles of that spot on 
the globe where the navigator records 
Zero Lat. and Zero Long. That point 
is not far from the mouth of the great 
Congo River. 

It was wonderful to get home again. 
Maryland and particularly the Univer- 
sity of Maryland makes my Maryland 
heart very glad. It does not seem like 
we have been away four and a half 
years. Time flies when one lives in the 
country where there is nothing but 
summer. 

[Note— Preston L. Peach, '03, has 
been on missionary duty in the Feder- 
ated Malaya States as principal of a 
high school at Kaula Lumpor. He was 
on a furlough this summer after four 
and a half years and will return to 
Malaya this winter. His talks about 
the Far Eastern conditions are very 
interesting and we will endeavor to 
have him send us more items about 
his travels.] 



August, 1938 



Men Who Will Again Handle Varsity Football Team » 




Jack Faber, Assistant 



Frank Dobson, Head Coach 



Richmond Is Tough Early Foe For Terp Gridders 

By W. H. (Bill) HOTTEL 



With the opening game with the 
University of Richmond, a formidable 
foe, listed on September 24, Maryland 
will have to step on the gas in the 
grid practice sessions that start on 
Thursday, September 1. 

Frank Dobson, who will again han- 
dle the reins, and Jack Faber and Al 
Heagy, his assistants, are not singing 
the blues, but they have some problems 
to overcome. As said before, find- 
ing a pair of guards to fill the shoes 
left vacant by Mike Surgent and Bill 
Wolfe is the big task. A duo like them 
is not found very often on any man's 
football team. 

However, the sophomore line talent 
appears to be better than usual and 
the men needed to complete a team ca- 
pable of battling a nine game schedule 
should be found among them. All of 



last year's leading backs are available 
again with some speedy ball carrying 
sophs to augment their efforts. If a 
f oi ward wall anywhere near equaling 
that of last season can be melded, the 
offense should be better than that of 
1937. 

Dobby Has New Stuff 

Dobson, who showed a varied attack 
and a tight defense to set such a fine 
record last year, has been mapping out 
some new stuff this summer and he 
will have his repertoire all ready for 
the Terps when they gather to begin 
the workouts. 

While the loss of the St. John's game 
and the shifting of the Western Mary- 
land tilt from November 5 to October 
15 left the former date open, the gap 
comes at an opportune time. The va- 
cancy follows the tough V. M. I. home- 
coming game at College Park on Octo- 



Al Heagy, Assistant 

bar 29 and precedes the long jaunt to 
play Florida at Gainesville on Novem- 
ber 12. As the team has to leave for 
Gainesville on a Thursday, it will have 
only a little over the average time to 
prepare for the game with the Gators. 
With the St. John's game off, the 
Maryland schedule contains nothing 
but major battles, with the tilts with 
Penn State, Syracuse, V. M. I. and 
Florida about the toughest. And the 
V. M. I. game easily may be the tough- 
est of them all. In fact, the Terps 
rated the 1937 V. M. I. team they beat, 
9 to 7, as superior to Penn and Penn 
State, to which they lost by slim 
margins. 

Mack Unable to Scout 

Heagy and Al Woods, the freshman 
coach, doubtless will have to do a lot 
of double duty this fall, with plenty of 
scouting added to their tutoring duties. 
Roy Mackert, the head of the Physical 
Education Department, and former 

(Continued on page 10) 






S3 



a: 

s 






is 



Maryland Alumni News 



Grapevine News About Whom We Know 



t> 



"9 



-o 



Law — Paul C. Wolman, '17, of Wood- 
bine, Md., has been named Assistant 
State's Attorney in the State's Attor- 
ney's Office of Baltimore. 

Wolman left in his senior year to 
enter the Army, participating in the 
World War. Following the signing of 
the Armistice he studied law in Lon- 
don. 

On his return to America he was 
admitted to the Bar in 1920. He has 
been active in many civic affairs, and 
is a former commander in chief of the 
Veterans of Foreign Wars. 
O 

Deceased — The late Senator Harold 
E. Cobourn, a graduate of the Law 
School in the class of '20, met an un- 
timely death as the result of an auto- 
mobile accident. He was a prominent 
member of the Cecil County Bar, and 
a well known political leader. At the 
time of his death he was the Maryland 
State Senator from Cecil County. 
O 

Married — Lenore Blount, '31, the ru- 
mors have it, is married and living in 
Hagerstown. 

O 

Watson in Insurance — A lacrosser of 
prominence enters the insurance field. 
George Watson, '38, an outstanding 
member of Jack Faber's stick wielders 
now is representing the State Mutual 
Life Assurance Co. of Massachusetts, 
with headquarters in the Baltimore 
Trust Bldg. George is a member of the 
Kappa Alpha fraternity, which he is 
a former president, as well as active 
in numerous other student affairs. 
O 

Science — For the past year Charles 
Paul Reichel, '33, has been in Chicago, 
111., as scientific aid with the U. S. D. A. 
Upon his recent return to Washington 
he immediately joined his battery in 
the 260 Coast Artillery reserves for 
their summer encampment in Southern 
Virginia. Charley is a member of 
Alpha Gamma Rho. 
O 

Married — A former editor of the 
Diamondback takes the matrimonial 
step. Mr. William Gibbs Myers, '30, 
and Miss Josephine Margaret Richards 
of New Haven, Conn. Both Mr. and 
Mrs. Myers are pursuing graduate 
studies at Yale. 

O 

Accountant — Hotel accounting and 
auditing is the present vocation of 
Mark Deskin, '37, a member of Tau 



Epsilon Phi. He is with the J. H. Ver- 
konteren firm, C. P. A.'s specializing 
in hotel accounting. 
O 

Canning — Robert F. Crump, '37, is 

with a canning company in the western 

part of Maryland. His home is in 

Frostburg. Bob said he liked the work. 

O 

To Wed — Ernestine Hammack, '34, 
and William Worley are to be married 
early in September. "Ernie" is a mem- 
ber of A. O. Pi and now lives in Col- 
lege Heights. Mr. Worley is connected 
with the National Geographic and re- 
sides in Hyattsville. 
O 

Fruit — Manager for the Berks-Le- 
high Mountain Fruit Growers Associa- 
tion of Pennsylvania is Lionel E. New- 
comer, '26. Lionel was formerly with 
the custom service in New York. 
O 

Milk — In the Washington milk shed 
of the Maryland-Virginia Milk Pro- 
ducers is Chester F. Bletch, '19. "Ches," 
a product of Washington City and a 
graduate in Agriculture, now helps 
contact the milk supply of the city. 
O 

To Wed— When? In the fall. Who? 
Ruth Knight, '38. To whom? Melton 
Peper, '35. The wedding will take 
place in Washington. 
O 

Birthday— On July 20, Prof. W. T. L. 
Taliaferro, retired professor of farm 
management, celebrated his 82th birth- 
day. The Kiwanis Club of Prince 
George County, of which he is a mem- 
ber, paid him special tribute at their 
weekly meeting. Congratulations, Pro- 
fessor Taliaferro, from your many Al- 
umni friends. 

O 

Brewery — One of the most promi- 
nent graduates in the 1938 class heads 
south to represent the National Brew- 
ing Company. He is none other than 
Jameson McWilliams, '38, a member of 
Phi Sigma Kappa and former business 
manager of the Terrapin and Diamond- 
back. He was also manager of boxing 
and a captain in the R. O. T. C. 
O 

Married — Carroll S. Anderson, Col- 
lege of Engineering, '36, and Miss An- 
jo Cole, of Baltimore, were married on 
Saturday morning, July 23, 1938, at 
10 o'clock, in Christ English Lutheran 
Church, Baltimore. Miss Vivian John- 



son, student at the University was 
maid of honor. The newly-weds will 
make their home in Arlington, N. J. 
Anderson was well known in football 
circles in the Brooklyn-Curtis Bay sec- 
tion of Baltimore previous to accept- 
ing a position with E. I. Du Pont de 
Nemours & Co. in 1936, by whom he 
is still employed. 

O 

Married — On June 12, Mary Frances 
Hala, '34, a grad in Arts and Science, 
married Dr. Anthony Poolny, of Long 
Island. Mrs. Poolny was an active 
member of student affairs and is re- 
membered for her contribution to wo- 
men athletics. Dr. Poolny is a grad 
of the Long Island College of Medicine 
and Lafayette College. At the latter 
he was a prominent member of the 
football squad. The newlyweds live on 
Long Island. The bride is a daughter 
of Dr. W. W. Hala, M.D., '05, a former 
captain of the football team of the 
Baltimore Schools. He is a member 
of the "M" Club and takes an active 
interest in the New York Alumni 
group. 

O 

Married — Word has reached us from 
the Palmetto State that Mary Taylor, 
'36, has leaped into the matrimonial 
world. On April 18, she married Mr. 
William Allison Fuller of Cornell, at 
Winter Haven, Fla. The newlyweds 
took a honeymoon trip abroad during 
the summer and upon their return they 
will reside in Florida, where Mr. Fuller 
is engaged in the orange business. 
Mary is a member of Alpha Xi Delta 
and formerly a dietician for the Wash- 
ington Health Center. 
O 

Claims Attorney — Promotion has 
been received by C. S. Archer, Jr., '30, 
who is with the Fidelity and Deposit 
Co. He is located in Atlanta, Ga., as 
assistant claims attorney. After grad- 
uation, Archer took up law, then bank- 
ing, finance and accounting. He is 
from Baltimore and is very much in- 
terested in Alumni activities and the 
Alumni News. His address is Atlanta, 
Ga., 622 Ten Pryor St. Building. 
O 

Married — Edward Francis Cane, '36, 
the well known K. A., took the leap, 
July 20, and married Miss Anne Cul- 
linance of Washington. They are re- 
siding at 5423 Colorado Avenue. 
O 

Y. M. C. A.— Boys' Work Director 
for the Y. M. C. A. in Plainfield, N. J., 
is Frank Terhune, '27, a member of 
Theta Chi and former member of the 
Diamondback staff. 



August, 193R 



Dr. Skinner, '95, 
Abroad 

During the past summer Dr. W. W. 
Skinner, '95, spent several weeks trav- 
eling for scientific information in the 
countries of France, Germany, Italy 
and Switzerland. He was accompanied 
by Mrs. Skinner. 

O 

Palestine — From Ram Allah in Pal- 
estine word has been received from 
Miss Elizabeth Haviland that she is 
transferring to Friends Mission, Kisu- 
mu, Kenya Colony, East Africa. She 
will be a teacher in the Friends Girls 
School. She expects to be there for at 
least three years before returning to 
the United States. 
O 

Teaching — Margaret Williams, '37, a 
member of Mortar Board, will be found 
teaching English at Montgomery-Blair 
High School in Silver Springs, Md. 
O 

Return — Charles Berry, formerly in 
New York, now is located in Wash- 
ington. 

O 

Visitors — Francis Wolfe, '27, and 
Lila Smith, '36, now Mrs. George Clen- 
daniel, recently paid the campus a vis- 
it. As both are Kappas they must 
have been looking over the new house 
and wishing they were returning to 
school this fall. 

O 

Wedding — In New Haven, Conn., 
Paul E. Mullinix, '36, found his bride, 
Miss Carolyn Roberta Young. They 
were married August 20 in New Haven. 
O 

Married — A Kappa Delta steps into 
the matrimonial pool, Jean Hamilton, 
'35, and Ralph Gray, '37. They were 
married August 9 at the First Presby- 
terian Church of Hyattsville. 
O* 

Engaged — Sometime this fall, if not 
before, Marguerite Mae Norris, '36, 
will wed Mr. Michael Murphy. Mar- 
guerite is a member of Kappa Kappa 
Gamma and resides in Chevy Chase, 
Md. 

O 

Takoma Park — Mr. and Mrs. Ste- 
phen Thoussen are living in Takoma 
Park, Md. Mrs. Thoussen is the for- 
mer Estelle Stanley of '35, and a mem- 
ber of Alpha Upsilon Chi. 
O 

Birth — Louise K. Eyler, '35, now 
Mrs. Roland Roycroft of Baltimore, 
and her husband announce the arrival 
of Douglas Roland, born February 12, 
this year. Calvert Debate Club and 



several Christian organizations re- 
member Louise's good work. 
O 

Real Estate— In Frederick, Md., C. 
Grayson Stevens, '36, is associated in 
real estate and insurance with P. Lu- 
ther Rice. 

"Steve" will be remembered for his 
cheerleading ability. 
O 

Commercial Engineer — For the Po- 
tomac Electric Power Company in 
Washington, D. C, we find J. Philip 
Schaefer, '23. He lives in Bethesda, Md. 
O 

Landscape — Josiah Shepard, '34, a 

graduate in agriculture, is a specialist 

in landscape architecture. He is located 

in Washington at 5510 Wisconsin Ave. 

O 

Marriage — An agriculture grad in 
the class of '32 takes the marriage 
step, Bowen Sinclair Crandall of Chevy 
Chase, Md. He married Miss Katherine 
Louise Turner of Nashville, Tenn., on 
Saturday, July 9, in a double ring 
ceremony. 

Mrs. Crandall is a graduate of Mis- 
sissippi State College. Mr. Crandall 
is junior pathologist in the Forestry 
Division of the U. S. D. A. 
O 

Ice Cream — Garnett Davis, '34, has 
entered the ice cream business and 
now is located with the Hood ice cream 
plant at Providence, R. I. Garnett was 
an active member of several agricul- 
ture societies on the campus, also made 
Phi Kappa Phi. 

O 

Charles Olivet — This past spring 
Charles Olivet met with an automobile 
accident while crossing the boulevard 
opposite Joe's Bar-B-Que. One leg was 
broken in two places and the rest of 
his body badly bruised. It is gratify- 
ing to report that Charley, a most 
familiar and popular figure to the Uni- 
versity campus, is doing nicely. His 
recovery is as rapid as can be expected, 
but we all look forward to seeing 
Charley on hand to greet the returning 
old grads at Homecoming this fall. 
O 

Etienne — Mr. and Mrs. A. D. Etienne 
are now living on Claggett Road, Col- 
lege Heights, Md. Arthur is a gradu- 
ate in chemistry with the class of 1920 
and now employed in the Treasury De- 
partment as a chemist. 
O 

Medicine — This year Walcott L. Eti- 
enne, '32, received his M. D. degree 
from George Washington University 
Medical School. He is a member of 
the A. T. 0. fraternity. 



Crothers, 29, Assisting 
Father In Politics 

A foi mer All Maryland football 
guard and one of the Old Line institu- 
tions outstanding athletes, Omar D. 
Crothers, Jr., '29, is assisting his fath- 
er in the race for the Attorney General 
nomination. 

Omar, a member of the Sigma Nu 
fraternity, is a prominent lawyer of 
Baltimore and Elkton, Md. He is a 
graduate also of the University's Law 
School in Baltimore. His father is an 
outstanding member of the Cecil Coun- 
ty Bar. 

O 

Married — Edward Francis Cane, '36, 
the well known K. A., took the leap 
July 20 and married Miss Ann Culli- 
nance of Washington. 
O 

Studying — Another alumna works 

for her master's degree in summer 

school, Dorothy Young, '26, a teacher 

at Bethesda-Chevy Chase High School. 

O 

Army — A recent report says that 
Robert N. Young, '21, former editor of 
the Diamondback and now a captain in 
the U. S. Army, has been transferred 
to Honolulu, Hawaii. "Bob" had one 
tour duty with the R. O. T. C. of the 
University as a member of the mili- 
tary staff. He is a member of K. A. 
fraternity and is treasurer of his class. 
O 

Married — A former Diamondback 
and Terrapin staff member is now mar- 
ried and living in Chicago. Elizabeth 
Louise (Betty) Benton, '37, of Silver 
Springs, Md. Betty married Mr. Leon 
Jacobson and they now reside at 6104 
Woodlawn Avenue, Chicago, 111. 
O 

Married — Captain John Banks Ber- 
ry, '17, U. S. Marine Corps Reserves, 
recently married Miss Mildred Van 
Valkenbugh Bunch of Arkansas. Cap- 
tain Berry is a member of the Kappa 
Alpha fraternity. The newlyweds will 
reside in Washington, D. C. 
O 

Landscape — An address unknown for 
some time spontaneously came to light. 
Charles S. Elliott, '20, formerly of 
Westover, Md., now is in Cincinnati, 
Ohio, at 1219 Inglenook Place, Hyde 
Park. 

O 

C. P. A. — Last February, Woodrow 
Wilson Rill, '33, of Hampstead, Md., 
acquired the degree of Certified Public 
Accountant. He now is with the firm 
of Ernst and Ernsts, a C. P. A. firm 
in Baltimore. 



10 



Maryland Alumni News 



Visitor — Among the summer visitors 
to the campus were Mrs. Marsh (nee 
Ruth Reppert, '23) and Francis Wolfe, 
'27. Both are members of Kappa Kap- 
pa Gamma. It was also found out from 
Ruth that she has another daughter, 
born January 11, and named Dorothy 
Ruth. 

Ruth said she was sorry to have 
missed Alumni Day, but it was impos- 
sible. She promises her class mates to 
do better on the next class reunion. 

O 
Musical — Engineer — Handling draft- 
ing implements and musical instru- 
ments must be somewhat the same. It 
is, to Richard W. Cooper, '35, who is a 
draftsman for the engineering depart- 
ment of the City of Salisbury and also 
leader of a popular dance orchestra. 
His accomplishments are commendable 
in both lines of endeavor. 

O 
Chemist — Test tubes and acids have 
been the life of Peter J. Valear, '35, of 
Washington, and now junior chemist 
for the National Institute of Health. 
He has also taken a chemical course 
at George Washington University. Pete 
was formerly a chemist for the Frank- 
fort Distilleries, Inc., of Baltimore, Md. 

O 
Community Chest — In the Informa- 
tion Bureau of the Community Chest is 
the former Miss Rhoda Lewton, '34, 
now Mrs. Jennings — married last De- 
cember. 

O 
Secretary — Another alumnus is on 
the campus in the capacity of a secre- 
tary, Miss Marjorie R. Mowatt, '33. 
She is in the office of Dr. McKenzie 
Stevens, dean of the College of Com- 
merce. 

O 
A. C. Turner, '34, is employed by 
S. D. Moses Co. of Washington, D. C. 
He is married and has a boy, A. C, Jr. 
and a girl, Carol Lynn. 

O 
James C. Greely, Jr., '32, is the proud 
father of a young daughter. The Gree- 
lys are residing at 85 Pleasant Street, 
Gloucester, Mass. 

O 
George David (Jim) Garber, '36, sup- 
plies the citizens of Frederick with 
fresh breadstuffs from the Garber 
Bakery. 

O 
Jack Herbsleb, '36, is working with 
the Standard Engineering Corporation. 

O 
Louis R. Hueper, '37, married Laura 
Gunby, '37. They are living at Berwyn, 
Md. 



Hon. J. F. B. Hyde, 
'15, Deceased 

One of our oldest and most loyal 
alumni died June 28, 1938, the Hon. 
John Francis Bird Hyde, 1875. 

Mr. Hyde was born in Calvert Coun- 
ty in 1854, entered the College Park 
Schools in 1871, graduated with the 
degree of B.S. He first went west fol- 
lowing graduation, but soon returned 
east, took over his father's farm, later 
to move to Baltimore, where he served 
with the Lerch Brothers, harness firm. 
His late years were spent with his 
daughter, Mrs. Charles B. Bishop of 
Baltimore. 

O 

Coast Guard — Commander of the 
Norfolk Division of the U. S. Coast 
Guard is Captain T. G. Crapster, '96. 
O 

Birth — Rumors have it that Peggy 
Wisner Parker, now living in Pitts- 
burgh, has a daughter, born February 
5 last. 

O 

Church — Former assistant Rector J. 
Lawrence Plumley, '33, at Trinity Epis- 
copal Church in Houston, Tex., now is 
the rector in charge of Holy Compostic 
Episcopal Church and St. Paul's Epis- 
copal Church at Freeport, Tex. He 
graduated from the University of the 
South at Sewanee in 1936. 

Lawrence was president of his class 
in his junior year and treasurer in his 
senior year at College Park. 
O 

Entomologist — In the U. S. D. A., 
George Becker, '08, is an entomologist. 
His class celebrates its thirtieth an- 
niversary this year. 
O 

Medicine — Practicing medicine and 
surgery in Reisterstown, Md., is Dr. 
D. Delmas Caples, '30, M. D., '34. 
Dr. Caples, following his intern work, 
was assistant resident surgeon at the 
Franklin Square Hospital. 
O 

Construction — In Boston, Mass., 
Jerry H. Sullivan, '21, is the vice-presi- 
dent of George A. Fuller Construction 
Company. 

O 

Accounting — In the Social Security 
Internal Revenue Tax Division is Regi- 
nal Burroughs, Jr., '37. He was form- 
erly in the accounting department of 
Chemical Pigments. 
O 

Warren Evans, '36, is teaching Phys- 
ical Education at Frederick High 
School, Md. 



George A. Wick, '23, of 5023 Illinois 
Ave., N. W., Washington, D. C, is 
chief engineer for Rosslyn Steel and 
Cement Co. 

O 

Ernest Gillette Davis, '24, was re- 
cently married. Ernie is an engineer 
with the Treasury Department and is 
residing in Ephrata, Penn. 
O 

James Leroy Dougall, '25, is still 
with the Washington Loan and Trust 
Co., West End Branch of Washington, 
D. C. 

• 

Richmond Is Tough 
For Terp Gridders 

(Continued from. Page 1) 

Terp grid great who did a good deal 
of the scouting, is just recovering from 
a serious operation and will not be 
available during the 1938 campaign. 
Mack was an ace at the job and more 
experienced than the other two who 
also are highly capable in the art of 
deciphering the other fellow's stuff. 

Maryland's first two foes cannot be 
scouted. Richmond, like Maryland, will 
play its opener on its visit to College 
Park on September 24 and Penn State 
will be staging its inaugural when the 
Terps travel to State College on Oc- 
tober 1. 

Maryland will have a junior varsity 
this year which will play several 
games, one of which already has been 
arranged with the Penn "B" squad. 

Landing Safely 

(Continued from Page 5) 

crash. Landing safely didn't mean 
anything but a crash that would be 
unusual. 

Happy Landing 

The final note to his passenger and 
then get set. He signaled the ground 
crew and then he set his ship down 
with a minimum damage. "It was 
a happy landing," said Bob. 

His commanding officer was in an- 
other plane accompanying him on the 
trip, and had a vacant seat. Bob crawl- 
ed in with him and went on to San 
Diego. Bob says he still likes it. 

His passenger then had to hitch 
hike the rest of the way by auto. 
Tough on him. 

e 

"But will you love me when my hair 
has turned to silver?" 

"Why not?" Haven't I stuck with 
you thru brown, red, and black?" 



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Copyright 1938, Liggett & Mvers Tobacco Co. 



M 



ARYLAND 



A 



LUMNI 



N 



EWS 



SEPTEMBER 
1938 





HOMECOMING 



Homecoming Scenes, 1937 



» 



» 



» 



Saturday, October 29, 1938 

Maryland vs V. M. I., 2:30 

BYRD STADIUM « * COLLEGE PARK 



Reserved Seats, $1.50 



General Admission, 75c 



Seasons Schedule: 



>eason 



Tickets: 



Sept. 24— Richmond College Park 

$1.10 55c 

Oct. 1— Penn State State College, Pa. 

Oct. 8 — Syracuse Syracuse, N. Y. 

Oct. 15— Western Maryland Balto., Md. 

$1.65 $1.10 
Oct. 22— Virginia College Park 

$1.50 75c 
Oct. 29 — V. M. I. (Homecoming) College Park 

$1.50 75c 

Nov. 12 — Florida Gainesville, Fla. 

Nov. 19 — Georgetown College Park 

$1.65 $1.10 

Nov. 24 — Washington and Lee Balto., Md. 

$1.65 $1.10 

Prices include any taxes in all instances. All games sta 
9 Applications for- advanced reservations should be made 
Add fifteen (15c) cents to any order if yon desire your tickets 



9 The Athletic Board has made available for those Alumni 
ivho attend every home game a special season book which 
will save the price of one game. The season book will cost 
an Alumnus six ($6.00) dollars (tax included) and will be 
good for the following games: Richmond, Virginia, V. M. I., 
Georgetown, and Washington and Lee. There will be a 
coupon in the book for each game which will be exchange- 
able for a top-priced reserved seat ticket. Other tickets may 
be purchased at the established game price to accompany 
the holder of a season book. All applications for season 
books must be made with the Athletic Office at College Park, 
on or before September 24. No refunds will be made on 
any season book and unused coupons will not be exchanged 
for subsequent games. 

rt at 2:30 P. M., except Georgetown at 2 o'clock. 

to the Athletic Office, University of Maryland, College Park. 

sent by registered mail. 



MARYLAND ALUMNI NEWS, SEPTEMBER, 1938 



Number 4 



Alumni Association-University of Maryland 



Founded in 1892 

♦ 

Officers for 1938-39 

C. WALTER COLE, '21, President 

Towson, Md. 



Charles W. Sylvester, '08, Vice-President 
Baltimore, Md. 



G. F. Pollock, '23, Sec-Treasurer 
College Park, Md. 



Alumni Board 

(Note — The officers named above are also members of the Alumni Board) 
Reuben Brigham, '08, P. W. Chichester, '20, Education 

Arts and Sciences John A. Silkman, '35, Agriculture 

Charles V. Koons, '29, Engineering Ruth Miles, '31, Home Economics 

Members at Large 

Esther Hughes Lee, '33, Women's Rep. J. Donald Kieffer, '30, Men's Rep. 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Editor 

Maryland Alumni News, issued monthly by the University of Maryland 
Alumni Association at College Park, Md., as second-class matter under the Act 
of Congress of March 3, 1879. 

Annual Alumni Association dues are $2.00. One year's subscription to 
Alumni News, 50 cents. 

Group Leaders 

Allegany County: E. Brooke Whiting, '98, President; Dr. Joseph Franklin, '21, Secretary, Cum- 
berland, Md. 

Baltimore County: C. Walter Cole, '21, President; H. B. Derrick, '17, Secretary, Towson, Md. 

Baltimore City: Chester Tawney, '31, President, 4022 Roland Avenue; E. Gordon Hammond, '34, 
Secretary, 1023 W. Barre Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Caroline County: George W. Clendaniel, '20, President, Denton; Dr. Maurice A. Brackett, '21, 
Treasurer, Denton ; Mrs. George W. Clendaniel, '21, Secretary, Denton. 

Harford County: W. B. Munnikhuysen, '14, President; H. M. Carroll, '20, Secretary, Bel Air, Md. 

Frederick County: J. Homer Remsberg, '18, President; Henry R. Shoemaker, '17, Secretary, 
Frederick, Md. 

Montgomery County: Lawrence G. Smoot, '18, President, Kensington, Md. ; Mary Fisher, '36, 
Secretary, Rockville, Md. 

New York City: Donald Kieffer, '30, President, 195 Broadway; Sarah Morris, '25, Secretary, 
140 E. 63rd Street, New York City. 

Philadelphia: A. Moulton McNutt. '06, President, 413 Cooper Street, Camden, N. J.; J. P. Mudd, 
'07, Secretary, 173 Manheim Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pittsburg: E. Minor Wenner, '27, President, 1111 Gladys Avenue; Dr. A. A. Krieger, '32, Sec- 
retary, Highland Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Washington, D. C: J. Douglas Wallop, '19, President. 6139 N. Dakota Avenue, N. W. ; Charles V. 
Koons, '29, Secretary, 419 Fourth Street, N. E., Washington. 

Washington County: Hon. Henry Holzapfel, Jr., '93, President, Hagerstown, Md. ; L. G. Mathias, 
'23, Secretary, Hagerstown, Md. 

"M" Club Officers and Board Members 

President — Dr. A. A. Parker, '04. Secretary-Treas. — Dr. E. N. Cory, '09. 

Vice-President— Donald H. Adams, '28. Historian— Bob Hill, '26. 



REPRESENTATIVES 



Baseball— G. F. Pollock. '23. 
Basket-ball— H. B. Shipley, '14. 
Boxing — Victor Wingate, '35. 
Lacrosse — James Stevens, '19. 
Track— Lewis W. Thomas, '28. 



Tennis — James Shumate, '17. 
Cross Co. — Charles Remsberg, '26. 
Football — Kirk Besley. '23. 
At Large— Dr. E. B. Friedenwald, '03. 
Dr. A. W. Valentine, '04. 



Cover Picture 

Shows the beginning of another 
school year where fellow meets fellow 
and Boy meets Girl. This picture is 
taken on the Library steps which faces 
the open campus toward the east and 
students catch the warmth of the au- 
tumn sun between classes. It is also 
the center of campus happenings and 
interest. In the basement of the Li- 
brary is the book store and post office. 
The Registrar and Administrations are 
on the first floor. 



Alumni Accord 

By President C. Walter Cole, '21 

/~VNE of the indispensible agencies of 
a university should be its alumni 
group. In the first place, this group, 
naturally, is fundamentally interested 
in its Alma Mater. In the second place, 
particularly in the instance of a uni- 
versity of long standing, its graduates 
have become widespread and consist of 
men and women prominent in their re- 
spective com- 
munities. The 
graduate group 
is the life-blood 
of many uni- 
versities, and 
when any pro- 
gram or objec- 
tive of serious 
concern and 
consequence to 
the university 
has been un- 
dertaken, this 
group has been 
one of the potent factors supporting 
it. We have many instances of this 
in well-known educational institutions 
throughout the nation. 

It seems inconceivable that any act 
by the university or its staff officers, 
vitally affecting it, should be under- 
taken without the Board of Regents 
and the Alumni, through its officers, 
first approving it. This is true if it 
is to be expected that the alumni, as 
a group, will fully cooperate in pro- 
moting and boosting the university. 

We have prided ourselves in recent 
years that our alumni, as a group, 

(Continued on I'agc 4) 




Maryland Alumni News 



Homecoming 
Saturday, October 29 

Even before school opens plans were 
being formulated for another gala 
Homecoming. Last year it was the 
greatest in history, brought about by 
alumni, faculty and student coopera- 
tion. Fraternity and Sorority joined 
in spreading hospitality to returning 
graduates and visitors. Each house 
was decorated in a very hospitable 
fashion. Prizes were given for the 
most attractive as well as humorous 
decoration. 

Between the halves of the football 
game a grand competitive parade of 
floats was presented by various stu- 
dent organizations. More than 15 or- 
ganizations participated in a most 
colorful spectacle. 

All of this is expected to be repeated 
this year with even greater success 
than last. 

In addition the usual popular Alumni 
Mixer following the game will be held 
in the girls' field house for alumni, 
faculty and their friends. Fraternity 
and Sorority houses will have open 
house for their returning alumni. Last 
year the mixer and each fraternity 
and sorority was filled to capacity. 
Here is where friendships and fellow- 
ship had its biggest boost. 

The climax of the day was the Prize 
Homecoming Ball in the spacious Rit- 
chie Coliseum. The only dance held 
there during the year. Those who do 
not attend Homecoming are the losers. 
As one alumnus who attended his first 
Homecoming in ten years said, "It is 
my first but I shall never miss an- 
other." The date is October 29, 1938. 
Maryland vs Virginia Military Insti- 
tute, the West Point of the South. 
• 

Samoa Bound 

When you marry into the military 
circles you look for foreign travel and 
this is what former Rosalie Goodhart 
is now doing. She married Lieutenant 
James F. Dietz, U. S. Navy and he has 
been ordered to Tutuila, Samoa. With 
them they have their young daughter, 
Rosalie Johanna, born December 7. 

Mrs. Dietz is a member of A. 0. Pi 
and graduated in 1932. For several 
years the Dietz family lived in Arling- 
ton, Virginia. 

• 

Traveling — A graduate nurse goes 
traveling. Miss Ira Seipts, '34, is tra- 
veling in South America. 



General Riggs, Regent 
Died Recently 

General Clinton L. Riggs, member of 
a family that has been prominent in 
Maryland affairs for many years, died 
September 12 in Baltimore, one day 
before his seventy-third birthday. He 
had been a very active member of the 
Board of Regents for several years and 
intensely interested in the agriculture 
developments of the State. His Fox- 
hall Farm, at Wilkens Avenue and 
Rolling Road, was a beautiful colonial 
estate. Here he carried out his the- 
ories of modern agriculture. 

General Riggs was a soldier and a 
statesman. He served in the Maryland 
National Guard during the Spanish 
American War, was later appointed 
Adjutant General of Maryland, during 
which time the great fire of Baltimore 
occurred. He has served as one of the 
commissioners of the Philippine Is- 
lands. For many years he was active 
in the real estate business in Baltimore. 

He was a graduate of Princeton Uni- 
versity in civil engineering in the class 
of 1887, but took graduate work in 
political economy. At the time of his 
death he was president of the Mary- 
land Historical Society. 

Alumni Accord 

(Continued from Page 3) 

have manifested a keener interest in 
the university. It was and is our am- 
bition that the establishment of an 
alumni headquarters on the campus at 
College Park will further stimulate 
this interest, and that all alumni will 
look forward to frequent returns to 
the campus with a spirit of ready co- 
operation and assistance, if needed. Re- 
cently, an occurrence has taken place 
in connection with the university which 
has caused a deluge of communications 
to come to me. These were, and are, 
of one accord. They show the keen 
interest of the alumni in their univer- 
sity, and when the occasion arises, that 
they are a positive and firm group to- 
ward promoting its best interests. It 
is our belief and hope for the good of 
the university that such occurrences 
are in the past, and I appeal earnestly 
to all alumni to rally to the support 
of the association in a greater effort 
than ever to make the University of 
Maryland the high type of institution 
we desire. 

President Byrd has done much to 
develop the university in every way 
which, strictly as president, he is well 



Dr. Homer C. House 
Succumbs 

While on a vacation trip through the 
west Dr. Homer C. House, well-known 
Professor of English, died suddenly in 
Pasadena, California. 

Doctor House was a student, teacher, 
poet and scholar. He was a husband, 
father and friend in no uncertain 
terms. His philosophy radiated 
throughout the student body. His love 
for music was inspiring and during the 
years at the University, since 1920, he 
did much to help spread the enthusi- 
asm for music. His philosophy of life 
was to develop the contacts and appre- 
ciations of the best in life and thus to 
grow spiritually. 

He is survived by his widow, Mrs. 
Lillian Chase House, and four sons, all 
of whom are alumni of the University 
of Maryland. Dr. Hugh Osgood, '24, 
Kinsley, '26, Bolton, '31, and Arthur 
Browning, '33. 

Interment was made in Peru, Nebr. 
• 

Marries — Another union between A. 
0. Pi and Sigma Nu took place when 
Muriel James, '37, and Carleton W. 
(Bud) Wahl, '37, were married Septem- 
ber 1, in Chevy Chase, Maryland. 
• 

Teacher — Home Economics is the 
subject being taught by Edith Bell, 
'37, at Williamsport High School. 
Edith is a member of Alpha Xi Delta. 
Her brother entered Maryland this fall. 
• 

Mosquitoes — Assistant Entomolo- 
gist Walter Anthony Connell, '33, of 
the U. S. D. A. is engaged in the Mos- 
quito Control Investigation. 
• 

Pipe Organs — In the pipe organ 
business with headquarters in Wash- 
ington is Edgar B. Newcomer, '34, a 
member of the Delta Sigma Phi fra- 
ternity. He is a partner in the New- 
comer Organ Company. 

capable of carrying on to greater 
heights. I am sure that every alum- 
nus wishes him well as our distin- 
guished president and at all times will 
come to his support in the interest of 
the university. Again I urge your ac- 
tive cooperation, with the assurance 
that with your support the Alumni 
Association will become one of the 
most dependable forces for good of 
the university. 



A Football Message 

to 
Maryland Men 

It gives The Atlantic Refining Company great pleasure to announce 
that it will broadcast most of Maryland's 1938 football games. 

These broadcasts will be dignified, accurate and entertaining. 
Commentators have been chosen both for their knowledge of foot- 
ball and for their recognized ability in radio broadcasting. Adver- 
tising commercials will be used sparingly and in good taste — never 
while a game is in progress. 

We sincerely hope that those of you who cannot go to the 
games will tune in one of the stations listed below. We feel sure 
that some exciting football afternoons are in store for you. 



THE ATLANTIC REFINING COMPANY 

PETROLEUM PRODUCTS 



GAMES TO BE 


BROADCAST 


SEPTEMBER 24 RICHMOND 


OCTOBER 22 V/RG/NM 


OCTOBER 1 PENN STATE 


NOVEMBER 12 FLORIDA 


lAt State College) 


I At Gainesville! 


OCTOBER 8 SYRACUSE 


NOVEMBER 19 ..GEORGETOWN 


lAt Syracuse! 




NOVEMBER 24. .. 


.WASH. & LEE 


1 At Baltimore 1 


BALTIMORE WCAO 


HAGERSTOWN WJEJ 


SALISBURY 


WSAL 




as 

so 

a 



Z 

a: 

o 



Maryland Alumni News 



« 



OLD LINE ATHLETICS 



» » 



By W. H. ("Bill") HOTTEL 



Terps With Record Squad ~\ave Power 

M: 



ARYLAND'S varsity grid squad, 
having toiled since September 1, 
is in pretty good trim for its opening 
game with the University of Richmond 
at College Park on the 24th. 

More than 50 aspirants, the largest 
array in the history of the school, is 
under the wing of Head Coach Frank 
Dobson and his two Maryland aides, 
Jack Faber and Al Heagy. From the 
standpoint of general strength the ag 
gregation doubtless is the best the 
Terps ever have had. 

However, graduation of Bill Wolf 1 
and Mike Surgent, a great pair o 
guards, Blair Smith, an exceptional 
end, and a number of others left gaps 
that are not easily filled, especially in 
a short space of time. But the material 
is on hand and it will be developed in 
due time. 

Two Main Problems 

It is particularly difficult to get a 
running guard of the caliber of Sur 
gent and a pass-snagging end to match 
Smith. These are the main problems 
that occupy the coaches. 

As the opening of the campaign 
neared it appeared as if John De- 
Armey, a junior who was injured be- 
fore the season began last fall, and 
George Gienger, a soph who played 
his first football as a Maryland fresh- 
man, would fill the first eleven guard 
jobs. Francis Beamer, who broke a 
finger in the Penn game last October 
1 and was out for the rest of the 1937 
campaign, is holding down Smith's old 
job on the wing. All have the physical 
attributes. 

Otherwise there are letter men in all 
of the other positions, with the start- 
ing backfield being filled with "M" 
men. 

Dobson feels that his starting eleven 
will not be quite as strong as in 1937 
but that the general strength of the 
squad is much greater and that he will 
not have to make "iron men" out of 
his linemen or backs as he had to do 
with some of them last fall. 

Sophs Are Prominent 

Sophomores will provide most of the 



Sreserve strength, with Joe Murphy, 
|Dick Shaffer and Joe Devlin, all track 
jjmen, adding a great deal of speed to 

the backfield that was not possessed 
llast year. All are clever. This trio 
Jwith Pershing Mondorff, a letter man, 
[provide a great relief set of backs. 

Rip Hewitt, another letter man back, 
j.vill be chief utility man, a highly im- 
Sportant role, as he must know the re- 
quirements of three positions both on 
jthe offense and defense. Bob Brand, 

5till another "M" back, also will be 
jvaluable for all-around duty. 

Here is the way the first two teams 
jjwere lining-up when this was written: 

First Pos. Second 

Beamer L. E xBlazek 

S*Brown L. T xBright 

DeArmey L. G Lloyd 

'Forrester Center xSmith 

jjxGiengrer R. G Lawrence 

j*Albarano R. T xCochrane 

*Budkoff R. E xDwyer 

^♦Weidinger Q. B xMurphy 

*Meade L. H xShaffer 

*Skotnicki R. H xDevlin 

♦Boyda F. B *Mondorff 



* Letter men. x Sophomores. 

Four of the men in these two line- 
ups never played football before com- 
ing to Maryland — Forrester, Gienger, 
Rudy, Cochrane and Mondorff. 

• 

Riggs Made Coach 
Of Junior Varsity 

Maurice Talbott (Todie) Riggs, who 
was graduated from Maryland in the 
class of 1920, will coach the Terp jun- 
ior varsity squad, something new in 
football at College Park. 

Todie, who played four years of base- 
ball for Maryland, was an all-State and 
all-South Atlantic end in football on 
the 1919 eleven. He also was on the 
track team for one season. 

Riggs started his coaching at Suf- 
folk, Va., High School and was there 
for a number of years before going to 
St. John's College of Annapolis in 1927 
as football coach and athletic director. 
He remained at St. John's until the end 



Richmond Tough 
For Opening Clash 

When this was written, Richmond 
U.'s football team, the Terp's foe in 
their opening game on September 24, 
appeared to be a tough nut to crack. 

The Spiders, tutored by Glenn This- 
tlewaite, who has been coaching foot- 
ball for 31 years, have a veteran for 
nearly every position, both in the line 
and backfield, and has some sophs who 
add much strength. Andy Fronczek, a 
big tackle from Chicago, is the only 
soph sure of a starting berth. 

Their only complaint thus far is that 
they need a little more reserve strength 
in the tackle and guard jobs. 

Thistlewaite is particularly pleased 
over the outlook for a strong and ver- 
satile attack, as he has seven veteran 
backs, and some newcomers who com- 
bine to give him a powerful running 
and passing offense. In fact, he will 
bank a great deal on throwing the ball 
to upset the Terps and other rivals. 
He also has plenty of good booters 
among the backs. 

Capt. A. B. Marchant, who plays end, 
is one of the best men in this position 
in the Southern Conference. 

The team, which is using the single 
wingback type of offense, will have 
unusual speed and will be moderately 
heavy, with some real big boys in sev- 
eral of the places. 

of the 1935 campaign. While there he 
also coached basket-ball for a couple 
of seasons. 

He was in business for a time after 
leaving St. John's and this fall is tak- 
ing up the position as physical director 
at Kensington, Md., High School, which 
is only a short drive from College Park. 

Todie and Geary Eppley, Maryland's 
athletic director, were teammates on 
the wings for the 1919 Terp eleven. 

Riggs also played professional ball 
after gruadating, being an outstanding 
performer for Norfolk in the old Vir- 
ginia League. 

The junior varsity will play a sched- 
ule of three games, two of which have 
been arranged. Potomac State will be 
engaged at Cumberland on October 22 
and the Penn junior varsity will invade 
College Park on October 28. 



September, 1938 



Maryland's 1938 Varsity Football Squad 



» 



» 



» 



' 17 -*> J- 





First row, top, (left to right) — Mintzer, Minion, Sedlak, Davis, Morris, Knitst, J. Mueller, Wood, Hess, Heyer, Lums- 

den, IT". Miller, Neilson, Morton, Ochsenreiter, Widener, 
Second row — Kncpley, Nagor, Abell, Gianger, Albarano, Cohen, Brand, Lloyd, Lawrence, Devlin, Kronse, Fox, Race, 
Third row — De Armey, Mondorff, Boyda, Hewitt, Budkoff, Beamer, Meade, Skotnieki, Brown, Blazek, Dwyer, 
Fourth row — Shaffer, McNeill, Forrester, Cochrane, Murphy, Bengoeehea, Weidinger, Rudy, Smith. 



Name Pos. Ht. 

45— *Nick Budkoff end 6 

46 — Francis Beamer end 6-2% 

37 George Lawrence end 6-1% 

61 — *Robert Brown tackle 6-1 

60 — *Ralph Albarano tackle 6 

51 — Arthur Rudy guard G 

55- John DeArmey guard 5-8 

30 — Edward Lloyd guard 5-11 

53 — *Jim Forrester center 5-11 

44 — *Charlie Weidinger .... back 5-10 

48 — *Jim Meade back 6-1 

23— *Fred Hewitt back 5-11 

50 — *Pershing Mondorff.... back 5-11 

47 *John Boyda back 6 

18— *Frank Skotnieki back 5-10 

35 -*Robert Brand back 6-1 

22 tAdam Berngoechea... back 5-8 

* Letter men. f Not out last year. 







Yrs. on 


wt. 


Age 


Squad 


187 


21 


3 


1S3 


21 


2 


184 


22 


2 


216 


20 


2 


198 


23 


2 


197 


25 


2 


187 


23 


2 


179 


22 


2 


175 


20 


3 


177 


21 


3 


190 


24 


3 


161 


22 


3 


190 


20 


2 


188 


22 


2 


168 


20 


2 


168 


20 


2 


131 


21 


1 



High School Home 

Classical Lynn, Mass. 

Roosevelt Washington. D. C. 

Fr. and Mar. Acad Hanover, Pa. 

W. Hazelton W. Hazelton. Pa. 

Lilly Lilly, Pa. 

Middletown Middletown, Md. 

Windber Windber, Pa. 

Western Washington, D. C. 

Hyattsville Berwyn. Md. 

McDonogh Baltimore, Md. 

Tome Port Deposit. Md. 

Baltimore City College.. ..Balto., Md. 

Emmitsburg Emmitsburg, Md. 

Vocational Iselin, Pa. 

W. Hazelton W. Hazelton. Pa. 

Eastern Washington, D. C. 

Ogden Chevy Chase, Md. 



Varsity Football List 

September 24 -University of Richmond at Col- 
lege Park. 

October 1—Penn State College at State Col- 
lege, Pa. 

October 8 — Syracuse University at Syracuse. 
New York. 

October 15 — Western Maryland College at Bal- 
timore Stadium. 

October 22 — University of Virginia at College 
Park. 

October 29 — (Homecoming) Virginia Military 
Institute at College Park. 

November 12 University of Florida at Gaines- 
ville. Fla. I Florida's Home- 
coming.) 

November 19 — Georgetown University at Col- 
lege Park. 

November 24 (Thanksgiving) — Washington and 
Lee at Baltimore Stadium. 
All games will start at 2 :30, except George- 
town game, which will begin at 2 o'clock. 



Leading Prospects From 1937 Freshmen 



Name Pos. 

53 — Frank Dwyer end 

41 — Frank Blazek end 

56 — William Krouse tackle 

59 Robert Cochrane tackle 

54 George Gienger guard 

27— Abe Cohen guard 

39— Paul McNeill guard 

40 — Elmer Bright guard-tackle 

38 — Robert Smith center 

20- Joe Murphy back 

29— "Joe Devlin back 

36 — Richard Shaffer back 

21 — Fred Widener back 



** Ineligible last year. 



Ht. 


Wt. 


Agt 


6-2 


174 


21 


6-1 


190 


19 


6-2 


233 


21 


6 


202 


20 


6 


201 


24 


5-11% 


190 


19 


6 


180 


18 


5-11 


200 


20 


5-11 


180 


21 


5-10 


152 


21 


5-11 


170 


21 


6-3 


175 


19 


5-10 


165 


19 



High School Home- 
Forest Park Baltimore, Md. 

Poly Baltimore. Md. 

Western Chevy Chase, Md. 

Forest Park Baltimore. Md. 

Scottsville Brentwood. Md. 

Eastern Washington, D. C. 

Kingston Baltimore, Md. 

Poly Baltimore. Md. 

Tome Woodbyne. N. J. 

Tome Carney's Point, N. J. 

Mt. St. Joe Baltimore, Md. 

Ferndale Denton. Md. 

Balto. City College Balto., Md. 



Others on squad will play as junior varsity, with a schedule of three or four games. Some of 
varsity squad members may be demoted and junior varsity men promoted during the progress of 
the season, depending, of course, on the caliber of their play. 



Freshman Grid Card 

October 21 — Washington and Lee Freshmen at 

Lexington. 
October 28— V. M. I. Freshmen at College 

Park. I A.M.) 
November 5 — George Washington Freshmen at 

College Park. 
November 11 -Western Maryland Freshmen at 

College Park. 
November 18 Georgetown Freshmen at College 

Park. 



Baseball — Eddie Johnson, president 
of the Student government for 1938-39, 
played baseball this summer for his 
"Dad" the well known Walter Johnson. 
Eddie was short stop for Dr. Pepper's 
amateur nine of the District of Colum- 
bia. 



Maryland Alumni News 



Applications Indicate 
Big Enrollment 

When the News went to press sever- 
al days before registration, the appli- 
cations for new admission were fifty 
per cent ahead of last year. All in- 
dications were that the freshman class 
would exceed the 1,000 mark for the 
first time in history. 

Going back a couple of years the 
applications were seventy-five per cent 
ahead of 1936 and still coming in. 

Each department is making hasty 
plans to accommodate the increase in 
the normal schedule of classes. "What 
if the registration is so large that we 
will have to schedule night classes?" 
said a faculty member. If they want 
the education it is our duty to give 
them every opportunity even at a 
sacrifice to ourselves. 

There is also another very impor- 
tant indication in the increased en- 
rollment. Under the new system only 
those students having satisfactory 
high school records are granted im- 
mediate admission. Many others have 
had to take entrance exams, in which 
the success has been about fifty per 
cent. All of this is for the improve- 
ment of the educational system and 
adds much to the prestige of the Uni- 
versity. 

This system has had its effect back 
in the high schools where students who 
plan to attend college are doing better 
work. With this the interest in col- 
lege has increased and there are great- 
er demands today for a higher edu- 
cation. 

Alumni are concentrating their at- 
tention on the outstanding students in 
the various high schools. Thus keeping 
pace with the rapid developments of 
their Alma Mater. 
• 

Lacrosse Star 
Marries 

A former lacrosse star for the 
Terrapins, Frederick W. Invernizzi, 
'32, and Miss Virginia Budd Taylor of 
Baltimore, were married September 2. 
Fred's prominence as a goalie for Jack 
Faber's stick wielders is well remem- 
bered. Since his athletic days, Fred 
has graduated from the University 
Law School in '35, and two years later 
became a member of the faculty. The 
newlyweds will be at home after Oc- 
tober 1 at 4327 Marble Hall Road, 
Baltimore. 



Campus Developments 

When the 1938-39 term opened at 
College Park, returning students view- 
ed many changes and new students 
looked upon an improved campus. 

The ragged edges of the campus 
roads have received a manicuring and 
now an eight-inch curbing will protect 
the green velvet grass. The curbings 
are complete about the Library and as 
far as the main gateway, adding 
much to the campus dignity. As you 
approach the Dining Hall the barren 
slope on the left has received a new 
dressing of sod and grading, adding to 
the friendly approach among the state- 
ly oaks. 

As the roadway improvements pro- 
gressed the Gym approach was given 
a revamping with a wide concrete 
spread, broken up by brick rectangles, 
between the steps and the road. Inside 
the Gym, the wavy floor has been made 
level and dressed so that it now looks 
like a ball room. 

New Infirmary 

Among the most outstanding de- 
velopments was the breaking of ground 
on the new million-dollar building 
program. The renovation and addition 
to the infirmary was started by Pres. 
H. C. Byrd as he turned the first shovel 
full of sod. Many other buildings will 
follow just as soon as plans are com- 
pleted. 

Down near the boulevard the well- 
known Rossburg Inn is undergoing a 
restoration to eventually be the campus 
club for alumni and faculty. This 
building is the oldest landmark on the 
campus. Its history goes back to the 
days of the stage coach and George 
Washington. 

• 

Alumni Representatives 

In making plans for a gala Home- 
coming, more than 75 alumni repre- 
sentatives from all counties in the 
State were invited to College Park for 
a meeting on September 24. The repre- 
sentatives were the presidents of the 
various organized groups, and County 
Chairman in those sections where 
groups are to be organized. 

The alumni program for the year 
calls for three outstanding gatherings: 
Homecoming, Saturday, October 29, at 
College Park, Charter Day Celebra- 
tion, January 20, in Baltimore, the 132 
birthday of the University, then Alum- 
ni Day in the spring of the year. 

Each alumnus is a committee of one 
to see that the enthusiasm for these 
gatherings will attract a large return 
of old graduates. 



Reverend Plumley 
Accepts Call 

Rev. Walter P. Plumley, '29, for the 
past six years Vicar of St. John's, Mt. 
Ranier, Maryland, left in September 
for Haddon Heights, New Jersey, 
where he will become Rector of St. 
Mary's Church. 

The following excerpts are taken 
from the Washington Diocese: 

"Mr. and Mrs. Plumley have en- 
deared themselves to the people of the 
Diocese and they will be greatly 
missed. During Mr. Plumley's minis- 
try at St. John's the Church has made 
remarkable progress and his influence 
for good and the advancement of 
Christian living has been distinctly 
felt in the entire community. 

"Mr. Plumley was also active in Dio- 
cesan affairs being a member of the 
Executive Council, the Department of 
Religious Education and the Depart- 
ment of Publicity. He was also closely 
identified with the Young Peoples' Fel- 
lowship. 

"St. Mary's Church, Haddon Heights, 
located in Camden County, New Jer- 
sey, is in a large community of homes 
where we are sure Mr. and Mrs. Plum- 
ley will find a hearty welcome and 
sincere appreciation for their work 
there." 

Walter is a former track man, a 
Lieutenant in the R. 0. T. C, a mem- 
ber of the Debate Club and Theta Chi. 
His able leadership as a student will 
be long remembered. The best of 
wishes to you, Walter. 

Marylanders Meet 
In North Carolina 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Alfred Kay, '35 and 
'31, are now in North Carolina, where 
Al was transferred as southern repre- 
sentative for the Mercer Textile Mills. 
He was formerly in Trenton, N. J. His 
southern territory includes Virginia, 
North Carolina, South Carolina, Geor- 
gia, Alabama, Tennessee and Florida. 
The Kays will reside in Greensboro, 
North Carolina. Mrs. Kay, formerly 
Eleanor Baumel, '31, says there's wel- 
come on the mat for all Marylanders. 

Eleanor writes that a coincident oc- 
curred recently when they took Al, Jr., 
to a doctor in Greensboro and there in 
his office they found his University of 
Maryland diploma adorning the wall. 
He is Dr. Marion Yates Keith, a well- 
known pediatrician. There was much 
to talk about from then on. 



September, 1938 



Marylanders 
Marching On 



When the final figures were compiled 
at the summer R. 0. T. C. camp at 
Fort Geo. Meade, it was found that the 
Maryland boys figure quite prominent- 
ly in the awards. President Byrd 
visited the camp and presented the 
honors. 

Here are the Maryland honors: For 
rifle marksmanship, Lewis A. Jones 
and Charles Weidinger, for pistol 
marksmanship; W. P. Davis, F. T. 
Bishop and R. W. Adams. 

Boxing honors went to Benjamin 
Alperstein in the 145-pound class and 
Frank Cronin, 155-pound class. Horse- 
shoe pitching battalion honor to Ned 
Oakley single and the double team hon- 
ors, Ned Oakley and Van S. Ashmun. 
Swimming — 220 yard free sytle and 
100 yard back stroke, John W. Stevens. 
Diving was won by Lewis A. Jones. 
Volley-ball team honors, U. of Md. 
with Henry Essex, Robert W. Adams, 
Fred "Rip" Hewit and Fred Bishop 
making up the team. Benjamin Alper- 
stein wins another bout but this time 
it is wrestling. Maryland boys won 
just about one-third of all the honors 
awarded. 



Homecoming 



As the autumn shadows creep across 
the campus and the brilliant colors of 
nature acknowledge the turning of the 
season, alumni also change their 
thoughts from vacation to the great 
collegiate past-time, football. The 
plunk of the pigskin and the coordi- 
nating team which is the outgrowth of 
fellowship and friendship has its stim- 
ulating effect upon alumnus and spec- 
tator as well. 

Each year thousands of former stu- 
dents trek back to the campus to see 
old friends and make new ones. At 
the same time he glories in seeing 
youth perform with a love for the 
game which places a premium on 
physical power and skill. 

After the fray, with the rah of the 
crowd singing in his ear and he him- 
self hoarse from his vocal demonstra- 
tion, he mingles among his pals and 
gals, living again for a day the best 
days of his life. 

It is the collegiate call to those fel- 
lows of the educational crusade to 
join again on the one unforgetable 
spot. The Campus. "On the Hill." 
Homecoming — Saturday, October 29, 
1938. 



Rev. Lawrence 
Plumley In Texas 

In a previous issue, the item about 
Lawrence Plumley, '33, was not clearly 
stated, so his brother, Walter, sets the 
News straight. 

Rev. Lawrence Plumley has trans- 
ferred from the Trinity Church in 
Freeport, Texas, where he was Rector, 
to become Assistant Director at the 
Trinity Church in Houston, Texas. 
Lawrence is a graduate of the Uni- 
versity of the South at Swanee and 
while there met his bride whom he 
married last year. His brother, Wal- 
ter, performing the ceremony. The 
newlyweds visited Washington this 
summer and the home of the Plumleys 
in Takoma Park. During July, Lawr- 
ence took the services in Christ Church 
in Washington. While on this visit, he 
did not miss an opportunity to see the 
campus. 

Alumni Funds 

Many other institutions have found 
the Alumni Fund slogan of tremendous 
appeal to many alumni and interested 
citizens who wish to make direct con- 
tributions toward education projects. 

Shortly a great medical research 
and instructional building will be 
erected by the University in Baltimore 
which was made possible by a direct 
bequest. This gift to the University 
was not made because the donor want- 
ed his name remembered, but because 
he wanted to do something toward 
giving the future generation a more 
efficient education. 

The great field of human relations 
is an unexplored field waiting for the 
pioneers of education to explore. There 
is no better place to organize their 
minds and character than on a college 
campus. Thus the formation of a 
Alumni-Student Association. 

Several years ago the University of 
Maryland Alumni Fund was founded 
as a perpetual organization to secure 
voluntary contributions from loyal 
alumni, such contributions as they 
wished to make to be used for the 
University's physical improvement as 
the Board of Regents deemed neces- 
sary. While this fund has not received, 
during the so-called depression years, 
a great deal of publicity or urge there 
have been many alumni who have made 
contributions. Today there is a fair 
nucleus upon which to build a fund of 
worth-while service to the University. 
Contributions to this fund will be used 
by the University for those monetary 



Old Liners In 
Colonial Village 

In Colonial Village, Arlington, Vir- 
ginia, a suburb of Washington, several 
Old Liner newlyweds are making their 
homes. As you call the roll we find 
Alton Rabbitt and Estelle Remley, 
then Betty Howard and Irwin Owens. 
Probably the first among the invaders 
were Mary Keller and Buddy Goodhart. 
The only ones to boast of an addition 
is Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Galliher who 
have a girl, Barbara Joan, born in 
January. Mrs. Galliher was formerly 
Christine Cook. 

One night a week, we hear, there are 
two card games, bridge in one place 
for the ladies and poker in another 
home for the masculine gender. Be- 
fore the evening is over the usual cam- 
pus topics get a going over. Well 
that's the way to keep the Terp spirit 
alive, says Buddy Goodhart. 

• 

Development On 
Fraternity Row 

Prominent among the Greek Society 
developments is the new home of Alpha 
Xi Delta. A beautiful colonial struc- 
ture containing accommodations for 
30 girls. The general plan is a large 
living-room and dining-room on the 
first floor with study rooms on the 
second and dormitory space on the 
third. The house is located diagonally 
across the street from Theta Chi and 
faces north. 

Over on College Avenue the home 
of A. T. O. has received a revamping 
in the form of a brick covering. 
Colonial pillars have been added to the 
front and a large sunparlor on the east 
side. The floor plan remains somewhat 
the same but the large living-room is 
being renovated and enlarged. 

Going further down in the Park, Phi 
Sigma Kappa has received a complete 
inside overhauling. When school opens 
the boys will feel as if they are enter- 
ing a new home. 

When Homecoming comes around 
there will be much to see about ihe 
Park for returning graduates. 

things which are of lasting value and 
of potential use by succeeding gen- 
erations, and to better coordinate the 
march of Maryland can best be organ- 
ized by having on the University cam- 
pus an Alumni-Student union building 
for the coordinating of Human Rela- 
tions. 



10 



Maryland Alumni News 



y 




— o 


i > 


Grapevine News About Those We Know 


1 1 


6— 




A 



Sherwood Forrest — An organiza- 
ion for social and athletic entertain- 
ment among the young people of the 
summer colony elected an Old Line 
Coed to office. Betty Hottel, a junior 
in the University and member of 
Kappa Kappa Gamma, was elected 
secretary of the organization. 

O 

Sailing— Dot Allen, '36, a Tri Delt, 
put to sea on July 23 for a trip to Ber- 
muda. 

O 

Engaged or Married — By the time 
this is read the engagement and marri- 
age of Miss Margaret Elizabeth Wade, 
'31, will be history. She is to many 
Mr. Calvin L. Compton about the 
middle of September. Margaret is a 
member of the Kappa Delta Sorority 
and now with the Nanjemoy High 
School Faculty. Margaret Parey, '36, 
was bridesmaid. 



Married — On August 9, at the Pres- 
byterian Church in Hyattsville, Miss 
Jean Hamilton, '35, and Mr. Ralph 
Gray, '37, were married. Mr. Gray is 
employed by the American Automo- 
bile Association. 



Oil Business — Two members of the 
class of '37, are with the Shell Oil 
Company in Washington. W. K. Scott 
of Landover and E. C. Woodward of 
College Heights. Scott soon will be 
transferred to the Baltimore Sales 
Division. 



Wedding — Miss Ruth Nelson, '33, 
and Mr. Aldrich Medbery, '32, were 
married October 29 at the Church of 
the Epiphany. Mrs. Medbery, a mem- 
ber of Tri-Delt, is a grad in Home 
Economics. Mr. Medbery, an Engi- 
neering grad, now is an inspector for 
road materials in Washington, D. C. 
O 

Birth — Mr. and Mrs. Robert Camp 
are the proud parents of a daughter, 
so says the grapevine news. Mrs. 
Camp was formerly Miss Margaret 
Jones, '35, a member of Kappa Delta. 
Robert is of the class of '37, and a 
Delta Sig. 

O 

Married — College Park was the 



scene of the wedding of Lula L. Davis 
'37, and Willis H. Baldwin, '35, on Aug. 
3. Mrs Baldwin is a member of Alpha 
Lambda Delta, Mortar Board and Phi 
Kappa Phi. She also received the Mor- 
tar Board honor cup for attaining the 
highest scholastic average in her coll- 
ege career. Mr. Baldwin is a chemi- 
cal specialist, a member of Alpha Chi 
Sigma and now employed in the U. S. 
D. A. 

O 

Water Works — Down in the Pal- 
metto State, Robert Conk, '30, is a 
chemist for the West Palm Beach Wat- 
er Works. Bob is a member of Phi 
Sigma Kappa. 

O 

Abroad — Word was recently received 
from Mrs. Mary Taylor Fuller, now on 
her honeymoon in Venice. In fact she 
and Mr. Fuller are touring Europe. 
The trip, says Mary, a member of Al- 
pha Xi Delta, is extremely interesting. 
O 

Centreville— Wirt D. Bartlett, '25, 
returned to his hometown, Centreville, 
Md., as a consulting engineer and 
partner in a hardware business. Wirt 
is a former football center and gradu- 
ate in engineering. 
O 

Married — Miss Ruth Burslem, '34, 
and Mr. Edwin Gue, '31, were married 
May 6th in the Hyattsville Presby- 
terian Church. Mrs. Gue is a member 
of Tri-Delta and Mr. Gue of Alpha Tau 
Omega. He now is with the Duquesne 
Light and Power Company, Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania. 
O 

Birth — From Hagerstown comes the 
news that Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Semler 
have added another boy to their fam- 
ily. Eddie, '24, is a former star Old 
Liner performer on the gridiron and 
diamond. Now he is owner of a sport- 
ing goods store in Hagerstown and 
coaching at the high school. 
O 

Announcement — Members of the 
class of '34 and '37 will marry in Nov- 
ember. Ruth Kreiter, '37, a member of 
Kappa Kappa Gamma and Charles 
Berry, '34, of Delta Sigma Phi, plan 
to take the step. Ruth is with the Car- 
negie Library in Washington, Charlie 



was in New York but was recently 
transfered to Washington. 

O 

Married — Miss Catherine Barnsley, 
'30, and William Troxell, '25, were 
married June 18 last. Mrs. Troxell, a 
member of Kappa Kappa Gamma is 
also a member of the Women's Senior 
Honor Society. 

Bill Troxell is a member of Phi 
Sigma Kappa and is in the State High- 
way Department of Pennsylvania. 

O 
Birth — Dr. and Mrs. Edwin King 
Morgan announce the arrival of Nancy 
Fleming, born August 27, weighing six 
and one half pounds. Mrs. Morgan was 
formerly Miss Janet Potter of New 
York. "Eddie" as he is familiarly 
known by his classmates and brothers 
of Sigma Nu, is a practicing physician 
in Brooklyn, N. Y. The home of the 
Morgans is "The Towers", Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 



Married — The secretary of the class 
of '34, Mary T. Solomon, married a 
graduate of the Medical School, Dr. 
Frank A. Zack, '36, on August 20. Mary 
is a member of the Tri Delt Sorority 
and an enthusiastic worker in coed 
sports. 

The newlyweds will locate in New- 
port News, Virginia, where Dr. Zack 
is a member of the staff at the River- 
side Hospital. 

O 

To Wed — Next month a leading stu- 
dent in the class of '34, in the College 
of Arts and Sciences will wed. Evelyn 
Rose Brumbaugh, a member of A. 0. 
Pi and the women's senior honor so- 
ciety Mortar Board. Evelyn will marry 
Mr. Frederick H. Green of Washington. 
O 

Married — Word has been received 
that Arthur Bowers, '31, a Theta Chi 
and now with the Campbell Soup Com- 
pany is married. Anyone knowing the 
particulars, please write. If you see 
this, Arthur, let us hear from you! 
O 

Military — An honorary member of 
the "M" Club and a former boxing 
coach of the Terrapin now is instruc- 
tor in small arms at Fort Benning, 
Ga. Captain John W. Harmony, bet- 
ter known as "Jack." Recently a letter 
was received on the campus from Jack 
in which he claimed complete mastery 
of his household, everybody else was 



September, 1938 



11 



away. He sent best regards to all his 
friends at Maryland. 



Stoves — Out in St. Louis, Missouri, 
Douglas D. Burnside, '25, is Superin- 
tendent of factory for the American 
Stove Company. Doug was formerly 
in Cleveland as assistant manager. On 
his vacation this summer he brought 
his family, three children, east to see 
the campus where they will be future 
students. He has two girls and one 
boy. 

O 

Married — Miss Ernestine Hammack, 
'34, married Mr. William Worley on 
September 6, last. Ernestine is a mem- 
ber of the A. O. Pi Sorority. Her sister, 
Mrs. Jane O'Neil, '31, A. 0. Pi, was 
maid of honor and Mr. Harvey T. Cas- 
bartan, comptroller of the University, 
was best man. The newlyweds will 
reside in Washington. 
O 

Dietician — At the Sibley Hospital in 
Washington, Mary Ruth Cross, '36, is 
the dietician. After graduating in 
Home Economics Mary took a post 
graduate course receiving her M. S. 
last year. She is a member of Tri Delt. 
O 

Married — A member of the Alumni 
Board, Charles Vinton Koons, '29, 
takes the step with Miss Doris Casey 
on September 3 in Washington, D. C. 
"Dinty" is also a graduate in Law 
from Georgetown where he now is a 
member of the faculty. In addition he 
has offices as a practicing attorney. 
"Dinty" is a member of Sigma Nu 
fraternity. 

O 

Aviation — Lyman McAboy, '36, no'.v 
with the Naval Aviation Corp as a 
training cadet, expects to be stationed 
in Norfolk soon. "Thank goodness" 
says "Me," then I can get back to the 
old Campus 'On the Hill.' 

O 
Married — It may be old news to some 
but here's a reminder. "Duke" W. T. 
Lohr and Janet Cartee were married 
last year. I didn't know that, did you ? 
Well, I'll declare. 

O 
Printing — An engineer enters the 

printing business. Robert T. Settle, 
'30, now is a member of the Lucas 
Printing Company in Baltimore. Rob- 
ert is a member of Sigma Nu and 
marries a sister of another Sigma Nu, 
Mary Ann Buckheister. 
O 
Married — Miss Katherine M. Matzen, 
'34, of Berwyn, Md., married Dr. Thom- 



Old Timers 
Visit Campus 

During the summer two of Mary- 
land's distingiushed alumni among the 
old timers visited the campus. Mr. T. 
Elgie Riggs, '82, of Montgomery Coun- 
ty, and Mrs. W. C. Hammond, '81, of 
Howard County. It was the first time 
the two had visited the campus to- 
gether since they were students. An- 
other classmate of Mr. Riggs, Mr. 
John T. Braddock, visited with him 
about three years ago. 

Mr. Riggs and Mr. Hammond mar- 
veled at the great progress made by 
the University today as they remem- 
ber only one building back in 1882, 
which was destroyed by fire in 1912. 

For some little time the two remi- 
nisced over the alumni list of those 
who were students with them. Both 
were very much interested in the pro- 
gress and welfare of the Alumni Asso- 
ciation. 

as E. Christensen, Doctor in charge at 
Greenbelt. Mrs. Christensen is a grad- 
uate of the Nursing School and was 
formerly supervisor in the Pediatrics 
Department of the University Hos- 
pital. 

O 

Engaged — Who!! It may be news 
to some one but I knew it for a long 
time said the little frat pin. Mary 
Beggs and Bink Doeller will take the 
step some time in the near future. Oh 
no, let's make it a long engagement. 
So much fun. 

O 

Nursing — Alice Walker, '38, gradu- 
ate nurse with honors returned to the 
University Hospital on General Staff 
and recently transfered to the Univer- 
sity Infirmary at College Park. A class 
mate, Gladys Ware, is at the Univer- 
sity Hospital on general staff duty. 
O 

Faculty — A faculty member takes 
the matrimonial step, Miss Evelyn 
Iverson, professor of speech, is now 
Mrs. Clinton DeWitt Vernon. They 
were married September 3, and will re- 
side in Bethesda, Maryland. 

O 
Nursing — Two '38 graduates, Misses 
Betty Harcum and Elizabeth Wolfe, 
are entering this School of Nursing 
this fall. Miss Wolfe is a member of 
Kappa Kappa Gamma. 
O 
Marries — Warren Evans, '36, a cin- 
der track star and Miss Peggy Griffin 



were married September 1 in Balti- 
more. Coleman Headley, a team mate 
of Evans, was best man. Mrs. Evans 
is a member of Kappa Kappa Gamma. 
Warren is physical ed. instructer and 
coach at Frederick High School, Fred- 
erick, Maryland. 

O 

Married — Isabel Rebecca Howes, 
'32, of Sykesville, Maryland, married 
Mr. Walter E. Engle on August 28 last. 
Mrs Howes is a graduate in Dietetics 
and has attended summer school at 
Western States Teachers College in 
Kalamazoo, Michigan. 
O 

Wedding — The popular Mary Owens, 
'33, in coed athletics, took the marriage 
step on September 2 with Mr. C. How- 
ard Eiring in Washington, D. C. Mary 
is a member if Tri Delt and took an 
active interest in campus life. 
O 

Married — Professor of Economics 
Paul Walker, '19, went to Westminster, 
Maryland, for his bride Miss Francis 
Myer in May '38. Paul is in the Coll- 
ege of Commerce as a specialist in Ag- 
riculture Economics. Mrs. Walker is 
the daughter of Dr. J. Edgar Myers, 
graduate of the Dental School. The 
newlyweds reside in College Park. 
O 

Birth — Mr. and Mrs. Roger F. Buv- 
dette announce the arrival of a daugh- 
ter, September 9. Roger is a member 
of Alpha Gamma Rho and is em- 
ployed in agricultural economics de- 
partment at the University. The Bur- 
dettes reside in College Park. 
O 

Married — Miss Rosalie Grant, '34, 
and Mr. Green Rayner Gaillard became 
Mr. and Mrs. on September 10, at the 
Pinkney Memorial Church in Hyatts- 
ville. Rosalie is a member of Kappa 
Kappa Gamma and former women's 
editor of the Diamondback. Alumni in 
the wedding party were Margaret Her- 
ring, '32, Anna Gibbs, '35, Barbara 
Gibbs, '36 and Arthur P. Gambrill, Jr., 
'34. 

O 

Coach — Coaching athletics and teach 
math is the occupation of James F. 
Zimmerman, '37, at Thurmont High 
School, Maryland. 

O 

Real Estate — Samuel A. Bogley, '36, 
is a real estate broker for Washington 
and suburbs. 

O 

Chemist — Plant Chemist, Wayne 
Dale Irwin, '34, is with the Celanese 
Corp. of America at Cumberland, Md. 



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Copyright 1938, Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. 






Maryland Alumni News 



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HOMECOMING » 



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More Goods for More People at Less Cost 



HA D the l]/2 million people who bought 
new radio sets in 1937 been obliged to 
pay 1929 prices for them, the total cost to the 
public would have been $700,000,000 greater 
than it actually was. In fact, the 7 J 2 million 
sets of 1937 cost the public $188, 000, 000 less than 
the 43-2 million sets of 1929. And because 
radios cost less, more people could buy them, 
and the purchasers had more money to buy 
additional comforts and conveniences. 

This is but one of many cases where industry 
has found ways to make better products at less 
cost. For instance, the l 1 •> million electric 
washers bought in 1937 cost the purchasers 2 
million dollars less than the million bought in 
1929. The 1,200,000 electric fans bought in 1937 



cost the purchasers $700,000 less than about 
half that number bought in 1929. And in this 
same period hundreds of other manufactured 
products, because of improved manufacturing 
methods, have been reduced in cost so that more 
people can have more of the good things of life. 

This process of creating real wealth has brought 
to America the highest standard of living ever 
known, and it is this process which must con- 
tinue if even higher standards are to be attained. 
General Electric scientists, engineers, and work- 
men are contributing to this progress. By 
developing new and better ways to use elec- 
tricity for the benefit of the public, they are 
constantly providing More Goods for More 
People at Less Cost. 



G-E research and engineering have saved the public jrom ten to one hundred dollars 
for every dollar they have earned for General Electric 



GENERAL flfe ELECTRIC 



1938 -OUR SIXTIETH YEAR OF MAKING ELECTRICITY MORE USEFUL TO YOU -1938 



Volume X 



MARYLAND ALUMNI NEWS, OCTOBER, 1938 



Number 5 



Alumni Association-University of Maryland Cover Pictu 



re 



Founded in 1892 

♦ 

Officers for 1938-39 

C. WALTER COLE, '21, President 

Towson, Md. 



Charles W. Sylvester, '08, Vice-President 
Baltimore, Md. 



G. F. Pollock, '23, Sec-Treasurer 
College Park, Md. 



Alumni Board 

(Note — The officers named above are also members of the Alumni Board) 
Reuben Brig-ham, '08, P. W. Chichester, '20, Education 

Arts and Sciences John A. Silkman, '35, Agriculture 

Charles V. Koons, '29, Engineering Ruth Miles, '31, Home Economics 

Members at Large 

Esther Hughes Lee, '33, Women's Rep. J. Donald Kieffer, '30, Men's Rep. 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Editor 

Maryland Alumni News, issued monthly by the University of Maryland 
Alumni Association at College Park, Md., as second-class matter under the Act 
of Congress of March 3, 1879. 

Annual Alumni Association dues are $2.00. One year's subscription to 
Alumni News, 50 cents. 

Group Leaders 

Allegany County: E. Brooke Whiting, '98, President; Dr. Joseph Franklin, '21, Secretary, Cum- 
berland, Md. 

Baltimore County: C. Walter Cole, '21, President; H. B. Derrick, '17, Secretary, Towson, Md. 

Baltimore City: Chester Tawney, '31, President, 4022 Roland Avenue; E. Gordon Hammond, '34, 
Secretary, 1023 W. Barre Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Caroline County: George W. Clendaniel, '20, President, Denton; Dr. Maurice A. Brackett, '21, 
Treasurer, Denton ; Mrs. George W. Clendaniel, '21, Secretary, Denton. 

Harford County: W. B. Munnikhuysen, '14, President; H. M. Carroll, '20, Secretary, Bel Air, Md. 

Frederick County: J. Homer Remsberg, '18, President; Henry R. Shoemaker, '17, Secretary, 
Frederick, Md. 

Montgomery County: Lawrence G. Smoot, '18, President, Kensington, Md. ; Mary Fisher, '36, 
Secretary, Rockville, Md. 

New York City: Donald Kieffer, '30, President. 195 Broadway; Sarah Morris, '25, Secretary, 
140 E. 63rd Street, New York City. 

Philadelphia: A. Moulton McNutt, '06, President, 413 Cooper Street, Camden, N. J.; J. P. Mudd, 
'07, Secretary, 173 Manheim Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pittsburg: E. Minor Wenner, '27, President, 1111 Gladys Avenue; Dr. A. A. Krieger, '32, Sec- 
retary, Highland Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Washington, D. C: J. Douglas Wallop, '19, President, 6139 N. Dakota Avenue, N. W. ; Charles V. 
Koons, '29, Secretary, 419 Fourth Street, N. E., Washington. 

Washington County: Hon. Henry Holzapfel, Jr., '93, President, Hagerstown, Md. ; L. G. Mathias, 
'23, Secretary, Hagerstown, Md. 

"M" Club Officers and Board Members 



President — Dr. A. A. Parker, '04. 
Vice-President— Donald H. Adams, '28. 



Secretary-Treas. — Dr. E. N. Cory, '09. 
Historian— Bob Hill, '26. 



Representatives 



Baseball- -G. F. Pollock. '23. 
Basket-ball— H. B. Shipley, '14. 
Boxing — Victor Wingate, "35. 
Lacrosse — James Stevens, '19. 
Track— Lewis W. Thomas, '28. 



Tennis — James Shumate, '17. 
Cross Co. — Charles Remsberg, '26. 
Football— Kirk Besley, '23. 
At Large — Dr. E. B. Friedenwald, '03. 
Dr. A. W. Valentine, '04. 



Is the Library as it is seen from the 
walk which leads to the Boys' Dormi- 
tory. Also all those who approach the 
campus "On the Hill" see these stately 
pillars facing the open campus to the 
East. Those old grads of more than 30 
years ago remember this part of the 
campus as their parade ground and 
athletic field. 

• 

The Presidents Message 

AUR ANNUAL HOMECOMING, as 
you have been advised by personal 
letter, takes place Friday and Satur- 
day, October 28th and 29th, beginning 
Friday at 3 P. M. and continuing 
through Saturday afternoon. You 
should have received a copy of the 
itemized program which indicates the 
many interesting features of entertain- 
ment provided for our pleasure. 

This event is the forerunner of the 
four important dates celebrated by our 
association annually. The others to 
follow are Charter Day, held each year 
on January 20th, at the Lord Balti- 
more Hotel, Baltimore City, Maryland 
Day on March 25th at College Park 
and Alumni Day, held during the 
month of May at College Park, the 
exact date to be yet determined. All 
of these are especially designed and 
arranged for the attraction of the 
alumni. We believe your manifesta- 
tion of interest in them will largely 
determine the success of the objectives 
of our association this year. We confi- 
dently believe that your attendance at 
these functions and your enthusiastic 
support of them will do much to fur- 
ther the progress of our association. 

October 28th and 29th are sufficiently 
far hence for a large majority of our 
members to arrange to be present with 
their family and friends. We urge you 
to do so and look forward to your pre- 
sence on the campus that day and the 
other Alumni days to follow as men- 
tioned. 

Sincerely yours, 

C. Walter Cole, '21, 
President. 



Maryland Alumni News 



Fifteenth Annual Homecoming 



» 



» 



/\NE OF THE HIGH POINTS in 
^the fall program of the 1938-39 
season will be the 15th annual Alumni 
Homecoming- on Saturday, October 29, 
at College Park. 

Each Fall as the pigskin conversa- 
tion holds the spotlight in all College 
gatherings those Alumni of the higher 
educational institutions begin to think 
of the many friends and the opportu- 
nity to join with them in seeing the 
Alma Mater perform on the gridiron. 
Naturally they look forward to seeing 
their team win but above all they want 
to see a real football game. And then, 
in back of it all, what inspires them 
to attend these functions but the op- 
portunity to see their old friends again. 
Besley, '23, General Chairman 

The responsibilities of those who 
undertake to organize the annual home- 
coming in any University are very 
great. They are acting not only for 
the present reunion but for subsequent 
gatherings of fellow alumni. There- 
fore, in picking a general chairman 
for this occasion they chose one who 
has a great deal of interest and enthu- 
siasm for perpetuating the Old Line 
spirit. He is no other than A. Kirk- 
land Besley, graduate in class of '23, 
a former gridiron and diamond star. 
"Kirk," as he is more familiarly known, 
has a Doctor's degree in Bacteriology 
and is employed at the Beltsville Ag- 
ricultural center of the U. S. D. A. 
Program Begins Friday 

The program for homecoming actu- 
ally involves two days, beginning on 
Friday afternoon at 3 P. M. with a 
football game between the Varsity B 
squads of the University of Pennsyl- 
vania and Maryland. At 7 P. M. the 
annual homecoming bonfire and pep 
rally will be staged on the campus. 
Those who were present last year will 
remember the seemingly endless snake 
dance that reached practically from 
Margaret Brent Hall almost to the 
campus entrance. The parade was ac- 
companied by the University Band and 
ended on the parade field near the cam- 
pus gate. Following the pep rally the 
annual homecoming dance will be held 
in the University Gymnasium with a 
well-known orchestra providing the 
music. Many new innovations will be 
a part of the dance this year. Prizes 
for several contests will be awarded. 
The first prize will be for the tacky 
dance where one will be given to the 
funniest dressed couple and another to 
the most original dressed couple. There 



will be another prize dance for the best 
couple in a jitterbug dance contest. 
There will be Fraternity competitions 
in a big apple team dance, which will 
have f i*o m eight to ten couples in each. 
Another prize dance will be a balloon 
dance and the girl who keeps the bal- 
loon on her ankle the longest will win 
the first award. As usual the home- 
coming dance will be held in the Ritchie 
Coliseum and the price will be but $1.50 
per couple or stag for nearly four 
hours of dancing. The chairman of 
the dance committee is H. Burton 
Shipley, '14, the varsity basket-ball 
and baseball coach and himself a form- 
er football, basket-ball and baseball 
star. 

Maryland vs. V. M. I. 

The following day, Saturday, Octo- 
ber 29, the Alumni Homecoming regis- 
tration will begin. At 9 o'clock in the 
morning registration will be held in the 
Ritchie Coliseum; during the forenoon 
the returning old grads will be enter- 
tained by the Freshmen football teams 
from V. M. I. and Maryland. Here is 
a splendid opportunity to see just what 
potential opportunities are in store 
for the Old Liners next year. At 12 
noon the traditional tug-o-war between 
the two famous classes of Sophomores 
and Freshmen, will be staged on the 
banks of the historic Paint Branch. 
Following the tug-o-war those Alumni 
who wish to visit and remain in the 
vicinity of the stadium, will have an 
opportunity to participate in a buffet 
luncheon served by an Alumni Com- 
mittee at a nominal cost. Following 
the buffet luncheon at 1 o'clock there 
will be a tour of inspection and judging 
of the Fraternity and Sorority House 
decorations for which first and second 
prizes will be presented at half time of 
the football game. By 1 : 30 the strains 
cf the Old Line band will be heard com- 
ing across the campus leading the 

Barn Dance 

Friday, November 11, the second an- 
nual costume Barn Dance sponsored by 
the Student Agriculture Council will be 
held in the University Gymnasium. The 
Agriculture Council is composed of 
members of the Grange, the student 
chapter of the F. F. A., Alpha Zeta, 
Agriculture Economics Club, Live 
Stock Club, and the Bacteriology So- 
ciety, with Mr. Elmer Heubeck as pres- 
ident. The dance is under the auspices 
of the College of Agriculture for Ag- 
riculture faculty, students and alumni. 



annual parade of Freshmen before the 
reviewing eyes of Alumni. At 2 : 30 the 
Cadets from V. M. I. and Terps of 
Maryland will begin their annual 
classic on the gridiron. Needless to 
recall to the attention of enthusiastic 
followers of football that V. M. I. and 
Maryland played one of the most thrill- 
ing games of the year last fall when 
Maryland won the game in the last two 
minutes of play by the accurate toe of 
Pershing Mondorff. former soccer star 
of Frederick County, when he kicked a 
field goal. Repeating somewhat the 
performance at the homecoming game 
at College Park last year, another 
colorful float parade will be presented 
by the various student organizations. 
This parade attracted a great deal of 
attention and was well praised last 
year. 

"M" Club Meeting 

Following the game the annual meet- 
ing of the "M" Club will be held in the 
University Gymnasium, where the 
election of officers for the ensuing year 
will take place and many interesting 
subjects in connection with athletics 
will be discussed. At 5:15 in the same 
building but in the main room the 
annual Alumni Mixer Supper and 
Dance will get under way. Here many 
Alumni, faculty members, their sweet- 
hearts, wives and friends will renew 
old acquaintances and many new ones 
will be made. Each year this function 
has had a splendid turn-out and there 
is every indication that it will be even 
larger this year than it was last. 

In addition to the Alumni Mixer on 
the hill, each fraternity and sorority 
in the University will have open house 
and each will have some sort of a func- 
tion for their Alumni that evening, 
including a tea, buffet supper, dinner, 
banquet and dance. Last year each 
fraternity and sorority registered a 
large number of their Alumni. No one 
who attended the reunion last year will 
easily forget the great gestures of wel- 
come and hospitality accorded them by 
the student body of the Campus on 
the Hill. 

Don't forget the date, which is Sat- 
urday, October 29, at College Park. 
• 

Nurses To Be Guests 

A new part of the Homecoming pro- 
gram is the gesture of Alpha Xi Delta 
Sorority. They will be host to the 
Nursing School students at the fif- 
teenth annual homecoming on October 
29. The sorority house will be deco- 
rative and will have a buffet supper 
and entertainment in the evening for 
alumni and guests. 



October, 1938 



Alumni Play Important 
Part In Politics 

Maryland Alumni hold the spotlight 

in the fall elections — a well known 
sport. 

Gubernatorial opponents are, His 
Excellency Harry W. Nice, '95, cani- 
date for reelection on the Republican 
ticket. His opposition is the Hon. Her- 
bert R. O'Conor, '12, Attorney General 
of. Maryland, candidate for Governor 
on the Democratic ticket. Both men 
have eminent records in their services 
to the people of Maryland and they 
will conscientiously do their utmost to 
direct good government for the "Old 
Line" state. For many years they have 
been prominent men in the legal pro- 
fession. But while they may have dif- 
ferences of opinion in government, 
they are always loyal to their Alma 
Mater, the University of Maryland. 

In the national limelight we find the 
Hon. Millard E. Tydings, '10, candi- 
date for reelection to the United States 
Senate. Senator Tydings was the vic- 
tor in a hard fought primary contest, 
but characteristic of his school day 
determination, he exemplified the "Old 
Line" spirit, "fight until the last whis- 
tle and you will win." 

For reelections to Congress we have 
the Hon. Stephen W. Gambrill, '92, of 
the fifth district. In the second dis- 
trict the Hon. W. P. Cole, Jr., '10, is 
also a primary winner and candidate 
for reelection to the House of Repre- 
sentatives of the U. S. Congress. Both 
are running on the Democratic ticket. 

Many other Alumni throughout the 
state are candidates for state and coun- 
ty offices. Each year more Alumni of 
the University are entering this field 
of public service to the people of Mary- 
land. It is a tradition of the Univer- 
sity to send its sons and daughters as 
leaders in the communities of the state. 



Suggestions 



An Alumnus recently sent the editor 
a suggestion about personal items. 
"Why not include, when possible, the 
addresses of an alumnus when pub- 
lishing news items. Frequently alumni 
would like to drop a line to a fellow 
alumnus whom they read about." 
{Editor — In the future this will be 
done to the best of our ability. Thank 
you, Gertrude] ! 

Allen Carroll Stephens, '33, is in 
business for himself. He is a consult- 
ing engineer and lives in Washington, 
D. C. 



Dr. Lynn, '07, Prominent 
Surgeon, Succumbs 

Maryland has lost one of its most 
eminent Medical Alumni in the death 
of Dr. Frank S. Lynn, '07. Dr. Lynn 
was a man of outstanding character 
and a lovable personality. He was 
generous, considerate and kindly in his 
contacts with people. His fellow men 
regarded and respected him as one of 
the most outstanding men in the medi- 
cal profession. 

Ever since his graduation he has 
been connected with his Alma Mater 
and has given untiringly of his loyalty 
and concerted efforts in helping the 
University attain its high rank in the 
educational world. He was well known 
by Alumni in all branches of the pro- 
fessional school. 

His poise and character exerted a 
tremendous influence among the per- 
sonel of the University Hospital. On 
behalf of the Alumni of the College 
Park School of the University The 
News takes this opportunity to express 
sincere condolence to his bereaved 
family. 

Montgomery County 
Group Organized 

On Monday, October 3, the perma- 
nent organization of the University 
of Maryland Alumni Group of Montgo- 
mery County was perfected. Lawrence 
R. Smoots, '18, of Kensington was 
elected president. Miss Mary Fisher, 
'36, of Rockville, secretary, and Morri- 
son M. Clark, '20, Silver Springs, 
treasurer. 

Following the regular business meet- 
ing a special program was presented 
which included group singing and an 
address by Dr. W. W. Skinner, '95, on 
the facts leading up to the signing of 
the Charter of the University. Other 
Alumni who spoke at the meeting were 
A. K. Besley, '23, Chairman of the 
Homecoming Committee, also Edie 
Johnson, President of the Student Gov- 
ernment, on the active interest on the 
part of the students in plans for Home- 
coming. 

More than fifty Alumni were pre- 
sent for the meeting. It is planned to 
have four meetings a year, each being 
held in a different part of the county. 
O 

Class Of 1923 — For the benefit of 
other Alumni here is a bit of informa- 
tion about Gladys Crothers, '23. She 
is Mrs. Joe Virden of Baltimore City. 
Dr. Virden is a grad of Johns Hopkins 
University. They live at 1120 St. Paul 
St., Baltimore, Maryland. 



Sgt. McManus 
Transferred; Given 
Regimental Review 

"Mr. Mac," who steered fledgling Re- 
serve Officer Training Corps students 
for 19 years through the intricacies of 
drills and parades at the University 
of Maryland, was given a surprise 
regimental review. 

Warrant Officer William H. Mc- 
Manus is the name "Mr. Mac" has 
signed to countless numbers of Army 
forms which followed thousands of 
his students from buck privates until 
they were graduated four years later 
as second lieutenants. 

But the form-signing and drilling 
is over at the university for "Mr. 
Mac." He was transferred to the 3rd 
Corps Area headquarters in Baltimore 
to start his 40th year in the Army. 

While university officials and stu- 
dents looked on, "Mr. Mac" was pre- 
sented with a gold watch and chain 
by Cadet Col. Ralph Bishop as a 
farewell gift from the regiment. 
9 

Married — On October 1, Andrew 
Laurie, class of 1934, was married to 
Miss Helen M. Allen, the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Alarik Allen of East 
Orange, New Jersey. The ceremony 
was performed at The First Reformed 
Church of East Orange. 

Andy, a member of Phi Delta Theta, 
graduated from the Law School of 
Newai-k University last June and is 
now associated with the firm of Smith 
and Slingerland in Newark. 
O 

Principal — Former assistant princi- 
pal Thomas S. Gwynn, Jr., '34, has been 
appointed principal at Upper Marl- 
boro High School to succeed Mr. Wil- 
liam T. Jobe, resigned. Thomas re- 
ceived his Master of Science degree 
in school administration last year. 
O 

Accounting — Merchandise accounting 
is the occupation of J. Herbert Brill, 
'36. He is with the Western Electric 
Company in Baltimore. In college he 
was president of the Senior Class, 
treasurer of the Junior Class, captain 
of the R. O. T. C. and played lacrosse 
for four years. He was a Phi Delta 
Theta and O. D. K. 
O 

Married — On September 9, Constance 
Nash, '37, and Eddie Gibbs, '37, a mem- 
ber of Phi Delta Theta, took the matri- 
monial step. Constance attended the 
University one year and was a pledge 
of A. O. Pi. 



Maryland Alumni News 



On Display for Homecoming 



» » 




Alpha Xi Delta's New Home 

• 9 

Dr. W. A. Evans. '92, Attention Alumni 

Pharmacist, Dies junior worker wanted 

Maryland State Welfare Board 

A prominent member of the Phar- ,_ , ..„ . .. 

(Open only to qualified residents (if 

macy Alumni, Dr. William Ashton Maryland Counties) 

Evans, '92, died recently at his home in Compensation : Approximately $1,020 

Arlington, Virginia. Dr. Evans a de- per annum 

cendant of the historical Daniel Boone DuTIES: Under supervision, to investi- 

was a pharmacist of considerable pro- gate applicants for assis tance, and 

minence in Washington. He was born to perform related work as require d. 

and raised in Maryland. Among the _, _ , 

,. „ ,. .„ - , ., Examples: Interviewing applicants for 

archives of history you will find the . . ... 

j. , . , , j. .., assistance and making mvestiga- 

names of his grandparents who faith- .. . , , 

j. „ , ., . . . ,, tions; preparing case records; plan- 

iullv served their country in the war . ' , & ,. . 

j, 1R1 „ nmg budgets; sending out assistance 

after approval; following up emplov- 

Shortly after Dr. Evans' graduation ment possibilities and other commu . 

he began as a junior pharmacist in njty resources . closiRg cases; per . 

Washington. His tenacious efforts forming aux iliarv service in familv 

won for him a place of prominence in or individual situa tions; keeping re- 

his profession as well as that of an out- CQrds and preparing reports . 

standing citizen of Washington. He _ „ , . 

, , tt t j e Qualifications: Completion of two 

was a member of Harmony Lodge of ^ , r 

„r u ■ . , ,, years college or normal school work 

Washington and numerous other or- , & 

ganizations. Interment was made in plus °" e successful years experience 

the Glenwood Cemetery of Washington. m em P lo y m ent on salary as a worker 

in a recognized social agency; or, 

• graduation from a college or univer- 

Attorney— Patent Attorney is the sit y of recognized standing, prefer- 

profession of Albin F. Knight, '28, with abl y with specialization in one of 

the American Enka Company of North the social sciences; familiarity with 

Carolina, whose headquarters are at social work concepts; good address. 

Ashville. Albin hails from Rockville, Note: Open to applicants between ages 

Maryland, and is a member of Sigma of 21 and 40. 

Phi Sigma. Parts And Weights In Test: 

O Education 3 

Experience 1 

Married — Miss Beatrice Phillips and Duties (written test) 2 

Interview 4 

Frank Patrick Duggan, '36, are to be Date 0f Test . Tq bfi anrounced 

married. "Pat", former business man- Write . gTATE Employment Commis . 

ager of the Old Line, is a member of SI0NER> 22 Light stvvet> Baltimorej 

Phi Delta Theta. Maryland, or communicate with the 

O Alumni Office at College Park. 

Teaching — English instructor at Q 

Federalsburg High School is James Married— Edward Bunch, M. A., '37, 

Frank Lane, Jr., '35. He resides in and Miss Betty Coppage were married 

Goldsboro, Maryland. August 13 at St. Mary's City, Md. 



The Alumni Purpose 

Looking through the columns of 
literature we find the general purpose 
of each Alumni Association in the Uni- 
ersity as follows: "We are all united 
in one common unified purpose, the 
University of Maryland, it's welfare 
and prestige. To promote the interest 
of the University, to cultivate and 
foster intimate relations and feeling 
of fellowship among the graduates and 
matriculates of all departments. To 
support and advance the cause of 
higher education and to cooperate with 
the University authorities in carrying 
out proposals for its further pro- 
gress." 

As one Alumni President said, "The 
best alumni service is a living illustra- 
tion of the cultural power of a center 
of learning. Such an alumni member 
may not sell as many goods as the 
one who took the other plan of life. 
He may not be able to make a 
handsome personal contribution to 
alumni funds, but his type of alumni 
representative will attract respect for 
the institution that produced it, and 
respect will attract the benefits of 
those with wealth who wish to invest 
it wisely and productively. In the long 
run that college will profit whose 
alumni naturally, sincerely and elo- 
quently show the results of deep cul- 
tural experience." 

It is not necessary to remind our 
alumni of the tremendous, yes, un- 
paralleled influence which your speech, 
your hearing, your look and gesture, 
and your attitude can exert in making 
the alumni association reflect credit 
upon our University. You are leaders 
of the fine life which has been built 
in your University and you can best 
serve your University by seeking every 
opportunity to encourage every alum- 
nus to give his best for his Alma 
Mater. 

© 

Birth — Mr. and Mrs. Robert Troth 
have a young daughter born last 
month. Mrs. Troth was formerly Miss 
Josephine Symons, '33, a member of 
Kappa Kappa Gamma, and the daugh- 
ter of Dr. T. B. Symons, '02. "Bob" 
was in the class of '31, and now is a 
representative of the Home Life In- 
surance Company. The Troths reside 
in College Park. 

O 

Laboratory Supplies — A former Old 
Line gridiron figure, Charles Callahan, 
'36, is clerk and salesman for E. J. 
Callahan & Company, laboratory sup- 
plies, of Baltimore. 



A Football Message 

to 
Maryland Men 

It gives The Atlantic Refining Company great pleasure to announce 
that it will broadcast most of Maryland's 1938 football games. 

These broadcasts will be dignified, accurate and entertaining. 
Commentators have been chosen both for their knowledge of foot- 
ball and for their recognized ability in radio broadcasting. Adver- 
tising commercials will be used sparingly and in good taste — never 
while a game is in progress. 

We sincerely hope that those of you who cannot go to the 
games will tune in one of the stations listed below. We feel sure 
that some exciting football afternoons are in store for you. 

THE ATLANTIC REFINING COMPANY 

PETROLEUM PRODUCTS 



GAMES TO BE 


BROADCAST 


SEPTEMBER 24 RICHMOND 


OCTOBER 22 VIRGINIA 


OCTOBER 1 PENN STATE 


NOVEMBER 12 FLORIDA 


I At State College) 


lAt Gainesville) 


OCTOBER 8 SYRACUSE 


NOVEMBER 19 ..GEORGETOWN 


lAt Syracuse! 




NOVEMBER 24. . . 


.WASH. & LEE 


1 At Baltimore) 


BALTIMORE WCAO 


HAGERSTOWN WJEJ 


SALISBURY 


WSAL 




Maryland Alumni News 



OLD LINE ATHLETICS 



» 



» 



By W. H. ("Bill") HOTTEL 



Old Grads Will View 
Plenty Of Football 

HPHERE IS PLENTY IN STORE for 
Maryland old grads who like their 
football when they hike back to College 
Park on October 28 and 29 for the 
annual homecoming festivities. 

Of course the big affair of the two 
days will be the battle between the 
V. M. I. Varsity and the Terps on 
Saturday afternoon at 2:30, but there 
will be two prelude games of more 
than ordinary interest. 

As an appetizer, on the 28th the 
Penn Junior Varsity will journey from 
Philadelphia to College Park to play 
the Maryland Junior Varsity at 2:15, 
while Saturday morning at 10, the 
V. M. I. Frosh and Terps yearlings will 
have it out. 

Penn's junior squad may be ex- 
pected to prove too classy for the 
Maryland juniors, but the battle of the 
baby Cadets and Terps should be a 
50-50 affair. 

V. M. I. and Maryland Varsities 
have staged some stirring battles, and 
while the Cadets will come to College 
Park as the favorites, that means 
little. In 1936 the Cadets upset the 
favored Terps at College Park, and 
last fall Maryland traveled to Lexing- 
ton and returned the compliment. 

But regardless of which wins it 
should be a game well worth seeing 
and a fitting climax to the annual cele- 
bration. 

• 

Keller Sure To 
Be Yank 

Charlie Keller, former Maryland ath- 
lete, who led the International League 
in batting and other phases of run- 
getting for the second successive year, 
is sure to go up with the New York 
Yankees next spring. A Yankee scout 
is reported to have said that the only 
outfielder on the Yankee team that 
Charlie could not beat out was Joe 
DiMaggio. 

• 

Junior Varsity Is Beaten 

Todie Riggs' Junior Varsity lost its 
first game of football when it jour- 
neyed to Keyser, West Va., on October 
15 and was defeated by Potomac State, 
19 to 0. However, the Terps put up an 
interesting game and gratified the fabs 
at the contest. 



Terps, Injury-Jinxed, 
Get A Dismal Start 

When it went into the battle with 
Western Maryland on October 15, 
Maryland's football team, riddled by 
injuries, had dropped its three pre- 
vious games to Richmond, Penn State 
and Syracuse. 

Some of the injuries came in the 
opening game with Richmond, lost by 
a 19 to 6 score, notably that which 
kept Charlie Weidinger, ace passer 
and quarterback, on the bench until 
the Terrors were met, but the biggest 
blows came later. 

Meade and Mondorff Lost 

Jim Meade, all-Southern Conference 
back of 1937, and a power in every de- 
partment of the game, broke his ankle 
in the Penn State contest, October 1, 
and, of course, was lost for the season. 
Then on the day before the squad was 
to leave to play Syracuse October 8, 
Pershing Mondorff, who was to have 
taken Meade's place, was operated on 
for appendicitis and also was shelved 
for the year. 

Weidinger, Rip Hewitt, chief utility 
back, and Francis Beamer, rangy end, 
did not make the Penn State trip and 
these three, along with Bob Smith, 
soph center, Frank Skotnicki and Joe 
Murphy, backfield stars, who were hurt 
in the clash with the Nittany Lions, 
were left home when Syracuse was 
tackled. 

Then in the Syracuse tilt, Bob 
Brown, big tackle; Jim Forrester, 
senior center, and Nick Budkoff, No. 1 
end, joined the hospital list, and were 
not available when Western Maryland 
was battled, while Hewitt made only 
a brief stay in that contest. 

Foes Have Powerful Teams 

Penn State, winning 33-0, and Syra- 
cuse, running up a record score of 53 to 
against the Terps, were just too 
powerful for the depleted Maryland 
team to hold in check. Both have unusu- 
ally strong teams, having a super-abun- 
dance of real gridders for every posi- 
tion, as is illustrated by the fact that 
Syracuse used 53 players, 30 more 
than the Terps had to take with them. 

However, Coach Frank Dobson and 
all connected with the team are fight- 
ing their way out of the dismal pic- 
ture and the Terps are sure to make 



Maryland Has Edge 
In Play With V. M. I. 

V. M. I. and Maryland will be play- 
ing their 17th game of a series begun 
back in 1906, in the October 29 clash 
at College Park. However, the teams 
met only intermittently until 1927, but 
they have been battling it out annually 
ever since as fellow members of the 
Southern Conference. 

Maryland holds the edge in the 
series, with nine wins to five for V. M. 
I., and two of the contests have been 
ties. 

In the last two years they have 
taken turns in spoiling each others 
homecoming, V. M. I. winning, 13 to 7, 
in 1936, and Maryland getting revenge, 
9 to 7, at Lexington last fall. Both 
games were thrillers, and it will take 
a beauty this year to match them. 

Here is the complete record of the 
Cadet-Terp rivalry: 

1906— V. M. I.. 3:! ; M. A. C, 5. 
1910— V. M. I.. 8; M. A. C, 0. 
1916— Maryland State, 15; V. M. I.. 9. 
1917— Maryland State, 14 ; V. M. I., 14. 
1918— Maryland State. 7 ; V. M. I.. 6. 
1927— U. of M., 10 ; V. M. I., 7. 
1928— U. of M., ; V. M. I., 0. 
1929— V. M. I., 7 ; U. of M.. 6. 
1930— U. of M., 20; V. M. I., 0. 
1931— U. of M.. 41 ; V. M. I., 20. 
1932 -U. of M., 12 ; V. M. I., 7. 
1933— V. M. I., 19 ; U. of M., 13. 
1934— U. of M., 23 ; V. M. I., 0. 
1935— U. of M., 6 ; V. M. I., 0. 
1936 V. M. I.. 13; U. of M.. 7. 
1937— U. of M., 9 ; V. M. I., 7. 

the going difficult for every remaining 
opponent. 

Syracuse Got Its Revenge 

Maryland did not play Richmond in 
1937, but defeated the Old Dominion 
team in 1936 in the Virginia Capital, 
12 to 0. 

Penn State was met last fall and the 
Terps succumbed after a brilliant bat- 
tle, 21 to 14. 

But it was Syracuse which was look- 
ing for the sweet revenge that it got, 
for the Orange had not scored on Mary- 
land for three years. They battled 
scoreless in 1935, then the Terps 
marched to 20 to and 13 to victories 
in 1936 and 1937, respectively, last 
year's triumph coming after the Or- 
ange had upset Cornell. 

Rival Squads are Superior 

While Maryland doubtless would 
have been beaten by both Penn State 

(Continued on Page 9) 



October, 1938 



Defeat Of Terrors 
Is Tonic For Terps 

Maryland's crippled football team 
got a tonic in a stirring- 14 to 8 victory 
over Western Maryland in the game in 
the Baltimore Stadium on October 15. 

The triumph was all the more en- 
couraging in that the Terps overcame 
a 8 to deficit with two touchdowns in 
the last 20 minutes of play. 

Charley Weidinger, back in the game 
after two weeks on the hospital list, 
sparked the drives that won. He made 
three great passes that carried to the 
two yard line in the third period, from 
where he scored, and he joined with the 
other ball toters, particularly Frank 
Skotnicki, in a running attack that 
brought the second counter. 

However, there was a downcasting 
angle to the victory, as George Gienger, 
soph guard, suffered a broken bone in 
his jaw and joined Jim Meade and 
Pershing Mondorff in being out for 
the rest of the season. 

Unless the injury jinx continues to 
work overtime, the Terps should be able 
to have all the other men back by the 
time V. M. I. is met at homecoming. 

Terps, lnjury-Jinxed, 
Get a Dismal Start 

(Continued from Page S) 

and Syracuse regardless of blows 
struck the Terps by the unusual series 
of injuries, the Nittany Lions and Or- 
ange certainly would have been held 
to low scores had Maryland been able 
to present all its assets. 

However, as conditions existed, 
Maryland, with its limited material, 
was utterly hopeless before such grid 
powerhouses. 

Every team Maryland will meet 
from now to the end of the campaign 
will have more and better material, 
but the Terps are not so outclassed as 
to be routed or even prevented from 
ringing up a victory in any of the con- 
tests. 

Off To Arabia 

Recently a going away party was 
held by the A. O. Pi girls in honor of 
Anita Peters, '29, now Mrs. William 
Burleigh. Mr. and Mrs. Burleigh are 
to sail shortly for a three year stay 
in Arabia. Anita attended "Sweet 
Briar" and Maryland and was a social 
service worker following graduation. 
The Burleighs have been living in 
California. 



Grapevine News About Those We Know 



o 

Salesman — When in Johnstown, Pa., 
look up John W. Bell, '37, now the 
sales representative for the McCor- 
mick Company of Baltimore. Johnny 
hails from Hyattsville, is a member of 
A. T. O., and was active in Old Line 
and Diamondback work. 
O 

Magazine — Up in New York City 
Wilfred E. Nevius, 1936, is a news- 
paper marker for the well-known 
FortiDie magazine. Last year Nevius 
attended Columbia University and took 
a special course in English. He hails 
from College Park and received his 
A. B. degree in the College of Arts 
and Sciences. Anyone desiring to write 
him can do so at 341 East 52nd Street, 
New York City. 

O 
.Married — Miss Dorothy Griffith, 
formerly of Takoma Park, is now Mrs. 
Livings and a resident of Hyattsville, 
Maryland. Dorothy has had consider- 
able experience in stenographic and 
statistical work following her gradu- 
ation. In college she was quite active 
in coeducational athletics with a great 
deal of emphasis on rifle team com- 
petition. 

O 
Manager — In the Baltimore branch 
of the C. F. Arminger, Inc., dealers in 
lawnmowers, we find Alvin S. Kline, 
formerly of Frederick, Maryland. He 
resides at 149 Reistertown Road, 
Pikesville, Maryland. Alvin is well re- 
membered for his participation in the 
activities of the Riding Club. 

O 

Married — Miss Miriam H. Prescott 
of Washington became the wife of Mr. 
Richard R. Irey, '33, on Saturday, Sep- 
tember 24. The newlyweds are making 
their home in Washington, D. C. 
O 

Birth — There are now four members 
of the Irvin 0. Wolf, '32, family with 
the birth of Harrison Ferrier on Octo- 
ber 1. Mrs. Wolf was formerly Myra 
Ferrier, '32, and a member of Kappa 
Kappa Gamma. Irvin belonged to Kap- 
pa Alpha and was former editor-in- 
chief of the yearbook. The Wolf's are 
now living at 513 North Boulevard, 
Richmond, Virginia. 
O 

Teaching — Jane Hilton, '38, is teach- 
ing in the Montgomery County High 
School this year. 



Civil Engineer — Robert E. Dunning, 
'33, a member of Theta Chi, and a 
captain in the R. 0. T. C, is now em- 
ployed by the Park Service of the In- 
terior Department. He resides at 6601 
West End Avenue, Chevy Chase. 
O 

Railroads — We are glad to know 
that Everett S. Lank of the class of 
'34 is still with the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road. Some of our alumni lost out in 
this last lay-off. Everett makes his 
home at 88 Van Peypen Street, Jersey 
City, New Jersey. 

O 

Lewis G. Phillips, '33, residing at 
1913 Randolph Street, N. E., Washing- 
ton, D. C, is employed by the United 
States Government at the Beltsville 
Research Center. He was an active 
and enthusiastic member of the Uni- 
versity band, and made a great con- 
tribution to it. 

O 

Hale French Schorn is on the staff 
of the Director of Research at the 
Beltsville Research Center. Schorn 
was a member of the class of 1930, and 
a prominent rifleman. He lives at 217 
Eastwood Avenue, Northwood Park, 
Silver Spring, Maryland. 
O 

Nicholas V. Stonestreet, '21, resides 
at the Cavanaugh Hotel, Harrisonburg, 
Virginia, and is employed by the U. S. 
Government in the Resettlement Ad- 
ministration. 

O 

Married — Miss Ruth Greenwood, '32, 
and Mr. Harold Rhind, '31, were marri- 
ed in June. Mrs. Rhind was a member 
of Tri Delta. Mr. Rhind is a grad in 
Engineering. 

O 

Baseball — "Moose" alias Mike Sur- 
gent and Harry Keller were diamond 
toilers for the Harrisonburg nine this 
summer in the Valley League. During 
a game with Staunton, in the same 
loop, two former Georgetown ball play- 
ers, Joe Keegin, and John Schmitt op- 
posed the Marylanders. The final 
score was Md. 6, Georgetown 5. 
O 

Law — A. Freeborn Brown, '37, of 
Havre de Grace, is associated with his 
father a prominent lawyer of Cecil 
County. In addition he is attending 
the University Law School in Balti- 
more. 



10 



Maryland Alumni News 



Medical Alumnus, at 90, Has 
Practiced 68 Years 

Dr. Talbott Observes Birthday Quietly. Graduated in 
1870. Once Carried Instruments, Pills in Saddlebags. 



OIX DECADES AGO a young doctor 

spurred his weary horse along the 
muddy roads of Arlington and Fairfax 
Counties in Virginia. In his saddle- 
bags were materials for the pills he 
rolled according to his own prescrip- 
tions; there were instruments for the 
ci ide surgery of the day, for pulling 
teeth, for all the many tasks a general 
practitioner of more than a half-cen- 
tury ago had to perform for his pa- 
tients. 

Celebrating his ninetieth birthday 
yesterday, that doctor was still active 
in his profession, though the horse and 
the saddlebags and the long rides in 
sun and snow and mud and dust are 
far behind him. In his office in Falls 
Church, Va., Dr. Thomas Melville Tal- 
bott receives his patients, administers 
to their needs and lifts the curtains of 
the past sometimes with those who 
knew him many years ago. 

He is not so well himself, suffering 
from an injury of 30 years ago when 
a frightened horse wrecked his buggy, 
• 

Candidate — Harold E. Naughton, '34, 
was nominated by the democratic par- 
ty of Allegany County for State Sen- 
ator at the recent primary election, 
defeating his opponents by a majority 
of nearly 2,000 votes. 

Harold is now practicing law in 
Cumberland. While attending the uni- 
versity he was outstanding in cross 
country and track. He is a member 
of Omicron Delta Kappa and Delta 
Sigma Phi. He was president of his 
Junior class and also president of the 
Intrafraternity Council. 
O 

Politics — Out in Ohio, Robert C. 
Oberlin, '32, won membership on the 
County Central Committee for Cuya- 
hoga County. This political activity 
is a sideline to "Bob" as his real busi- 
ness is that of a lawyer with offices in 
downtown Cleveland and considers 
studying another subject, Mechano- 
therapy, a special branch of medicine. 
O 

Statistician— Emily E. Klingel, '34, 
of New York, now is secretary and 
statistician for the Lehman Company 
in New York. Emily attended New 
York University where she took a 
course in psychology. 



and much of his present practice is 
from his bed. 

Dr. Talbott was born October 17, 
1848, in Montgomery County (Md.), 
near Whites Ferry. His early educa- 
tion was gathered in the grade schools 
of Poolesville, Md., and his first taste 
of higher learning in Columbia College 
(now George Washington University), 
where he was graduated. He received 
his degree in medicine at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland March 1, 1870. 

He began practice May 10, 1870. 

Even in the horse and buggy days, 
Dr. Talbott was progressive beyond 
most of his contemporaries. In 1880 
he caused somewhat more than a flurry 
of excitement when he installed the 
first telephone in Falls Church. It was 
a single-line affair, extending from his 
home to the village two miles away. 

One of the earliest subscribers to 
The Washington Post, Dr. Talbott has 
been reading the paper regularly since 
a few weeks after its establishment in 
1877.— (The Washington Post.) 

• 

Traveling — A former member of the 
Diamondback staff travels with the 
Navy. Donnie May Godwin, '37. Her 
father is commander of the U. S. S. 
Mississippi now in European waters. 
"Donnie" is a member of the Kappa 
Kappa Gamma sorority and was an 
active worker in the Riding Club. 
O 

Photograph — In the promotion de- 
partment of Harris & Ewing, pho- 
tographers, Washington, D. C, we find 
Dorothy May Cutler, '37. 
O 

Birth— Dr. and Mrs. Reginal T. Tru- 
itt announce the arrival of a baby girl, 
born August 25, last. Mrs. Truitt was 
formerly Miss Mary Virginia Harring- 
ton of Eastern Shore. Dr. Truitt, '14, 
is Director of the Chesapeake Biologi- 
cal Laboratory at Solomons Island and 
Professor of Aquiculture at the Uni- 
versity. The Truitts reside in College 
Park. 

O 

Married — Another Kappa Delta, 
Joan (Kitty) Wells, '37, and Mr. 
Charles Bowie Rose, were married 
December 31, 1937 in Baltimore. 



Coach— Coaching athletics and 
teaching is the occupation of James 
F. Zimmeiman, '37, at Thurmont High 
School, Maryland. 

O 

Tin — The well-known football and 
lacrosse star, Charles Ellinger, '37, is 
in the sales department of the Lyon 
Conklin and Co. in Baltimore. 
O 

Celanese — In the Celanese corpora- 
tion of America, is Wayne D. Irwin, 
'34, as chemical analyist and now plant 
chemist. He is a member of Alpha 
Chi Sigma. 

O 

Law — A former baseball star and 
football manager, Pete Chumbris, '35, 
has received his LL. B. degree from 
Georgetown University. Pete is a mem- 
ber of Omicron Delta Kappa. He is 
assistant librarian at Georgetown Law 
School. 

O 

Magazines — Rewrite man for the 
American Aviation Magazine is Her- 
bert L. Smith, Jr., '37, former sports 
editor for the Diamondback. Herb is 
a member of Phi Delta Theta. 
O 

Hotel — Asistant manager for the 
Dupont Circle Apartment Hotel is 
Tommy Robertson, former business 
manager for the Diamondback. Tommy 
is a member of Sigma Phi Sigma and 
Omicron Delta Kappa. 
O 

Kansas — A recent card was received 
about Robert M. Wick, who is now 
located at Wichita, Kansas. Here, Bob 
is connected with a building material 
concern. He would like very much to 
meet any Marylanders who happen to 
pass that way. 

O 

Condolence — The News extends its 
sincerest sympathy and that of the 
entire Alumni body to members who 
have recently suffered the loss of an 
immediate member of the family. To 
Frank and Gertrude Chesnut, '26, the 
News extends condolences on the death 
of their father, Mr. Victor K. Chesnut. 
To Mr. Stewart B. Shaw, '04, his two 
daughters, Helen and Anne, and to 
David Shaw the News extends the sin- 
cerest sympathy of the Alumni in the 
loss of wife and mother. During the 
many years that Mr. and Mrs. Shaw 
have lived in College Park their home 
has become a pleasant memory to 
many an undergraduate and returning 
alumnus, to whom the absence of Mrs. 
Shaw will be a great personal loss. 




15th Annual Homecoming 
PROGRAM 

Friday and Saturday, Oct. 28 and 29, 1938 
College Park 




C. Walter Cole, '21, 
Prcs. Alumni 



A. A. Parker, '04, 
Pres. "M" Club 



FRIDAY 



SATURDAY, 



* * * 

2:30 P.M. — Football — Junior Varsity, Maryland vs. Pennsylvania. 
7 P.M. — Annual Homecoming Bonfire and Pep Rally, Campus. 
9:30 P.M. — Annual Homecoming Dance, Ritchie Coliseum. 

Five Prizes for Tacky Dance $1.50 per Couple or Stag. 

9 A.M. — Registration for Alumni, Ritchie Coliseum. 
10 A.M. — Football — Freshman vs. V. M. I. Freshman. 
12 Noon — Annual Freshman-Sophomore Tug-O-War. Paint Branch. 
12:15 P.M. — Alumni Buffet Luncheon, Ritchie Coliseum. 
12:30 P.M.— Soccer Game— Drill Field. 

1 P.M. — Inspection of fraternity and sorority house decorations. 
2:30 P.M. — Football — Maryland vs. Virginia Military Institute. 
Reserve seats, $1.50. General Admission, 75 cents. Float parade at half time. 

5 P.M. — Annual "M" Club Meeting, University Gymnasium. 
5:15 P.M. — Alumni Mixer, buffet supper and dance. Entertainment 
University Gymnasium, $1.00 per person. Alumni, faculty and friends invited. 

* * * 

Fraternity and sorority houses are to be decorated in gala Homecoming fashion, giving emphasis to hospital- 
ity and a real "Old Line" welcome. Those having special functions for Alumni are as follows: 

Alpha Gamma Rho — Buffet supper and dance. 

Alpha Tau Omega — Buffet supper and dance. 

Delta Sigma Phi — Dinner and dance. 

Kappa Alpha — Supper and dance. 

Lambda Chi Alpha — Buffet supper and dance. 

Phi Sigma Kappa — Host to professional fraternity. Supper and dance. 

Phi Delta Theta — Supper and dance. 

Sigma Nu — Supper and dance. 

Sigma Phi Sigma — Buffet supper and dance. 

Theta Chi — Alumni Dinner — Entertainment. 

AlphaOmicron Pi — Buffet supper. 

Alpha Xi Delta — Host to Nursing School students, Buffet supper. 

Kappa Kappa Gamma — Buffet supper. 

Kappa Delta — Open house — Buffet supper. 

Delta Delta Delta — Buffet supper. 

* * * 

Those Alumni who might desire over night accommodation communicate with the Alumni secretary for reser- 
vations. These will be made as reasonable and as near the campus as possible. 



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NOVEMBER » 1938 



Maryland Alumni News 



HOMECOMING SNAPSHOTS » » » 




Volume X 



MARYLAND ALUMNI NEWS, NOVEMBER, 1938 



Number 6 



Alumni Association-University of Maryland 



Founded in 1892 

♦ 

Officers for 1938-39 

C. WALTER COLE, '21, President 
Towson, Md. 



Cover Picture 
—Dining Hall 



Charles W. Sylvester, '08, Vice-Pesident 
Baltimore, Md. 



G. F. Pollock, '23, Sec-Treasurer 
College Park, Md. 



Alumni Board 

Note — The officers named above are also members of the Alumni Board) 
Reuben Brigham, '08, P. W. Chichester, '20, Education 

Arts and Sciences John A. Silkman, '35, Agriculture 

Charles V. Koons, '29, Engineering Ruth Miles, '31, Home Economics 

Members at Large 

Esther Hughes Lee, '33, Women's Rep. J. Donald Kieffer, '30, Men's Rep. 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Editor 

Maryland Alumni News, issued monthly by the University of Maryland 
Alumni Association at College Park, Md., as second-class matter under the Act 
of Congress of March 3, 1879. 

Annual Alumni Association dues are $2.00. One year's subscription to 
Alumni News, 50 cents. 

Group Leaders 

Allegany Coun'y: E. Brooke Whiting. '98, President; Dr. Joseph Franklin. '21, Secretary, Cum- 
berland, Md. 

Baltimore County: C. Walter Cole, '21, President; H. B. Derrick. '17, Secretary, Towson, Md. 

Baltimore City: Chester Tawney, '31, President, 4022 Roland Avenue; E. Gordon Hammond, '34, 
Secretary, 1023 W. Barre Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Caroline County: George W. Clendaniel. '20, President, Denton; Dr. Maurice A. Brackett, '21, 
Treasurer, Denton; Mrs. George W. Clendaniel, '21, Secretary, Denton. 

Harford County: W. B. Munnikhuysen, '14, President; H. M. Carroll, '20, Secretary, Bel Air, Md. 

Frederick County: J. Homer Remsberg, '18, President; Henry R. Shoemaker, '17, Secretary, 
Frederick, Md. 

Montgomery County: Lawrence G. Smoot, '18, President, Kensington, Md. ; Mary Fisher, '36, 
Secretary, Rockville, Md. 

New York City: Donald Kieffer, '30, President, 195 Broadway; Sarah Morris, '25, Secretary, 
140 E. 63rd Street, New York City. 

Philadelphia: A. Moulton McNutt, '06, President, 413 Cooper Street, Camden, N. J.; J. P. Mudd, 
'07, Secretary, 173 Manheim Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pittsburgh: E. Minor Wenner, '27, President, 1111 Gladys Avenue; Dr. A. A. Krieger, '32, Sec- 
retary, Highland Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Washington, D. C: J. Douglas Wallop, '19, President, 6139 N. Dakota Avenue, N. W. ; Charles V. 
Koons, '29, Secretary, 419 Fourth Street, N. E., Washington. 

Washington County: Hon. Henry Holzapfel, Jr., '93, President. Hagerstown. Md. ; L. G. Mathias, 
'23, Secretary, Hagerstown, Md. 

"M" Club Officers and Board Members 



President— Donald H. Adams. '28. 
Vice-President A. K. Besley, '23. 



Secretary-Treas. — Dr. E. N. Cory, '09. 
Historian— W. R. Maslin, '09. 



REPRESENTATIVES 



Baseball— G. F. Pollock, '23. 
Basket-Bail— H. B. Shipley. 14, 
Boxing — Stewart McCaw, '35. 
Lacrosse — James Stevens, '19. 
Track — Lewis W. Thomas, '28. 



Tennis — James Busick, '35. 
Cross Country — Charles Remsberg, '26. 
Football— W. C. Supplee, '26. 
At Large — Dr. E. B. Friedenwald, '03. 
Dr. A. W. Valentine, '04. 



Construction under the government 
two and one half million dollar build- 
ing program took another promising 
step towards development Wednesday 
with the beginning of excavation work 
for an additional wing to the Dining 
Hall. 



Fellow Alumni: 

/~VUR football team has just completed 
another gridiron season. While it 
may not have been a brilliant season 
no one can say that the Old Liner did 
not present the best team available 
from the material at hand. A number 
of the boys were new at the varsity 
competition and when several of the 
regulars were sent to the side lines 
with injuries they lost some of the sus- 
taining moral so vital in this great 
game. 

Regardless of the record the boys 
closed the season with a spectacular 
performance to win from the Generals 
of Washington and Lee. They seemed 
to find themselves when Rip Hewitt, 
a senior and playing his last game 
seemed to supply the needed spark and 
they were off. My congratulations to 
the boys and as one Alumnus said, "we 
with our heads up to carry on." 

In spite of the miserable weather on 
Thanksgiving Day I was glad to see 
quite a few of the old boys come out 
in the snow and rain to cheer the 
Terps on. Win, lose or draw if the 
Alumni will always give the true dis- 
play of Old Line spirit I am sure thei'e 
will be no concern as to what will be the 
achievements of the Terps. Let's have 
a banner year for the Alumni Associa- 
tion as the first step toward success 
for one and all, our Alma Mater. 

Sincerely yours, 

C. Walter Cole, '21, 

President. 



Maryland Alumni News 



Homecoming Colorful 

TN spite of the efforts of the old man 
■*■ weather, the spirit and color at 
Homecoming, October 29, was up to 
top form. A splendid return of old 
grads was recorded by the Alumni 
Office and the fraternities and sorori- 
ties. As one Alumnus who returned 
to the campus on Friday said before 
he left Sunday, "I had a grand and 
glorious time and never a dull mo- 
ment. It seemed as if something was 
going on every minute." True enough, 
there was something going on Friday 
afternoon until Saturday night. 
Tied Penn Jayvees 
On Friday, Maryland's Jayvees play- 
ed the University of Pennsylvania Jay- 
vees a tie football game. That night 
the Annual Homecoming Dance was 
held in the Ritchie Coliseum. The 
dance was held Friday, which was a 
change from the past, for the purpose 
of giving the Fraternities and Sorori- 
ties an opportunity for their functions 
on Saturday night. At the Homecom- 
ing Dance several contests for prizes 
were held. The first, a Jitterbug Dance, 
followed by a Tacky Costume Parade 
with prizes being awarded for the most 
unique and most humorous costumes 
for both girls and boys. The winners 
were: Elaine Danforth, George Meeks, 
Margaret Meiser and David Sheridan. 
The Coliseum was decorated in Hallo- 
ween fashion with cider in the fodder 
shocks and ginger snaps for refresh- 
ments. 

Registration 

Saturday morning a splendid group 
of Faculty, Alumni and Student rep- 
resentation assembled at the Coliseum 
to serve as a reception committee, 
headed by Dr. L. B. Broughton, '08. 
The Freshmen Footballers started the 
Saturday program at 10 A. M. in a 
game with the V. M. I. Freshmen. At 
noon the traditional Soph-Frosh Tug-o- 
war over the banks of Paint Branch 
left the Sophs supreme. On the drill 
field the extramural soccerites engaged 
a team from Frostburg Teacher's Col- 
lege. Maryland won. Between 12 and 
1 o'clock, the Alumni gathered at the 
Ritchie Coliseum and had a buffet 
lunch, but it was not long before the 
band appeared and the parade was on. 
House Decorations 

Before the game a special committee 
toured College Park and judged the 
house decorations of all fraternities 
and sororities. The general theme was 
an expression of hospitality and wel- 



» 



» 



« 



come to our visitors and returning old 
grads. 

At 2 P. M. the kick off started the 
annual clash between the Virginia Mili- 
tary Institute and the Maryland Terra- 
pins. Many exciting moments enter- 
tained the old grads. During half time, 
the student organizations took part in 
a competitive float parade. Coming out 
on top was the Terrapins Trailer Club 
to be followed close by Alpha Xi Delta. 
Winners of the House Decorating com- 
petition was the Kappa Kappa Gamma 
sorority. 

"M" Club Meeting 

Immediately following the game, the 
annual "M" Club meeting was held in 
the University Gymnasium. During 
the meeting the wives and friends of 
the "M" Club and many other Alumni 
assembled for an Alumni Mixer, buffet 
supper and dance. Entertainment at 
this affair was generously presented 
by the student Glee Club, Girls' Chorus 
and Orchestra. Following the enter- 
tainment, the Alumni danced and hob- 
nobbed until the curtain fell at mid- 
night. 

Practically every Fraternity and 
Sorority had a capacity return of old 
grads. Each had a function immedi- 
diately following the game and later 
had dancing. 

Homecoming this year, despite the 
inclement weather, was probably the 
greatest ever held at College Park. 
For the benefit of those who were not 
here, the news is printing the follow- 
ing list of those who were here. Fel- 
low Alumni, when you are not here, 
many friends miss you, and you miss 
a real big time. Among those present 
were: 1888, H. B. McDonnell; 1892, 
F. W. Besley; 1894, F. B. Bomberger; 
1895, R. L. Harrison, P. C. Prough, 
W. W. Skinner; 1897, Lewis Lake; 1900, 
Harvey Kefauver; 1902, T. B. Symons; 
1903, Preston Peach, E. Walls, J. L. 
Devon; 1904, A. W. Valentine; 1905, 
W. White; 1906, Henry Harrison, 1907, 
J. W. Bird; 1908, F. Mackall, L. B. 
Broughton, U. Long, G. C. Day, E. 
Oswald; 1909, C. M. Bishop, E. N. 
Cory. W. R. Maslin, A. Claude Turner. 
1910, H. H. Allen. John Bauer; 1911, 
Alex Paterson, J. W. Kinghorn; 1912, 
W. B. Kemp, W. Hillegeist, H. Gill; 

1913, J. J. Wanneuwetch, A. M. Todd; 

1914, F. S. Hoffecker, J. Ben Robin- 
son, R. V. Truitt; 1916, L. R. Smoot, L. 
E. Bopst, John Sterling; 1917, S. Ruff, 
D. Howard; 1918, J. H. Remsberg, 



F. B. Rakemann, Robert Forrest; 1919, 
J. W. Stevens, R. L. Sellman, D. Wal- 
lop, Jr., C. Horine, M.D., R. Lewis, Jr.; 
1920, G. W. Clendaniel, H. M. Car- 
roll, Peter Chichester; 1921, C. W. 
Cole; 1922, W. W. Kirby, Mildred 
Jones, A. W. Kines; 1923, Hai-old 
Robertson, Alma H. Preinkert, Kirk 
Besley, R. M. Watkins, L. P. Downin, 
L. W. Bosley. 

1924, G. J. Luckey, R. G. Rothgeb, 
Portia M. Filbert; 1925, L. G. Worth- 
ington, Mrs. Geary Eppley, E. Zalesak, 
James Hubbard, Al Schrader, J. W. 
Magruder, A. D. Parian, Julius Parran, 
Mabel Nash; 1926, G. Dent, Jr., J. H. 
Bonds, Jr., A. Skinner; 1927, E. I. 
Baumgartner, Collins, Estella Baldwin, 
S. L. Crosthwait, Pete Snouffer, Suzie 
Snouffer; 1928, Lewis Thomas, Jr., 
May Wood, M. L. Howard, Paul Deems, 
D.D.S., Joseph Harrison; 1929, Her- 
man Epstein, Richard Hughes; 1930, 
J. D. Kieffer, G. Madigan, Warren My- 
ers, Robert Remsberg, J. J. Keane, 
M. Whiteley; 1931, D. A. Edmonds, 
M. D.; 1932, W. Burslem, W. M. Han- 
na; 1933, J. R. Mitchell, Samuel Gla- 
kerg, Jr.; 1934, Dick Baldwin, Louise 
Reinohl, John Stottlemyer, James C. 
Robertson, Jr., E. R. Rabbitt; 1935, 
Edward Daminski, F. S. McCaw; 1936, 
Chester Cissel, Pete King, Alton 
Rabbitt; 1937, Margaret Williams; 

1937, Paul Mobus; Dr. J. C. Hack, 
DD.S., Dr. Edwards, DD.S.; 1938, J. 
Logan Schutz, Mary E. Townsend, Ed- 
ward O. Shepherd, M. Maxine White, 
F. Deen Evans, Wilmer Steiner, Myr- 
tle Bopst. 

Visiting Alumnae at Kappa Delta 
1938, Vera Hutton; 1937, Edith Haz- 
ard; 1923, Alma H. Preinkert; 1937, 
Anne R. Bourke, Loretta M. Dolan, 
Dot Minker; 1936, Flo Small; 1937, 
Jeanette Chatham; 1934, Louise Rein- 
ohl; 1936, Marion H. Colton; 1938, 
Margaret Wilson; 1938, Dorothy Dan- 
forth; 1935, Helen Klingsohr; 1938, 
Mary Dow; 1938, Peggy Thomas. 
Visiting Alumni at Kappa Alpha 
1936, Edwin Ruzicka; 1936, Mere- 
dith Wilson; 1938, William Mullett; 

1938, George Watson; 1936, Ed Min- 
ion; 1936, Howard Vernay; 1927, Wil- 
liam Hill, Jr.; 1925, B. S. Simmon; 
1936, John Christhilf; 1918, F. B. 
Rakemans, wife and daughter; 1897, 
E. Palmer Fluff; 1931, Joseph Deck- 
man; 1936, Charles Ellinger. 
Visiting Alumnae at Delta Delta Delta 

1936, Dorothy Allen; 1937, Alice 
Ayers; 1937, Frances Garner; 1936, 
Routh Hickey; 1931, Felicia Jenkins; 

(Continued on Page 5) 



November, 1938 



Medical Library 
First Of Its Kind 

The University of Maryland, found- 
ed 1807, was the first medical college 
in the country to establish a library. 
Formed in November, 1813, by the 
purchase of Dr. John Crawford's per- 
sonal collection, the library is now ob- 
serving its 125th anniversary of serv- 
ice. 

During the early years of its exist- 
ence the small collection of books was 
housed in the Provost's office in the 
Medical College building. As the num- 
ber of volumes increased more com- 
modious quarters were sought and in 
1905 an old church building was pur- 
chased for the library. Renamed Da- 
vidge Hall, in honor of Dr. John Beale 
Davidge, this structure still houses the 
library. Extensive remodeling in the 
fall of 1937 has converted it into an 
attractive and serviceable building. 

One of the outstanding features of 
the library is the Crawford Collection 
of historical medical books. Many of 
them offer fine examples of the book- 
binding during the seventeenth and 
eighteenth centuries. Some are bound 
in vellum and parchment, others in 
calf and deerskin, with designs in 
gold and blind tooling. Another inter- 
esting and important set are the 189 
volumes containing the thesis submit- 
ted for the degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine from 1817 to 1868. Many of them 
are written in Latin; others have 
unique embellishments of ribbons, fan- 
cy pictures, or pen-and-ink sketches, 
according to the taste of the writer. 

From a small beginning 125 years 
ago the library has grown until it now 
numbers some 19,000 volumes. No 
reference to the library would be com- 
plete without mention of a few of the 
men who have worked in its behalf. 
Professor Randolph Winslow, Profes- 
sor John R. Winslow, and Dr. Winslow 
proved their love by generous gifts 
and unceasing interest. Under the able 
guidance of Dr. Carroll Lockard, for 
the past decade chairman of the Li- 
brary Committee, the library has wit- 
nessed its greatest growth. 

With a fresh realization of our needs 
and the will to succeed may the next 
period of our history be even more 
fruitful than the past. 

Ruth Lee Briscoe 

• 
Photographer — Herbie Smith, '37, is 
in the News department of Harris and 
Ewing, nationally known photogra- 
phers of Washington, D. C. 




Davidge Hall, Library of The School of Medi( 



Homecoming Colorful 

(Continued from Page i) 

1928, Mrs. Alma Marshall; 1927, Jes- 
sie Muncaster; 1929, Mary Murray; 
1936, Leora Sanford, Frances Walsh; 
1934, Doris Zabel; 1938, Anne Beal; 
1938, Ruth Peper (Ruth Knight) ; 1938, 
Arlene McLaughlin. 

Visiting Alumnae at Alpha Omicron Pi 
1936, Anna Marie Quirk Tydings; 
1936, Betty Quirk; 1936 Carolyn Vogt; 
1933, Marion B. Daniels; 1934, Sarah 
L. Short; 1927, Elizabeth Taylor; 1928, 
(1930, M.A.) Evelyn Kuhnle; 1933, 
Bertha C. Carter; 1931, Mildred Ket- 
tler; 1936, Edith Breckbill; 1934, Elga 
Jarboe; 1934, Helen McFerren; 1937, 
Ruth Summerville; 1938, Ruth Reville; 

1933, Norma Shook. 

Visiting Alumni at Alpha Gamma Rho 
1931, Arthur Ahalt; 1936, Fitz Bart- 
lett; 1929, Myron Berry; 1933, Roger 
Burdette; 1936, Chester Cissel; 1938, 
J. N. DeCecco; 1938, Ralph Clark; 
1938, Clinton Brookhart; 1931, James 
Coddington; 1933, Edward Connelly; 

1934, John Cotton; 1935, Charles Cun- 
ningham; 19 , Samuel De Vault; 
1934, Benjamin Evans; 1926, William 
Evans; 1933, Lloyd Eiler; 1939, Thom- 
as Gordon; 1938, Abram Gottwals; 

1929, Arthur Hamilton; 1932, Miles 
Hanna; 1937, Scott James; 1938, Al- 
bin Kuhn; 19 , Edgar Long; 1936, 
John Lovell; 1937, Marker Lovell; 
1925, John Magruder; 1933, Wilbur 
McCann; 1937, Burton McFadden; 
1936, Paul Mullinix; 1935, Milton Pep- 
er; 1935, Paul Poffenberger; 1928, Bur- 
well Powell; 1930, Arthur Schreiber; 
1938, Edward Shepard; 1933, Kenneth 
Spessard; 1935, Daniel Stoner; 1934, 
Eugene Thomas; 1937, Kenneth Waga- 



man; 1937, Stanley Watson; 1938, 
Paul Wintermoyer. 
Visiting Alumni at Lambda Chi Alpha 
19 , J. Brooks Boyle; 1933, Richard 
W. Higgins; 1924, Richard T. Rizer; 
1924, W. B. Penn; 1933, J. W. Miller; 
1931, P. M. Ambrose; 1933, Wm. L. 
Rice; 1932, Wm. F. Lines; 1937, Doran 
S. Piatt; 1937, Christen F. Richer; 

1937, Kenneth A. Stambaugh; 1936, 
John H. Fales; 1937, R. Bernard 
Graeves; 1936, Fred W. Sieling; 1934, 
Stanley C. Lore; 1936, J. Gardner 
Brook; 1931, Candler H. Hoffman; 
1934, Douglas R. Knox. 

Visiting Alumni at Sigma Phi Sigma 
1935, T. C. Coleman; 1935, T. Cor- 
win; 1934, F. Cutting; 1928, F. D. 
Evans; 19 , J. C. Guill; 1932, H. R. 
Gibson; 19 , F. A. Johnson; 1933, 
L. J. Jones; 1934, D. Kelly; 1930, W. J. 
Kinnamon; 1936, D. Larner; 1931, J. A. 
Lee; 1936, H. McCarthy; 1938, J. Mc- 
Intyre; 1936, B. Pfau; 1915, J. C. Ster- 
ling; 1934, W. W. Steiner; 1935, W. 
Talkes; 1933, G. O. Weber; 1932, J. E. 
Welch; 1929, C. M. Wilson; 1930, H. 
Wilson. 

Visiting Alumni at Sigma Nu 

1933, "Smokey" Wood; 1936, Fred 
Breuckner; 1937, Paul Mobus; 1937, 
Oden Bowie; 1939, William Crampton; 

1938, Carleton Wahl; 1937, Victor Wil- 
lis; 1938, Logan Schutz; 1934, "Spider" 
Chase; 1938, Perry Hay; 1938, Robert 
Walton; 1937, Albert Waters; 1932, 
Louis Berger; 1935, Bucky Busher; 
1932, Jack Norris; 1919, Henry Walls; 
1931, Warren Rabbitt; 1936, Gardner 
Brooks; 1936, Lyman McAboy; 1937, 
Jack Downin; 1937, "Kip" Edwards; 
1921, Austin Digges; 1936, Dick Nel- 
son. 



Maryland Alumni News 



Haines Celebrates 
33rd Anniversary 

Founders Week Celebi'ation was a 
great jubilee for Mahlon N. Haines, 
'96, the Shoe Wizard of York, Penn- 
sylvania. It was the 33rd anniversary 
of a man who has become an eminent 
citizen of the community. His philan- 
thropic disposition has won for him a 
place in the hearts of many of his 
fellowmen. 

Colonel Haines was born and raised 
in Washington, D. C, came to the 
Maryland Agriculture College in 1892 
and while a student won the individual 
cadet honors in the manual of arms, 
also gold medal in track. Following 
his departure from college he entered 
the shoe business in Washington. In 
1905 he went to York, Pennsylvania, 
and began what has since become the 
greatest chain of shoe stores owned by 
one man in the country. 

Colonel Haines' ancestry includes: 
the hearty Norseman, daring English- 
men, canny Scotchmen and wild Irish- 
men, so when you think of Haines, 
remember the stock he came from — 
strong physical, athletic, hardy, brave, 
fearless — with deep convictions — when 
word is given it is carried out. One 
who loves and hates to the end; who 
will never take unfair advantage of 
one, but at the same time expects the 
one on the other side to live up to his 
bargain. When he believes he is right 
nothing on earth will change him, no 
threats, no argument, no pressure — he 
stands like a rock — perhaps alone — 
what matters to him — so remember 
these things — you can see Haines in 
action. Going to York 33 years ago, 
single, penniless and alone in a strange 
land and new people to contact, new 
difficulties to overcome, and he did. 

Colonel Haines has a great love for 
the outdoors. His palatial farm called 
Haines Acres is his favorite retreat 
where he can don the overalls and 
join in the manual work. He also en- 
joys fun and play, often taking part 
in games with the children. Prac- 
tically every person in York, Penn- 
sylvania, has been the beneficiary in 
some way or another of the generosity 
of Mahlon Haines. Colonel Haines 
has a family of three boys, all interest- 
ed in the shoe business. 

On behalf of the Alumni Association 
the News takes this occasion to ex- 
tend congratulations and best wishes 
to Mahlon N. Haines, a member of the 
class of 1896. 



1894 



1938 




Mahlon N. Ha in 



Old Line Spirit 
In The Family 

When preparations were being made 
for the fifteenth annual Homecoming 
this fall, it was leai-ned that Katherine 
Jean Shea, '40, a member of Alpha Xi 
Delta, is the daughter of Dr. John J. 
Shea, '12, D. D. S. Another member 
of the family, Miss Katherine V. Shea, 
'13, is a graduate in Nursing. 

When the time arrived for Jean to 
go to college, even with her high school 
associates going elsewhere, the pull of 
the Old Line spirit of her dad and aunt 
was so impressing that to Maryland 
came Jean. Her description is, "I en- 
joy it more and more every day." 

Her father is a practicing dentist 
in Holyoke, Massachusetts, and her 
aunt is Hospital Administrator in An- 
napolis, Maryland. 



Army — Ben Shrewbridge, '38, and 
former cadet major, now is taking the 
one year army training course at Fort 
Washington. Ben, a Baltimore pro- 
duct is a member of Phi Sigma 
Kappa. 



Terrapin Trailers 
Win Twice 

When the parade of floats stopped at 
the north end of Byrd Stadium on the 
fifteenth annual Homecoming, the win- 
ning float was the Terrapin Trailor 
presented by the Terrapin Trail Club. 
This float was a replica of the Dia- 
mondback Terrapin followed by a 
trailer. Perched atop the Terrapin was 
Georgianna Calver, the guidinng light 
for Bill Voying who was driving the 
car. 

The following Monday the enthusi- 
asm over their victory urged them to 
enter the Terp in the Washington Hal- 
loween Parade with the thought of 
only fun. But so original and unique 
was the float that another prize was 
brought to the campus. It was the 
Fred Buckholz trophy, for the most 
uniquely decorated vehicle in the Hal- 
loween Parade on Constitution Avenue. 
Those who deserve a lot of praise for 
the success of the float were Dick 
Bridge, Henry Lemmon, Janet Wyvill, 
Bill Yoying and manager J. P. Secrest. 
The president of the club is Ned Hep- 
burn and secretary is Georgianna Cal- 
ver. 



November, 1938 



Arboretum Receives Gift 



» 



» 



» 



The Federated Garden Clubs recently presented the University a beautiful 
hand forged, wrought iron marker (see cut) for the Nature Trail of the Uni- 
versity Arboretum, located at the 
northeast corner of the campus. Pre- 
sentation was made to Professor A. S. 
Thurston by Mrs. Charles Peace, chair- 
man of the Conservation Committee of 
the Federated Garden Clubs. In April, 
1937, the Federated Garden Clubs 
formally dedicated the Nature Trail, 
which has been developed since 1935 




■^^wr. 








i 



by Professor Thurston. The 
Nature Trail extends 
through the wooded area 
of the Arboretum and has 
been planted with nearly 



6,000 plants of about 100 species of native flowers and shrubs. 



Strange Malady Cured, 
Woman Dentist Weds 

A week prior to her wedding Dr. 
Carlotta Augusta Hawley, an attrac- 
tive 24-year-old Washington dentist, 
was stricken with a strange malady 
which sent her temperature at times 
as high as 106 degrees. 

The day preceding the wedding, Dr. 
Hawley's illness was gone as suddenly 
and mysteriously as it appeared, and 
she became the bride of a Maryland 
University classmate, Dr. William Mit- 
ten, Jr., also a dentist, a resident of 
Balboa, Canal Zone. 

Today, she was on her honeymoon. 

Through an agonizing week of un- 
certainty while she lay critically ill, 
Dr. Hawley declined to postpone her 
wedding. She remained in bed until 
a few hours before the ceremony at 
All Souls' Unitarian Church. After- 
wards she attended a reception at the 
home of her mother, Mrs. Charles Au- 
gustus Hawley of 2609 Woodley Place 
N. W., and then she and Doctor Mitten 
left on their wedding trip. 

After traveling in this country, Doc- 
tor Mitten and his bride will go to 
Balboa, where they will practice to- 
gether. 

Doctor Hawley, who passed the Dis- 
trict of Columbia dental examination 
in 1936, and Doctor Mitten first met 
six years ago when they were students 
at Maryland. 



Youngest Instructor 

The youngest instructor in the Uni- 
versity is William Howard "Billy" 
Nalley, aged nine months, who will 
teach "Advance Principles of Child 
Study, to a group of eight Practice 
House coeds. 

"Billy" will take his place in the six 
weeks' practice house curriculum along 
with cooking, marketing, houseclean- 
ing, entertaining, and the other home 
arts taught to the girls. He will give 
a comprehensive and practical five day 
short course to each girl during which 
time she will act as nurse for his 
various needs. 

"Billy" is the son of Mrs. Paula 
Nalley, 22, who is one of the group of 
eight coeds taking the course. Mrs. 
Nalley left school to marry during her 
junior year and this fall decided to 
return to complete work for her de- 
gree. 

Mrs. Nalley is majoring in "Foods" 
in the Home Economics College, and 
had to take her six weeks' turn in 
practical housekeeping along with the 
other seniors. This brought up the 
question of what to do with Billy dur- 
ing the six weeks' work. So Billy 
teaches while mother studies. 

• 
Intern — Milton J. Meyer, '34, who 
received his M. D. in '37, is doing his 
internship at Cumberland Hospital, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



"M" Club Elects 
Adams, 28, President 

At the annual meeting of the "M" 
Club held on Homecoming Day, Donald 
H. Adams, '28, former gridiron and 
basket-ball star for the Old Liners, 
was elected president for the ensuing 
year. Don succeeds Dr. A. A. Parker, 
'04, of Pocomoke City. 

"Don," as we call him, is a member 
of the Sigma Nu fraternity and was 
president of his class for three years. 
He was very active in student affairs 
for which gained him membership in 
the national honorary leadership fra- 
ternity, Omicron Delta Kappa. Since 
becoming an alumnus Don's interest 
in the school and its affairs has carried 
on. He has taken an active part in 
the Old Line Club in Washington, 
served on the Alumni Board and was a 
member of the Old Line bowling team 
of the District of Columbia which won 
the collegiate championship three con- 
secutive seasons. 

The hotel and restaurant equipment 
business occupies Don's main time. He 
married Miss Eleanor Freeney, '27, a 
member of Kappa Kappa Gamma and 
they reside in Chevy Chase, Md. 

Other officers to be elected were A. 
K. Besley, '23, a football and baseball 
star in his college days. Kirk is the 
son of an alumnus, Fred W. Besley, 
'92, State Forester for Maryland. Kirk 
has a doctor's degree in bacteriology 
and is connected with the Beltsville 
Station of the U. S. D. A. 

Representatives elected to the Board 
for the coming year were: Boxing, 
Stewart McCaw, '35, now an instructor 
in physical education, football, W. C. 
Supplee, '26, and historian, W. R. 
Maslin, '09. 

• 

Gertrude Chestnut, '26, 
Captures Air Derby 

Beating her closest rival by 25 min- 
utes, Gertrude Chestnut, '26, attractive 
young Hyattsville aviatrix and Capi- 
tal newspaperwoman, won the Wash- 
ington Air Derby Association's aerial 
landmark hunt in record time at the 
College Park (Md.) Airport. 

Gertrude, flying with Earl Stein- 
hauer of 2901 Sixteenth Street as her 
observer, spotted six landmarks and 
set her plane down on the runway at 
College Park Airport at College Park 
just 18 minutes after the hunt began. 

Her performance was the fastest 
ever turned in for a contest of that 
type sponsored by the local association. 



8 Maryland Alumni News 



« 



OLD LINE ATHLETICS 



» 



» 



Some Good Talent 
On Freshman Team 

Maryland's freshman squad, ably 
coached by Al Woods, who was as- 
sisted by Bill Bryant, 1937, end, won 
three out of five games, a fine record 
considering the opposition. 

While there is quite a jump from 
yearling football to the caliber needed 
for success on the varsity, there ap- 
parently is quite a bit of talent that 
will be handy to have on the big team 
next year. Some of them, of course, 
will fall by the wayside scholastically, 
so it is not good policy to count too 
heavily on any of them so far in 
advance. 

However, Mearle Duvall, Jim Dunn, 
Elmer Rigby, Bernie Ulman, John 
Cordyack and Donald Shockey, backs, 
Charlie Bowers and Ashton Garrett, 
ends; Ralph Burlin, tackle; Larry Mac- 
Kenzie and Charles Pottoroff, guards, 
and Edwin Bader and Jim Wharton, 
centers, displayed ability that marked 
them as good prospects. 

Others, too, may develop and at least 
20 of the 27 who stayed out all year 
should come up to the varsity squad. 

The young Terps lost to Washington 
and Lee, 0-6, but greatly outgained 
their rivals; they battled a much more 
powerful Georgetown team to a stand- 
still before bowing, 13-21, and defeated 
a fine V. M. I. outfit, 13 to 6; George 
Wellington, 25-0, and Western Mary- 
land, 39-0. 

For those who like names and sta- 
tistics of players we are printing the 
roster of the yearlings. It will be no- 
ticed that most of the boys are home 
talent. 

• 

Large Ring Squad 
Is Hard At Work 

Lieut. Col. Harvey Miller and his 
associate coach, Capt. William H. Mag- 
lin, have the varsity boxers hard at 
work but not enough has been done to 
give a real line on the team that does 
not open its season until the middle of 
January. 

Benny Alperstein, national 125- 
pound champion, and Nathan Askin, 
135-pounder, and George Dorr, 115, 
are leftovers who give a good nucle- 
us. Newton Cox, 165, and Jose de 
Perralta, 145, are others from last 



By W. H. ("Bill") HOTTEL 

Terps Have Worst 
Gridiron Season 

Maryland, with grid aces lost com- 
pletely through injuries or illness and 
constantly retarded by hurts to others, 
wound up its worst season in modern 
football when it defeated Washington 
and Lee in the Baltimore Stadium 
Thanksgiving Day, 19 to 13. 

Prior to playing the Generals, the 
Terps had dropped all but one of their 
previous eight tilts, their lone triumph 
being over Western Maryland, 14-8, in 
one of the best games the team played 
all year. 

Maryland's finest fight, though, was 
a losing one. It performed a great 
feat in holding Georgetown's powerful 
and undefeated outfit to a 7-14 score 
at College Park on November 19 and 
came within a hair's breadth of scor- 
ing one of the biggest upsets of the 
campaign. 

A fuller review of the season will be 
given in the next issue, but here are 
the scores of the games up to the 
turkey day affair: 

Maryland, 6; Richmond, 19. 

Maryland, 0; Penn State, 33. 

Maryland, 0; Syracuse, 53. 

Maryland, 14; West. Maryland, 8. 

Maryland, 17; Virginia, 29. 

Maryland, 14; V. M. I., 47. 

Maryland, 7; Florida, 21. 

Maryland, 7; Georgetown, 14. 
The Terps outgained Florida and 
doubtless would have won had it not 
been for costly fumbling. Outside of 
Penn State and Syracuse, Georgetown 
was the strongest team Maryland met. 
Maryland's previous worst record 
since football was put on a sound basis 
at College Park was in 1925 when two 
games were won, five lost and one tied. 
The total scoring this year against the 
Terps was the heaviest on record. 

year who should deliver this season, 
and there appears to be other poten- 
tial talent among the large number of 
candidates. 

Things will have shaped up by an- 
other month so a better line may be 
given on the outlook. However, Miller 
doesn't hesitate to say he'll have a 
better team than last winter. 



Basket-ball Team 
Offers Problem 

Starting early and facing a 23-game 
schedule with very limited talent, coach 
Burton Shipley has a big job on his 
hands in varsity basket-ball this sea- 
son. 

He will have only 12 candidates, 
most of them inexperienced, and under 
the fast pace that has been created by 
the changed rules, two complete teams 
of ability are almost essential to a 
successful campaign. 

George Knepley, all-Southern Con- 
ference guard; Eddie Johnson, center 
or forward; Pershing Mondorff, guard; 
Francis Beamer, Adam Bengoechea 
and Bill Rea are the leftovers from 
last fall, but only the first two, who 
are seniors, were regulars. 

He gets a fine forward in George 
Dewitt, a sophomore, but he is the 
only rookie who may be of great value 
to him this season. Other sophs added 
to the roster are Frank Dwyer, Dick 
Shaffer and Gene Ochsenreiter. 

With Penn State being played in an 
exhibition game on December 3 at 
State College and three other clashes 
carded before Christmas, Shipley was 
handicapped by the fact that Beamer, 
Dwyer and Shaffer were with the foot- 
ball squad until the season closed with 
the Washington and Lee game Thanks- 
giving. 

All have been toiling for sometime 
except these three but every man was 
badly needed to whip a team in shape 
for such an early beginning. 

Knepley, Johnson, Mondorff and De- 
witt loom as four of the regulars but 
the fifth man and reserve strength 
present a tremendous problem. 

"Ship" has a winning average in 
basket-ball of more than 65 per cent 
but he'll be hard put to keep up to 
that ratio this season. 



Varsity Ring Card 

January 14 — Duke at Durham. 
*Jaunary 28— Catholic U. 

February 14 — Virginia at Charlottesville. 

February 11 — North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 
*February 18 — Rutgers. 

February 24 and 25 — Southern Conference tour- 
ney (place not yet selected). 

March 4 — Army. 



* Double-header with basket-ball. 



November, 1938 



Basket-ball Schedule 



December 3 — Penn State at State College 
(clinic game). 

December 13 — University of Richmond at Rich- 
mond. 

December 15 — Clemson. 

December 16 — Davidson. 

January 4 — Pennsylvania at Philadelphia. 

January 7 — Army at West Point. 

January 11 — Navy at Annapolis. 

January 13 — Duke. 

January 16 — V. M. I, at Lexington. 

January 17 — Washington and Lee at Lexing- 
ton. 

January 20 — North Carolina. 
'January 28 — Virginia. 

February 2 — Duke at Durham. 



February 3— 


North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 


February 4— 


North Carolina State at Raleigh 


February 8 — 


Georgetown. 


February 11 


-Washington and Lee. 


February 14- 


-William and Mary. 


February 15- 


—St. John's at Annapolis. 


* February 18- 


-V. M. I. 


February 20- 


—Catholic U. at Washington. 


February 22- 


—George Washington at Washing 


ton. 




February 24 


—Washington College. 


March 2. 3 


ind 4 — Southern Conference tour 


ney at Ra 


eigh. 



* Double-header with boxing. 



Freshmen Football Roster 



Name 


Pos. 


Ht. 


Wt. 


Age 


High School 


Home 


Richard Greer 


End 


6-1 


162 


20 


Valley Forge M. A. 


Washington, D. C. 


Charles Bowers 


End 


6-2 


202 


18 


Northside 


Corning, N. Y. 


Ashton Garrett 


End 


6-2 


183 


18 


Rich-Montgomery 


Rockville, Md. 


Robert Steele 


End 


6 


172 


18 


Collingdale & Perkiomen Collingdale, Pa. 


Harry Pappas 


End 


5-11% 


161 


17 


Poly 


Baltimore, Md. 


William Niedermair 


End 


5-7 


163 


20 


Woodrow Wilson 


Washington, D. C. 


Ralph Burlin 


Tackle 


6-1 


190 


20 


Tome 


Port Deposit, Md. 


Kenneth Longwill 


Tackle 


6 


197 


20 


Providence Day 


E. Prov., R. I. 


John Hepburn 


Tackle 


5-9 


201 


18 


Devitt 


Brentwood, Md. 


E. C. Atwater 


Tackle 


5-ny 2 


183 


17 


Tech 


Cheverly, Md. 


Theodore Vial 


Tackle 


6-i y 2 


172 


17 


Tech 


Riverdale, Md. 


Charles Pottorff 


Guard 


5-8 


184 


19 


Hagerstown 


Hagerstown, Md. 


Larry MacKenzie 


Guard 


6-1 


177 


18 


Forest Park 


Silver Spring, Md. 


William Jack 


Guard 


5-10 


175 


17 


Tome 


Port Deposit, Md. 


Edwin Bader 


Center 


5-10% 


174 


18 


Ogden 


Chevy Chase, Md. 


James Wharton 


Center 


6 


155 


20 


Forest Park 


Baltimore, Md. 


Jack Barrett 


Center 


6 


170 


18 


Salesianuim 


Wilmington, Del. 


Mearle DuVall 


Back 


5-10 


169 


18 


Mt. St. Joe 


Baltimore, Md. 


Donald Shockey 


Back 


6 


199 


20 


Waynesboro 


Waynesboro, Pa. 


John Williamson 


Back 


5-6 


155 


21 


Tech 


Hyattsville, Md. 


Bernard Ulman 


Back 


6-1 


165 


20 


Forest Park 


Baltimore, Md. 


Elmer Rigby 


Back 


5-11 


165 


20 


Forest Park 


Baltimore, Md. 


Edwin James 


Back 


6 


160 


22 


Balto. City Col. 


Baltimore, Md. 


Jack Warfield 


Back 


5-11 


155 


20 


Balto. City Col. 


Baltimore. Md. 


James Dunn 


Back 


5-10 


160 


17 


Staunton M. A. 


Washington, D. C 


John Cordyack 


Back 


6 


167 


20 


Osceola Mills 


Baltimore, Md. 


William Holbrook 


Back 
© 


5-10 


145 


17 


Tech 

• 


College Park, Md 


Big Meet 










Former "M" 


Club 


On March 


11 








President M 


arries 



Maryland and the Fifth Regiment 
have decided upon Saturday night, 
March 11 as the date for their annual 
big indoor track meet in the latter's 
huge armory in Baltimore. They are 
hopeful of matching last year's show 
which drew a capacity crowd. 

The date was shifted from the first 
to the second week in March on 
account of the West Point boxing 
team visiting College Park at the 
former time. 



Lewis W. (Knocky) Thomas, '28, 
former gridiron and cinder track star 
for the Old Liners, married Miss 
Louise Carol Meads of Washington on 
November 23, in Washington. 

Knocky, as his familiar associates 
call him, is a former "M" Club presi- 
dent, having held this position for two 
terms. He is a member of the Sigma 
Nu fraternity. Knocky now is associ- 
ated with the C & P Telephone Co. 
The newlyweds will reside in Washing- 
ton. 



Women's Groups Honor 
Margaret Brent 

In honor of the first woman district 
attorney in the United States, a patri- 
otic celebration marking the Margaret 
Brent Tercentenary, provided for in a 
proclamation issued by Governor Nice 
at the request of the Maryland Feder- 
ation of Women's Clubs, was held in 
the University Auditorium Nov. 22. 

The principal address was to be 
given by Brig. Gen. Frank T. Hines, 
administrator of veterans' affairs. Dr. 
H. C. Byrd and Mrs. Henry L. Naylor, 
president of the Prince George's Coun- 
ty Federation of Women's Clubs, were 
to deliver addresses of welcome. A syn- 
opsis of Margaret Brent's life was 
presented by Rudolph Allen who ar- 
ranged and presided over the patriotic 
program. 

The University band provided music 
for the occasion and Girl Scouts of the 
county gave a salute to the Flag. Offi- 
cials of the State and county federa- 
tions, together with those who ap- 
peared on the program, were guests at 
a luncheon given in honor of Brig. Gen. 
Hines preceding the exercises. 

1938 Enrollment 

From the total of 2,851 students 
matriculated at the University, 1,892 
are residents of the State, 654 hail 
from the District of Columbia and 314 
are from out of state. 

Baltimore City leads the State en- 
rollment with 485 students. Prince 
George's County follows with 402, 
while Montgomery County comes in 
third with 347. 

• 

Birth— Mr. and Mrs. John Ward 
Savage are the proud parents of a 
baby boy, John Ward, Jr., born on 
September 14, weighing 7% pounds. 
The Savage's are living in Atlanta, 
Georgia, where Jack is with the Fed- 
eral Bureau of Investigation. 

When the news reached this region 
it is hard to tell who was the happiest, 
the parents or Aunt Polly Snouffer, 
'30, and Uncle Nelson Snouffer, '26, 
who resides in Calvert Hills. 

Jack, '32, is a member of Sigma Nu 
and a former track star for the Old 
Liners. 

Mrs. Savage was formerly Miss 
Elizabeth Burriss. 
O 

Engaged — Miss Jacklyn Dotterer 
and John J. (Moe) Egan are engaged 
to be married. The time is expected 
to be next spring. 



10 



Maryland Alumni News 



Grapevine News About Those We Know 



Birth — This is a tardy announce- 
ment but for those who haven't heard, 
Mr. and Mrs. Loring Gingell, now res- 
idents of College Park, have a fine boy 
born last spring. He is called Robert 
Loring, a future halfback. Mrs. Gin- 
gell was formerly Betty Ehle. Loring 
will be remembered for his cheerlead- 
ing ability in his college days. 
O 

Real Estate — First assistant to Rob- 
ert M. Watkins, '23, president of the 
College Park Building Corporation, is 
Ellwood Nicholas, '28. Nick, as his 
associates call him, has charge of the 
sales, advertising and rentals for the 
corporation. This corporation has the 
picturesque Calvert Hills development 
just south of College Park which now 
has more than 100 homes. Nick lives 
in the community. He is a member of 
Phi Sigma Kappa, and got his M. A. 
degree from his Alma Mater in 1929. 
O 

Building and Loan — Out of the hills 
of Western Maryland came Ed Tenney, 
'28, former gridiron star for the Terps 
in former years. "Ed" went to China 
following graduation and was there 
for eight years. Now he is in Balti- 
more, as representative for the Druid 
Hill Federal Savings and Loan Associ- 
ation. Ed is a member of Kappa Alpha 
and the "M" Club. 
O 

Married — Ruth Kreiter, and Charley 
Berry, '34, were married on October 27, 
following which they took a honey- 
moom to Bermuda. Ruth is a member 
of Kappa Kappa Gamma and Charley 
a member of Delta Sigma Phi. The 
newlyweds are now residing in Ala- 
bama. 

O 

Married — Evelyn Brumbaugh, '35, 
and Frederick H. Green were married 
October 26 in Washington. Evelyn 
is a member of Alpha Omicron Pi, 
Mortar Board and won first honors in 
the College of Arts and Science. 



6 

Married — A member of the class of 
1937, waits for a lady in the class of '38, 
Dick Maurer, '37, and Dotty Hobbs, '38, 
were married on October 1st past. 
Dotty is a member of Alpha Omicron 
Pi, Mortar Board and several honorary 
groups. She was secretary-treasurer 
of Student Government Association, 
women's editor of the Terrapin. Dick 
is located in Philadelphia with the Bur- 
roughs Adding Machine Company. The 
newlyweds are residing in Philadel- 
phia. 

O 
Politics — Down on Eastern Sho', one 
of Maryland's prominent Alumni wins 
in the political fight the past fall. J. 
Ben Barnes, '23, has been elected Clerk 
of the Court, Somerset County, Mary- 
land. Ben has been assistant clerk for 
several years. He is a Sigma Nu and 
resides in Princess Anne, Maryland. 

O 
Married— A Tri Delt, Ruth Knight, 
'38, graduate of the College of Home 
Economics, married Milton Peper, '35, 
a member of Alpha Gamma Rho. They 
are living in Silver Spring, Md. 

O 
Married — Frances Kercher, '31, a 
member of Kappa Kappa Gamma and 
a former beauty queen runner up, mar- 
ried the prominent Coleman Headley, 
'38. Coleman now is teaching physical 
education and coaching at Bladensburg 
High School. The newlyweds are re- 
siding in Washington, D. C. 

O 
Birth — On November 16, Mr. and 
Mrs. N. Meyer Baker announced the 
arrival of Bette Lynn at the Garfield 
Hospital in Washington, D. C. Mrs. 
Baker was formerly Sarah Sugar, '33, 
who graduated with high honors in the 
College of Education. 

O 
General Motors — Elizabeth Taylor, 
'27, a member of Alpha Omicron Pi 
and Phi Kappa Phi, is with the Gen- 
eral Motors Corporation in Washing- 
ton, D. C. 



Dr.' Aycock, '24, 
Promoted 

Recent promotion in the staff of the 
University Hospital, Dr. Thomas B. 
Aycock, '24, M. D., former assistant 
professor of Surgery, now becomes 
Professor of Clinical Surgery to fill 
the vacancy caused by the death of Dr. 
Frank S. Lynn. Dr. Aycock has been 
a teacher of anatomy for some eight 
or ten years following graduation. He 
later became staff surgeon of the Uni- 
versity Hospital and the Baltimore 
City Hospitals. 

He is regarded by many in his pro- 
fession as among the most prominent 
doctors in surgery today. 

Dr. Aycock was born in North Caro- 
lina but he has become so imbued with 
the Maryland spirit that he is now an 
Old Liner through and through. 

He is very active in the Alumni af- 
fairs of the Medical School and was 
at one time secretary of the Medical 
Alumni Association. At present he is 
the representative of the General Al- 
umni Council for the University. 
• 

New York Alumni 
Group Hold Party 

All alumni in the Metropolitan area 
are cordially invited to attend the an- 
nual cocktail party of the New York 
Alumni Group, on Saturday, Decem- 
ber 3, from 4:30 o'clock on. As in the 
past, the party will be held in the 
Lounge Restaurant of the Waldorf 
Astoria Hotel. The Lounge Restau- 
rant is located on the north side of 
the main lobby of the Waldorf. 

There will be no cover or minimum 
charge; drinks will be ordered on an 
a la carte basis. There will be dancing. 

This party is always a means of re- 
newing old friendships among the al- 
umni. Alumni are urged to bring their 
wives, husbands, friends and sweet- 
hearts, or what have you. 

Jim Dinghman, Jim Knotts, Bill 
Maslin, and Ed Mullen are in charge 
of arrangements for the affair. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

CHARTER DAY CELEBRATION 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 20, 1939 



LORD BALTIMORE HOTEL 



» » 



BALTIMORE 



November, 1938 



11 



ENGINEERING FACULTY » » » 




Back row, (left to right) — Wikstorm, Hodgins, Hoshall, Ernst Allen, Ingalls, Huckert, Lindahl. 
Front row — Lowe, Pyle, Nesbit, Steinberg, Creese, Machwart. 






-I 



5?j 

sSL" 

a »., 






• The College of Engineering has advanced in 
recent years to a point of prominence among engi- 
neering schools. Directed by Dean S. S. Steinberg, 
there have been added to the College during the 
past two years twenty instructors, all of whom 
have advanced degrees together with wide practi- 
cal experience. With this added personnel, it has 
been possible to strengthen the courses in the three 



branches of engineering already established and 
add to the College the newly formed department 
of Chemical Engineering. Last fall the curricula 
in civil, electrical, and mechanical engineering 
were accredited by the Engineers' Council for 
Professional Development. This ranks the Col- 
lege of Engineering among the very best in the 
country. 




Electrical Engineering 




Civil E 



ngineermg 



MP 


2 >i 


Hl'^Sf /i^B 




i • K_ ^^f 


3Li. 



Mechanical Engineering 



r- _ 



ll 1 ' 



toihh 



do iT\ Gi^%m 



...a new pleasure 
in smoking 

You too will find more pleasure 
in Chesterfield's refreshing 
mildness and satisfying taste. 
That's why smokers every- 
where are now saying . . . 
"More pleasure than any 
cigarette I ever tried 



99 



y^m*,*. 



r- 



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MARYLAND 

ALUMNI 

NEWS 



J&$e> 



DECEMBER 
1938 




55 



rn 



as 



as 

(S3 



aan 



mi MittiM teri-t^vifrr'-tiltt 




Oldest 

Buildings on 

the Campus 




OLD MEDICAL BUILDING 

BALTIMORE 



ROSSBOURG INN 

COLLEGE PARK 



CHARTERED BY STATE LEGISLATURE 133 YEARS AGO 



The University of Maryland 
Celebrates Charter Day 



Friday, January 20, 1939, 7 P. M. 



Lord Baltimore Hotel 



Baltimore 



A time when Alumni, Faculty and Friends of the University join to cele- 
brate the founding of our great University. Banquet, short after-dinner 
program and entertainment, followed by dancing. Price, $2.50 per person. 
Make application with your Alumni office or write directly to Charter 
Day Committee, University of Maryland, Lombard and Greene Streets, 

Baltimore, Md. 



SPONSORED BY THE ALUMNI AND AFFILIATED 
ORGANIZATIONS OF THE UNIVERSITY 



Volume X 



MARYLAND ALUMNI NEWS, DECEMBER. 



Number 7 



Alumni Association- University of Maryland 

Founded in 1892 



■over 



Pictu 



re 



OFFICERS FOR 1938 - 39 

C. Walter Cole, '21, President 
Tovvson, Md. 
Charles W. Sylvester, '08, Vice-President 
G. F. Pollock, '23, Secretary-Treasurer 



Baltimore, Md. 
College Park, Md. 



ALUMNI BOARD 
(Note — The officers named above are also members of the Alumni Board) 

Reuben Brigham, '08 Arts and Sciences 

Charles V. Koons, '29 Engineering 

P. W. Chichester, '20 Education 

John A. Silkman, '35 Agriculture 

Ruth Miles, '31 Home Economics 

MEMBERS AT LARGE 

Esther Hughes Lee, '33 Women's Representative 

J. Donald Kieffer, '30 Men's Representative 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Editor 

Maryland Alumni News, issued monthly by the University of Maryland Alumni Associa- 
tion at College Park, Md., as second-class matter under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Annual Alumni Association dues are $2.00. One year's subscription to Alumni News, 
50 cents. 

GROUP LEADERS 

Allegany County: E. Brooke Whiting, '98, President; Dr. Joseph Franklin, '21, Secretary, 

Cumberland, Md. 
Baltimore County: C. Walter Cole, '21, President; H. B. Derrick, '17, Secretary, Towson, M<1. 
Baltimore City: Chester Tawney, '31, President, 4022 Roland Avenue; E. Gordon Ham- 
mond, '34, Secretary, 1023 W. Barre Street, Baltimore, Md. 
Caroline County: George W. Clendaniel, '20, President, Denton, Md.: Dr. Maurice A. Brackett, 

'21, Treasurer, Denton, Md.: Mrs. George W. Clendaniel, '21, Secretary, Denton, Md. 
Harford County: W. B. Munnikhuysen, '14, President; H. M. Carroll, '20, Secretary, Bel 

Air, Md. 
Frederick County: J. Homer Remsberg, '18, President; Henry R. Shoemaker, '17, Secretary, 

Frederick, Md. 
Montgomery County: Lawrence G. Smoot, '18, President, Kensington, Md.; Mary Fisher, '36, 

Secretary, Rockville, Md. 
New York City: Donald Kieffer, '30, President, 195 Broadwav; Sarah Morris, '25, Secretarv, 

140 E. 63rd Street, New York City. 
Philadelphia: A. Moulton McNutt, '06, President, 413 Cooper Street, Camden, N. J.: J. P. 

Mudd, '07, Secretary, 174 Manheim Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Pittsburgh: E. Minor Wenner, '27, President, 1111 Gladys Avenue; Dr. A. A. Krieger, '32, 

Secretary Highland Building. Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Washington, D. C: J. Douglas Wallop, '1°, President, 6139 N. Dakota Avenue, N.W.; 

Charles V. Koons, '29, Secretary, 419 Fourth Street, N.E., Washington. 
Washington County: Hon. Henry Holzapfel, Jr., '93, President, Hagerstown, Md.: L. G. 

Mathias, '23, Secretary, Hagerstown, Md. 

"M" CLUB OFFICERS AND BOARD MEMBERS 



Donald H. Adams, '28 President 

A. K. Besley, '23 Vice-President 



Dr. E. N. Cory, '09 Secretary-Treas. 

W. B. Maslin, '09 Historian 



REPRESENTATIVES 



G. F. Pollock, '2i Baseball 

H. B. Shipley, ' 1 4 Basketball 

Stewart McCaw, '35 Boxing 

James Stevens, '19 Lacrosse 

Lewis W. Thomas, '28 Track 



James Blsick, '35 Tennis 

Charles Remsbi rg, '26 Cross Country 

W. C. Supplee, '26 Football 

Dr. E. B. Friedenwald, '03 
Dr. A. W. Valentine, '04 



At Large 



The most appropriate picture at night 
is the Library- where much reference study 
is done. The Library- is probably used more 
in the evening than any other time of the 
day. A Reference Librarian is constantly on 
hand for the aid of students. More than 
50,000 books are housed here. Some Alum- 
ni have contributed to the Library- collec- 
tion; also several graduating classes. 



Fellow Alumni 

We are nearing the beginning of 
a new year. Many of our mistakes are 
to be forgotten but we look forward 
to another year with new resolutions. 
For my fellow Alumni I suggest the 
folowing: "During the new vear I 
will become a more active member 
in the Alumni Association." 

Elsewhere in this publication you 
have noticed the announcement of 
the Charter Dav Celebration of the 
beginning of our great University. 
This will be January 20, 1939, in 
Baltimore. It is an occasion when 
Alumni, faculty, and friends of the 
University join in the one common 
unified purpose, a greater Universitv 
of Maryland. 

I personally attended the Celebra- 
tion last vear and can truthfully sav 
I never attended a more enjoyable 
function. I saw many faculty mem- 
bers and fellow alumni and had 
friendly conversations. 

A good resolution suggestion is: 
"I will begin the new year by first 
attending the Charter Day Celebra- 
tion and all other Alumni functions 
during the ensuing year. 

My best wishes to all. 

Sinccrclv yours, 

C. Walter Cole, '21, 

President. 



Maryland Alumni News 



Charter Day Celebration, January 20th 



ANNUALLY the Alumni, faculty, and 
friends of our Alma Mater assemble on 
January 20 to commemorate the beginning 
of our great University with a banquet at 
the Lord Baltimore Hotel in Baltimore. A 
most interesting program has been ar- 
ranged bv the committee which, in addi- 
tion to the banquet, will have a brief after- 
dinner program with special entertainment, 
to be followed by dancing. The well-known 
Townsmen Orchestra of Baltimore will fur- 
nish music for the evening. 

Our eminent alumnus, the Hon. Wil- 
liam P. Cole, '10, will serve as toastmaster, 
and a nationally-known speaker will de- 
liver the address. 

The faculty are usually present in great 
numbers which will give every alumnus a 
splendid opportunity to meet and chat with 
them. The Baltimore Sun very appropri- 
ately called the celebration following the 
dinner program last year an "Old Pal 
Partv." Several classes had reunions at this 
time. 

Those desiring reservations are requested 
to write the Alumni office as far in ad- 
vance as possible. There are eight places to 
a table, and should you desire to make up 
a partv for one table, please make your 
reservations together. 

There has been arranged some pre-ban- 
quet broadcasts in an endeavor to bring to 
the Alumni and people of the state some 
interesting historical notes on the beginning 
of the various units in the University as 
well as something about those men who 
were active in its early development. Tune 
in on Station WCAO, Baltimore, about 
5.30 to 5.45 on Friday, December 30th, 
Tuesdays, January 3rd, 10th and 17th. 
Then attend the banquet on January 20th 
to celebrate what they did for us. Those 
serving on the committee of arrangements 
are as follows: 

COMMITTEEMEN FOR THE 
CHARTER DAY BANQUET 
JANUARY 20, 1939 
Honorary Chairman, Col. Frank R. 
Weed, '03; M.D. 

Chairman, Frank Black, '04, Phar.D.; 
Vice-Chairman, Mrs. Page Edmunds, '05, 
R.N. 

Presidents of the Alumni Associations — 
Co Chairmen 

Dr. Charles F. Blake, '93, Medical 

Dr. Arthur I. Bell, '19, Dental 

Miss Bessie L. Maston, '20, Nursing 

John E. Magers, Esq., '14, Law 

Dr. David B. Getz, '13, Pharmacy 

C. Walter Cole, Esq., '21, College Park 

Mr. Donald H. Adams, '28, "M" Club. 



Dinner Committee 

Chairman, W. Buckev Clemson, '21, 
D.D.S.; Leo C. Rettaliata. '18, Ph.C; C. 
Reid Edwards. '13, M.D.; Miss Vesta 
Swarts, '29, R.N.; Eldridge Young, '07, 
LL.B.; Miss Elizabeth Bonthron, '33, B.S.; 
Lee Wright, T.A.M.P.A.; Miss Miriam 
Connolly, Dietician. 

Invitation Committee 

Chairman, John F. Wannewetsch, '13, 
Phar.D.; Leonard I. Davis, '21, D.D.S.; 
Kenneth Boyd, '24, M.D.; Paul Mason, '15, 
LL.B.; Miss Frances Meredith, '10, R.N.; 
Miss Ruth Miles, '31. B.S.; B. Olive Cole. 
'13, Phar.D. 

Program and Entertainment Committee 
Chairman, T. B. Aycock, '24, M.D.; 
Vice-Chairman, Mrs. Blanche Horine, '21, 
R.N.; L. Wethered Barroll, '12, LL.B.; Paul 
Deems, '29, D.D.S.; A. C. Diggs, '21, A.B.; 
T. Ellsworth Ragland. '14. Ph.C; Mrs. 
Edith Burnside Whiteford, '29, B.S. 

Publicity Committee 

Chairman, Daniel Sullivan, '07, LL.B.; 
Douglas Browning, '34, D.D.S.; Charles 
Maxson, '10, M.D.; Miss Alice Elchenko, 
'34, R.N.; Hyman Davidov, '20, Ph.C; 
George O. Weber, '33, B.S.; Wm. C 
Needham, '33, B.S.; J. Marshal Mathias, 
'35, B.S.; Carl Hummelsine, '37, B.S. 

Ticket Committee 

Chairman, W. M. Hillegeist, '12, B.S.; 
Vice-Chairman, Daniel E. Shehan, '22, 
D.D.S.; Miss Ann Scout, '18, R.N.; 
Charles Moylan, '24, LL.B.; Wendell Al- 
len, '16, LL.B.; George Blome, '14, LL.B.; 
W. H. Baish, '09. D.D.S.; A. L. Daven- 
port, '10, D.D.S.; Gordon Pugh, '37, 
D.D.S.; F. W. Gillis. '27, M.D.; Marvin 
J. Andrews, '21, M.S.; Charles S. Austin, 
'16, Ph.C; G. F. Pollock, '23, B.S.; John 
Silkman, '35, B.S.; C. V. Koons, '29, B.S. 

Reception Committee 

Chairman. Howard Sweeten, '19, LL.B.; 
Lucian Brun, '05, D.D.S.; Mrs. Charles 
Reifschneider, '20, R.N.; Robert L. Swain, 
'09, Phar.D.; Robert P. Bay, '05, M.D.; 
Charles W. Sylvester, '08, B.S.; Mrs. Mary 
Schaffer, '24, R.N.; Mrs. Wilhelmina 
McCann, '23, R.N.; Mrs. Harry Stein, '17, 
R.N.; Mrs. John Paul Trov,' '17, R.N.; 
Frank M. Budacz, '28, Ph.C; John A. 
Strevig, '12, Ph.C; Harry S. Harrison, '12, 
Ph.C; Albert Leatherman, '20, Ph.C; Si- 



mon Solomon, '18, Ph.C; Medford C. 
Wood, '27, Ph.C; Thomas K. Galvin, '15, 
M.D.; A. E. Goldstein, '32, M.D.; Carroll 
Lochard, '03, M.D.; Edgar Friedenwald, 
'29, M.D.; Dr. John T. O'Mara, '03, M.D.; 
Arthur M. Shipley, '02, M.D.; Frank J. 
Kirby, '92, M.D.; Herbert Blake, '05, M.D.; 
George McLean, '16, M.D.; Wetherbee 
Fort, '19, M.D.; Cyrus Horine, '19, M.D.; 
Wm. L. Cabin. '16, LL.B.; John L. Lee, 
'94, LL.B.; Walter L. Clark, '02, LL.B.; 
Allan Cleveland, LL.B.; Harold Tschu- 
di, '14, LL.B.; Judge William H. Lawrence, 
'95, LL.B.; Frank A. Bomberger, '94, B.S.; 
Ingham Oswald, '08, B.S. 

Reginald Truitt, '14, B.S.; Ernest Cory, 
'09, B.S.; Hanson Mitchell, '98, C.E.; Mil- 
dred Kettler, '31, B.S.; Miss Mary Crisp, 
'37, B.S.; Omar Crothers, '29, B.S.; Mrs. 
Sannv Hardimann Williams, '33, B.S.; A. 
Dixon Garey, '11; Wiley Smith, '00, 
D.D.S.; Alex Paterson, '11, D.D.S.; Law- 
rence Bimesteffer, '34, D.D.S.; Lynn Em- 
mart, '22, D.D.S.; H. L. Hurst, '19, D.D.S.; 
H. W. Jacobs, '19, D.D.S.; John Manley, 
'19, D.D.S.; DeWitt B. Lancaster, '17, 
D.D.S.; Morris Cramer, '17, D.D.S.; How- 
ard VanAtta, '14, D.D.S.; Glen Carter, '23, 
D.D.S.; Elmer Cory, '28, D.D.S.; Max 
Baklor, '16, D.D.S. 

County Chairmen 
Allegany, F. Brooke Whiting, '93, LL.B.; 
Anne Arundel, J. O. Purvis, '04, M.D.; 
Baltimore, C Walter Cole, '21, A.B.; Bal- 
timore City, Chester W. Tawney, '31, A.B.; 
Calvert, Page C Jett, '31, M.D.; Caroline, 
J. O. Knotts, '14. LL.B.; Carroll, Thomas 
H. Legg, '07, M.D.; Cecil, Harry Cantwell, 
'06, M.D.; Charles, H. M. Coster, '09, B.S.; 
Dorchester, Calvin Harrington, '34, LL.B.; 
Frederick, P. W. Chichester, '20, B.S.; 
Garrett, W. W. Grant, '09, D.D.S.; Har- 
ford, James S. Hopkins, '05, D.D.S. ; How- 
ard, James Clark, '07, LL.B.; Kent, F. B. 
Hines, '00, M.D.; Montgomery, Lawrence 
R. Smoot, '18, B.S.; Prince George's, Jas. 
C. Sasscer, '34, M.D.; Queen Anne's, A. 
Sydney Gadd, Jr., '24, A.C.; St. Mary's, 
L. B. Johnson, '88, M.D.; Somerset, George 
C. Coulbourne, '10, M.D.; Talbot, Leon- 
ard V. Johnson, '04. Ph.C; Washington, 
L. C Mathias, '23, A.B.; Wicomico, A. 
E. Williams, '16, LL.B.; Worcester, A. 
A. Parker, '04, M.D. 

Out-of-State Chairmen 

New York, J. Don Kieffer, '30, A.B.: 
Philadelphia, A. Moulton McNutt, '06 : 
B.S.; Pittsburgh, E. Minor Wenner, '27, 
B.S.; Washington, D. C, Douglas Wallop ; 
'19, B.S. 



December, 1938 



Sturgis and Dubel 
Become Marine Colonels 

RECENTLY promotions in the U. S. 
Marine Corps involved two members 
of the Old Line Class of 1917. Bernard 
Dubcl and Galen M. Sturgis were raised 
in rank from major to that of lieutenant- 
colonel. Roth were Marines during the 
\\ orld War. Colonel Sturgis was in the 
Philippines when the China Clipper made 
its first flight to America, upon which he 
sent a letter to his mother in Hvattsvillc. 
Colonel Dubel has been in the Virgin Is 
lands and Nicaragua and many other for- 
eign ports. While in Nicaragua he mar- 
ried Miss R. Ginn of Iowa. The Dubels 
have a nine-year-old daughter. He is also 
a graduate of the Army Signal School. Col- 
onel Sturgis is stationed in Philadelphia 
and Colonel Dubel is at Ouantico, Va. 

• 

Former Gridiron Men 
Attend Football Banquet 

Among the old timers were C. T. Bailev, 
'22, Captain, U. S. M. C, a star center 
in his college days; Joe Berger, '25, Cap- 
tain, U. S. M. C, one of Maryland's most 
stellar tackles; Lewis W. "Knocky" Thom- 
as, '28, former halfback; Kirk Besley, '24, 
former quarterback; Don Adams, '28, 
among the immortals at tackle; George 
Madigan, '31, a center of prominence; 
Johnnv Mitchell, '33, a star utility man; 
Buddy Yeager, '37, a backfield mainstay of 
creditable performance; Al Woods, '33, 
among the immortal blocking backs; Toddv 
Riggs, '20, the other end of a great pair, 
his cohort was Geary Eppley; Julie Radice, 
'30, a standout as a backer-up; Burton Ship- 
ley, '14. the local boy who was a shining 
star at signal calling; Charles Leroy Mack- 
ert. '21, a two-position star, first at tackle 
then at fullback and sometimes it seemed 
like he was doing both at the same time; 
Bill Kemp, 12, an end who became a great 
fullback in one week; Zeke Supplee, '26, a 
towering end with All-American honorable 
mention; Sy Symons, '02, a player among 
the pioneers of the collegiate games. 




Dr. Andrew 



DuMez 



American Pharmacists 
Elect DuMez 

Dr. Andrew J. DuMez, Dean of the 
School of Pharmacy, was recently elected 
president of the American Pharmaceutical 
Association. His tenure of office will be 
for the year 1939-40, which begins in Au- 
gust. Dean DuMez is a widelv known man 
in the pharmacy profession. He came to the 
University as head of the Pharmacy School 
in 1926 with much experience as a very 
competent and efficient administrator in 
pharmacv. He is a graduate of pharmacy 
from the Univcrsitv of Wisconsin. Has 
spent four vears in the Philippines, where 
he organized a school of pharmacy, and 
has taught at the Oklahoma A. and M. 
College. For eight vears prior to his asso- 
ciation with the Universitv he was in the 
United States Public Health Service. His 
attainments in the field of pharmacy have 
won for him a place among the American 
Men of Science, also membership in several 
honorarv fraternal orders. Dr. DuMez is 
an ardent Old Line fan. He takes an active 
interest in Alumni affairs and is frequently 
in the rooting section of athletic contests. 

Congratulations and best wishes to you, 
Dean, for a most successful tenure of office. 



Old Line Spirit 



Here's one for Old Liners to applaud 
and then follow suit. A letter came into the 
Alumni office recently with a check en- 
closed, saving, "Here are my dues. It seems 
to me I have neglected this for several 
years and as today is my birthday I take 
great pleasure in observing it by making a 



contribution to my Alma Mater. While I 
did not graduate, I did spend the happiest 
days of my life on the campus at College 
Park. I wish to contribute something to- 
ward perpetuating that memory." 

This was received from A. Dixon Garev 
of Baltimore, an ardent supporter and 
loval alumnus. Follow suit, fellow Alumni. 



Engineers of '33 
Have Reunion 

The Civil Engineers of '33 have held 
their annual fall dinner and bull session, 
writes Howard M. Biggs, generalissimo of 
the order. A vear ago these Engineers de- 
cided to meet November 19, 193S, and 
they did as per schedule, with nine being 
present. Now they have scheduled a spring 
meeting and want all the C E.'s of '33 t.) 
be on hand about April 1, 1939. Further 
details to follow. 

I Ioward, an employee of the Spidel Con- 
crete Construction Company of Washing- 
ton, got some interesting information from 
his fellow classmates in the session. 

Samuel McGlathery, Jr., a single man 
(girls) has been with the Greenbelt Con- 
struction Project for the past three years. 

Robert E. Dunning married Elizabeth 
Kiser. Has one son, three and one-half 
years old. Named William E. Mr. Dunning 
is employed in the United States National 
Park Service. 

Lend G. Phillips is with the C C. C. 
project at the National Agricultural Re- 
search Center at Beltsville. 

William P. Starr is with the Public Util 
ities Commission of the District of Co- 
lumbia. 

Harold B. Norwood married Mildred 
Ilobbs of Laurel. Has one son, Jon Earl, 
four years old. Harold is an engineer in the 
office of the Quartermaster General in the 
War Department. He resides near Laurel. 

Norman Belt, single, resides in Hyatts- 
ville and is a computor for the Washing- 
ton Suburban Sanitary Commission. 

Walter F. Burdick is married to Miss 
Ariel E. Farley of Washington. They have 
two sons, George E. anc Walter F., Jr. Bur- 
dick is an inspector with the Public Utili- 
ties Commission of the District of Colum- 
bia. 

Stanley D. Shinn, of Riverdale, is em- 
ployed by the county survevor of Prince 
George's Countv . 

News About Others 

The following information came forth 
about those not present: 

Charles E. Kitchin is with the Farm Se- 
curity Administration as assistant engineer. 
He is stationed in Amarillo, Texas. Not 
married and lives at the Palo Dure Apart- 
ments. 

Edward S. Holland is with the A. A. A. 
of the U. S. Department of Agriculture, 
married and has one youngster. 

(Continued on Page ]0) 



Maryland Alumni News 




NEW DINING HALL 




WORK lias been started here at Col- 
lege Park on what is perhaps the 
greatest job of facelifting in the history of 
any State University in the country. 

From morning to night architects, con- 
tractors, and workmen are busy applying 
a $2,500,000 beauty treatment to the Col- 
lege Park, Baltimore, and Princess Anne 
campuses, turning them into up-to-the- 
minute educational plants. 

To give an accurate verbal picture of all 
this to vou Alumni would be nearlv im- 
possible, but in attempting to show what 
is to be, a word tour of the College Park 
campus as of January 6, 1940, is in order. 

January 6, 1940 — Alumni Tour of Cam- 
pus. Starts at Main Gate. Location — just be- 
low Zalcsak's Grill for you younger Alumni, 
and across from what used to be Charley 
White's establishment for vou old timers. 

We enter and pass the Gym-Armorv, and 
to the right, facing the Agriculture Build- 
ing, we notice a new dormitory group ca- 
pable of housing over 200 men. 

Continuing, we go by Sylvester and Cal- 
vert Halls, and travel up the well-known 
path to the Dining Hall. Here we see 
double — no, not double — just an addition 
to the old Dining Hall, making it over 



twice as large, capable of seating over 1 ,000 
students at a time. (See picture above.) 

Walking toward Morrill Hall we glance 
over toward the Coed Field House and 
notice immediately a new structure back 
where the old Infirmary used to be. Wrong 
again, that's the newly renovated and en- 
larged Infirmary Building. 

Going down the walk toward Margaret 
Brent Hall (you fellows should know the 
way ) we cross University Lane, or the 
Back Road (for the benefit of Daydodger 
Alumni) and turn to the right, down the 
lane, and find that we are back of the Engi- 
neering Building, or are we, as the rear looks 
like the front and the front looks like the 
rear. But don't get alarmed the building 
hasn't been turned around; it's just another 
addition making the Engineering Building 
face toward Baltimore as well as Washing- 
ton. 

Gazing to the left — gosh! — not one, but 
two new buildings with one of them on the 
location of the Horticulture Building. 
Fooled again. That is the Horticulture 
Building with a few columns added so that 
it will blend in with the Georgian-Colonial 
architectural beauty of the rest of the cam- 
pus. However, that building right next to 
the Horticulture Building is the new Poul- 



try Building, one of the finest of its type 
in the country. 

Several hundred feet on down the lane 
on the same side as the Engineering Build- 
ing, we stop in front of another one of 
those turned around buildings. Nope it 
isn't the Chemistry Building doing a right- 
about face, but a brand new Home Eco- 
nomics Building attached to the rear of 
Chemistrv. 

Say, what is that out in the center of 
this new campus, to the rear of the present 
Dairy Building and facing the new Coed 
Dormitory? That, Mr. Alumni, is the new 
Administration Building, eventually to be 
the front of a huge Auditorium. 

Now down to the boulevard, where we 
find the old Rossbourg Inn,* restored to the 
year 1798, catering to tired, weary Alumni 
rather than to travelers on the old Washing- 
ton-Baltimore, and New York Post Road. 

From out the front window of the parlor 
of the Inn, we can see diagonally across to 
the General Service Buildings — built so as 
to shield the Power Plant, and its coal 
piles from persons passing bv on the boule- 
vard. 

Well, that's the end of the tour, and 
The Alumni News hopes vou didn't get 
too mixed up. Come down and we will 
show you around the campus personally 
. . . It's much easier that way. 



* Restored Rossbourg is to be used for a 
Faculty-Alumni Club. 



December, 1938 




M" CLUB OFFICERS FOR 1938-39 



H. B. Shipley, 14 Basketball 

Dr. E. N. Cory, *09 Secretary- Treasurer 

Lewis W. Thomas, '28 Track 

W. R. Maslin, '09 



James W. Stevens, '19 Lacrosse 

A. K. Besley, '23 Vice-President 

W. C. Supplee, '26 Football 

Historian 



Maryland Grad Creates Sissy Bull 

In Story For Walt Disney Feature 



bv Sugar Langfor», Diamondback Staff 



DO vou know that Ferdinand, the 
flower-smelling bull of Spain, now a 
current attraction at the RKO-Keith's thea- 
ter in Washington, is a product of the 
University? 

Munro Leaf, a Maryland alumnus, class 
of '27, created the languid, lazv bull in 
"The Story of Ferdinand." This book, 
which has been one of the year's best sell- 
ers, was penned by Leaf in less than forty 
minutes one rainy Sunday afternoon. 

Although the tale of the sissy bull was 
originally written for children's entertain- 
ment, rumors have it that the production 
is a satire on the existing political situation 
in Europe. The audience, which watched 
the antics of the peace-loving bull in a 
Washington theater, while laughing up- 
roariously, kept their tongues in their 
cheeks as they compared Ferdinand and 
his companions to our European neigh- 
bors. 

Leaf's unique publication has been made 
into a Walt Disney short, which has re- 
ceived nation-wide acclaim. Ferdinand, who 
prefers to sit "just quietly" under the cork 



tree and smell the pretty flowers, is prob- 
ably the most highly publicized animal in 
America. 

The individualistic author has not con- 
fined his writing to Ferdinand, but has 
composed other children's publications 
such as "Manners Can Be Fun," "Robert 
Francis Weatherbee," "Grammar Can Be 
Fun," and "Noodle." 

Fruit Judging Team Wins 

The University of Maryland Fruit Judg- 
ing Team won the silver cup and high indi- 
vidual gold medal after weeks of training 
for the Annual Eastern States Fruit Judg- 
ing Contest held at the University of West 
Virginia at Morgan town, December 10th. 

Frank McFarland, Julian Crane, and 
George Davis made up the three-man team 
for Maryland, coached bv Professors Spen- 
cer Chase, '34, and hying C. Haut of the 
Horticulture Department. Frank McFar- 
land, senior in Agricultural Education and 
son of a fruit grower, Frank McFarland, 
Senior, near Cumberland, won the gold 



Impromptu Gathering 

Prior to the Thanksgiving Day game in 
Baltimore several old grads gathered at the 
home of C. Walter Cole, '21, in Towson, 
Md. The weather outside was a disagreeable 
winter day but the Old Line spirit, with 
Hap Carrol, Jenks Brown, Russ Allen, Sid 
Gadd, Hobby Derrick, Geary Eppley, and 
"Rosey" Pollock, was up to top form. Many 
an old time was rehashed and several un- 
solved mysteries of school days were sup- 
posedly cleared up at last. 

In due course of time, "King" Cole, the 
merry old soul, led in the turkey and all its 
trimmings for the hungry ones. Having sat- 
isfied their thirst and hunger the troop 
inarched to the Baltimore Stadium and 
watched the Old Line gridiron boys con- 
quer the Generals of Washington and Lee 
in admirable fashion, finishing the season in 
a blaze of glory. 

Yes indeed, their wises were present, 
but off in another huddle, as they did not 
know the signals of this clan. All were very 
charming and holding their youth much 
better than their Old Line hubbies. 



medal for the highest individual score, and 
other members of the team finished high to 
win the cup. 



Maryland Alumni New:! I 



Old Line Athletic Contributions 



By W. H. ("Bill") HOTTEL: 




Maryland gridders, who will he lost for next season, receiving 
gold awards tor tluee years' service at annual banquet. Left to 
right, thev are: Nick Budkoft, end: George Kneplev, manager: 



Rip Hewitt, back; Jack Faber, assistant coach, who made the 
presentations; Jim Forrester, center; Charlie Weidinger, quar- 
terback; Jim A /cade, back, and John DeArmev, guard. 



23 Get "M" As Grid 
Squad Is Feted 

WITH Prof. Charles S. Richardson 
as toastmaster, Dr. H. C. Byrd, pres- 
ident of the University, and Henrv Holz- 
apfel, member of the Board of Regents, as 
the leading speakers. Maryland honored its 
football team at a banquet at Beaver Dam 
Country Club on December 12. 

Letters for work during the 1938 cam- 
paign went to 23, and 19 of them are due 
to be back for the 1939 season. 

Those to get "M's" were 

Ends — Frank Dvvyer, Frank Blazek, 
Francis Beamer and Leo Mueller. 

Tackles — Ralph Albarano, Bob Brown, 
Bill Krouse and Bob Cochrane. 

Guards — George Lawrence, John De- 
Armev, Ed Lloyd and Elmer Bright. 

Centers — Bob Smith and Jim Forrester. 



Backs — Charlie \\ cidingcr, Frank Skot- 
nicki, John Bovda, Joe Murphv, Fred Hew- 
itt. Bob Brand. Dick Shaffer. Fred W'ide- 
ner and Joe Devlin. 

Manager — George Kncplcv. 

Gold awards for three years of service 
went to Wcidinger, Forrester, DeArmev. 
Hewitt, Jim Meade and Nick Budkoff. 

Paid Annual Tribute 
The Terps received one of the finest tes- 
timonials ever accorded a Maryland team 
when about 200 faculty members, alumni 
and athletic officials from neighboring 
schools turned out to the dinner. This was 
almost twice the number that feted the 
winning team of last vear. 

Head Coach Frank Dobson said in pre- 
senting the letters that if such a crowd 
turned out at the end of a season when the 
team won only two games, he wondered 
where a banquet hall could be found large 



Letters Are Given 
To Six Harriers 

Cross country team letter winners shared 
in the football banquet this year when 
half a dozen of the runners and Manager 
W. I. Miller received their insignia at the 
grid fete. 

Led by Jim Kehoe, the harriers had a 
good season, beating Virginia, running sec- 
ond in the Southern Conference title meet 
and losing to North Carolina and Navy in 
close, interesting meets. 

Those in addition to Kehoe to get the 
"M" were Joe Peaslee, Tom Fields, Rob- 
ert Condon, Rov Skipton and Hermie 
Evans. 

enough to hold the crowd if it were to lose 

every game. However, the coach quickly 

allayed any fears that such a season might 

(Continued on Page 11) 



December, 1938 



Maryland's Varsity Basket Ball Squad 

Head Coach — Burton Shipley (serving his sixteenth year). 
Assistant — John (Jack) Faber 



Name 


Pos. 


Ht. 


Wt. 


Class 


High School 


Home 


•Adam Bengoechea 


F. 


5-8 


152 


Jr. 


Ogden 


Chevy Chase. Md. 


George DeWitt 


F. 


6-3 


158 


Soph. 


Western 


Washington, D. C 


♦Bill Rea 


F. 


6-1 


161 


Jr. 


Tech 


Washington, D. C 


xBill Bryant 


G. 


6 


170 


Sr. 


Central 


Washington. D. C 


•Eddie Johnson 


C. 


6-1 


165 


Sr. 


Bethesda C. C. 


Germantown, Md. 


•Francis Beamer 


C.-F. 


6-2 ' 2 


183 


Jr. 


Roosevelt 


Washington, D. C 


•George Knepley 


G. 


5-11 


164 


Sr. 


Altoona 


Altoona, Pa. 


♦Pershing Mondorff 


G. 


5-11 


198 


Jr. 


Emmitsburg 


Emmitsburg. Md. 


Dick Shaffer 


C. 


6-3 


175 


Soph. 


Ferndale 


Denton. Md. 


Gene Ochsenreiter 


F.-G. 


6 


163 


Soph. 


Rockville 


Rockville, Md. 


Frank Dwyer 


F. 


6-2 


174 


Soph. 


Forest Park 


Baltimore, Md. 


Arthur Rudy 


G. 


6 


197 


Jr. 


Middletown 


Middletown, Md. 



* 1937 - 1938 Letter Men. 

x Won letter in 1936 - 1937. but not out last season. 

Usual starting line-up: Bengoechea and DeWitt, forwards; Johnson, center; Knepley 
and Mondorff, guards. 

Lost by graduation: Waverly Wheeler, ace forward; Coleman Headley, clever guard, 
and John McCarthy, forward or center. Charlie Norton, exceptional soph center, left 
school. Milton Mulitz, dependable senior guard, is giving all his time to his studies 
this semester but may rejoin the squad at mid-term. 

(Story next page) 



Maryland's 1939 Varsity Boxing Squad 

Head Coach — Lieut. Col. Harvey L. "Heinie" Miller (Marine Corps Reserve) 

Associate Coach ■ — Capt. William A. Maglin (U. S. A.). 

Assistant Coach — Stewart McCaw. 



Name Wt. 

John Harn 120 

♦George Dorr 120 

Martin Rochlin 120-127 

Charles Dorr 127 

•Robert Bradley 

Philip Burkom 

Rowan Scarborough 
♦Benny Alperstein 

Kenneth Evans 
♦Nathan Askin 
•Jose de Peralta 

Hugh Jones 

Robert Miller 

Leonard Shields 

Frank Cronin 

Rodney Senseman 

Raymond Scoville 

Milton Lumsden 

George Acree 

'Newton Cox 

Robert Lodge 

Emery Sedlak 

Morton Steinbach 

Israel Leites 

Junious Hutton 

Samuel Jacques (200) Heavy 

Herman Raisin (196) Heavy 

Abe Cohen (195) Heavy 



127 
127 
127 
135 
135 
145 
145 
145 
145 
145 
155 
155 
155 
155-165 
155-165 
165 
165 
175 
175 
175 
175 



Ht. 
5-7V2 

5-7V2 

5-4 

5-4 

5-7V2 

5-8 

5-7 ' 2 

5-71 2 

5-101/2 

5-10> 2 

5-10 V2 

5-10 

5-10 

5-8 1/2 

5-11 

5-10 

5-11 

5-9 

6 

6 

5-11 

6-1 

6-2 

5-11 

6-2 

6 

6 

6 



Age 
19 
21 
22 
19 
21 
18 
20 
23 
20 
20 
21 
19 
18 
21 
21 
20 
20 
19 
19 
19 
20 
20 
20 
20 
22 
21 
21 
19 



Class 

Soph. 

Sr. 

Sr. 

Soph. 

Sr. 

Soph. 

Soph. 

Sr. 

Soph. 

Jr. 

Sr. 

Soph. 

Soph. 

Soph. 

Sr. 

Soph. 

Soph. 

Soph. 

Jr. 

Jr. 

Jr. 

Soph. 

Jr. 

Jr. 

Soph. 

Soph. 

Sr. 

Soph. 



High School 
Balto. City Col. 
Western 
Balto. City Col. 
Woodrow Wilson 
Hyattsville 
Balto. City Col. 
Montg. -Blair 
Balto. City Col. 
Central 

Balto. City Col. 
Candler 
Jarrettsville 
Hyattsville 
Atlantic City 
Bel Air 
Central 
Montg. -Blair 
Balto. Poly 
Central 
Forest Park 
Forest Park 
Homestead 
Balto. Poly 
Balto. City Col. 
Bethesda C. C. 
Hagerstown 
Erasmus Hall 
Eastern 



Home 
Baltimore. Md. 
Washington. D. C. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Washington, DC. 
Hyattsville. Md. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Silver Spring. Md. 
Baltimore. Md. 
Washington, D. C. 
Baltimore. Md. 
Havana. Cuba 
Jarrettsville, Md. 
Hyattsville, Md. 
Atlantic City, N. J. 
Bel Air, Md. 
Washington, D. C. 
Silver Spring. Md. 
Baltimore. Md. 
Washington, D. C. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Homestead, Pa. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Bethesda. Md. 
Smithsburg. Md. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Washington, D. C. 



1938 Letter Men. 



1939 SCHEDULE WITH 1938 RESULTS IN PARENTHESIS: 
January 14 — Duke at Durham (4-4). 
January 28— Catholic U. at College Park (4-4). 
February 4 — Virginia at Charlottesville (3-5). 
February 11 — North Carolina at Chapel Hill (did not meet). 
February 18— Rutgers at College Park (3-6). 

February 24 and 25 — Southern Conference tourney at Columbia, S. C. 
March 4 — U. S. Military Academy at College Park (did not meet) . 
(Story next page) 



1939 Grid Outlook 
Appears Rosy 

OLD grads may look forward to the 
1939 football season with a great deal 
of confidence, as the outlook is exception- 
ally bright. The Terps will lose only one 
gridder who started in the late games. 
Charlie Weidinger, ace quarterback, and 
will regain "Persh" Mondorff, husky back, 
kept out by an appendectomy, and George 
Gienger, big and fast guard, shelved earlv 
by an injury, in addition to a lot of fine 
talent from the freshmen. 

Maryland also loses Jim Meade, great 
back, and Nick Budkoff, clever end, but 
they were out practically all of the 1938 
season; Rip Hewitt, all-around utility back; 
Jim Forrester, center, and John DeArmev, 
guard. However, it has ample material from 
the other leftovers and sophs-to-be to more 
than make up for their losses. 

Heagy Deserves Credit 

Then, too, Maryland played fine foot- 
ball in its last three games, although it won 
only one of them, that with Washington 
and Lee. The Terps dropped the Florida 
game on fumbling and gave the unbeaten 
Georgetown eleven the hardest scrap it had 
faced all season in the two clashes that pre- 
ceded the finale with the Generals. 

Great improvement in the work of the 
line, for which Al Heagy, Frank Dobson's 
able assistant, deserves a slap on the back, 
had much to do with the excellent showing 
of the team in the last three battles. Al 
was a great end for the Terps only a few- 
years back and he knows how to impart his 
knowledge on the finesse of line play. 

Comeback is Pleasing 

The final triumph over Washington and 
Lee and the earlier victory over Western 
Maryland, along with the comeback of the 
team in the last three tilts, kept the season 
from being barren. Loss of such key men 
as Jim Meade, Mondorff, Budkoff and 
Gienger so early in the campaign and con- 
stant injuries to others, threw Maryland off 
balance and gave the coaches a tremendous 
task and brought a bleak season where a 
rosy one was anticipated. 

Maryland, though, should come back 
strong in 1939 unless it runs into another 
series of ill luck, for it certainly appears as 
if the talent — that is for the Terps — will 
be as good, if not better, than any before 
assembled at College Park. 



10 



Maryland Alumni News 



Tossers Annex Two 
Of First Three 

MARYLAND'S basketball players, aft- 
er a holiday visit to their homes, are 
back on the job preparing for the game 
with Pennsylvania in Philadelphia on Jan- 
uarv 4th and the other sixteen contests 
that follow . 

Previous to the recess, the Terps won 
two of three Southern Conference clashes, 
to get off to a good start. They played good 
basketball in losing to Richmond U., 34-41, 
and defeating Clemson, 45-35 and David- 
son, 44-27, but they bore out the pre-sea- 
son statement of Coach Burton Shipley 
that he would have one good team but 
that reserves would be a tremendous prob- 
lem. Shiplev was too right where he would 
rather have been wrong. 

Maryland registered 123 points in the 
three games and the regulars Adam Ben- 
goechea and George DeWitt, forwards, 
Eddie Johnson, center, and George Knep- 
ley and Pershing Mondorff, guards, scored 
all but two of them. Shiplev used three re- 
serves in each the Richmond and Clemson 
games and five in the Davidson tilt and only 
Bill Rea, who got a basket in the latter 
stages of the third clash, counted. 

Knepley, a running guard, sets the pace 
in point-getting with 34, DeWitt has 28, 
Johnson 26, Bengoechea 24, and Mondorff, 
back guard, 9. 

However, it appears that Gene Ochsen- 
reiter, a lanky forward, needs only to over- 
come over-eagerness to develop into a val- 
uable tosser. 

Maryland's next home game is with Duke 
on January 13, with Army and Navy being 
visited on January 4 and 7, respectively, to 
join with Penn in giving the Terps a severe 
test on foreign courts. 



Boxing Team Should 
Be One Of Best 

Maryland appears due to have the best 
boxing team this season it ever has had out- 
side of the 1937 aggregation that was un- 
beaten in the regular campaign and carried 
off the Southern Conference crown. With 
lettermen for five of the eight weights and 
only the heavv class offering a real prob- 
lem, Lieut. Col. Harvev L. (Heinie) Mil- 
ler, head coach, does not hesitate to predict 
that he will have a tough outfit to lick. His 
ace, Benny Alperstein, who has won the 
125-pound national title for two vears in 
a row, will fight this season at 135, his nor- 



Grapevine News About Those We Know 



Visitors — A former diamond star for the 
Old Liners, Kenneth Karow, '35, recently 
visited the campus. Following his studies 
at College Park, Kenneth attended law- 
school from which he graduated in '37. At 
present he is with the United States Fi- 
delity and Guaranty Company of Baltimore. 
He is now located in Philadelphia as an 
adjuster on auto claims, public liabilities 
compensation, and accident and health. He 
resides at 8008 Lenox Road, Upper Darbv, 

Pennsylvania. 



Married — Marjorie Ruth Mowatt, '36, 
of College Park, was married to Dr. Harold 
George Shirk on November 21st last. Mrs. 
Shirk is secretary for the College of Com- 
merce. 



Sales Manager — F. F. Johnston, we 
have learned, is the District Sales Manager 
for the Stromberg Electric Company, with 
headquarters in Washington. 
O 

Married — Marvin Peach, '00, gave in 
marriage his daughter, Ann Tyler Peach, to 
Thomas Gorsuch Young, Jr., '3 5, LL.B., on 
December 6th at the Memorial Protestant 

mal weight. Other lettermen available are 
George Dorr, 120; Bob Bradley, 127; Na- 
than Askin, who battled at 13 5 in 1938, 
and Jose de Peralta, both good 145 pound- 
ers, and Newton Cox, 165. With the ex- 
ception of the heavyweight division. Mary- 
land is two deep in each class and there are 
only four seniors in the unusually large 
squad of thirty. One Terp who promises to 
be a sensation in the 155 pound class is 
Frank Cronin, who is good in track as the 
440-yard indoor and outdoor Southern Con- 
ference champion. He appears to be just as 
good a fighter as he is a runner. 

• 

Engineers of '33 
Have Reunion 

(Continued from Page 5) 
George Hockensmith is in business in 
Buffalo, N. Y. Married Miss Louise Bruck- 
ner of College Park. Thev have one child. 

Loren Adams is an engineer on the 
Grand Coulee Dam. 

So the C. E.'s of '33 sound off until 
April, 1939, when another Old Line ses- 
sion will be called to order. 



Episcopal Church in Baltimore. Mr. Peach 
is a prominent lawyer of Prince George's 
County and has served as president of the 
County Bar Association. Mr. Young is a 
promising young attorney of Baltimore. The 
newlyweds will reside in Cockevsville, Md. 



Law — John L. Bischoff, '31, formerly 
Attorney for the District Unemployment 
Compensation Board, announces the open- 
ing of offices for the general practice of law 
in the Investment Building in Washington. 
John is a member of the Phi Sigma Kappa 
fraternity and was active in tennis and R. 
O. T. C. while a student. 



Born on Homecoming Day — Barbara 
Anne Goodhart. the daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Raymond (Buddy) Goodhart, came 
into the world on a traditional Alumni day 
— Homecoming. That makes Barbara defi- 
nitely an Old Liner about 1955 and, no 
doubt, a member of Kappa Kappa Gamma, 
the same as mother, who was formerly 
Mary Keller. The Goodharts reside in Co- 
lonial Village. Va. 

o 

Tydings-for-President — Alumnus R. M. 
Watkins, '23, heads probably the first Tyd- 
ings-for-President Club in the country. Or- 
ator "Bunt" of the class of '23, took the 
stump for his fellow alumnus in the recent 
primary fight. Samuel Harvev, well-known 
former faculty member at the University, is 
secretary of the club. It is understood more 
clubs have been formed in several other 

states. 

O 

Married — Daniel Fahev, '28, formerly 
of Hyattsville, Md., and Miss Virginia Mc- 
Blair Garesche of Missouri were married 
this fall. "Dan" had taken part in twenty-six 
wedding ceremonies before his own. He 
said his practice was evident as he was 
very cool, calm, and collected. As a part 
of their honeymoon the newlyweds came 
east and the campus w-as numbered among 
their many places to visit. "Dan" is the 
landscape architect for the new million- 
and-a-half-dollar Jefferson Memorial being 
built in St. Louis. 

O 

Married — On July 9th Bowen S. Cran- 
dall, '32, and Miss Katherine Louise Tur- 
ner of Nashville, Tenn., were married in 



December, 1938 



11 






that city. It was a double ring ceremony. 
Mrs. Crandall is a graduate of Mississippi 
State College and for the past year has 
held a position as home economist with 
the Tennessee Valley Authority. Bowen is 
I forest pathologist for the U. S. D. A. and 
is located at Labannon, Tenn., where the 
newlyweds reside. 

O 

Note— While J. Herbert Snyder, '22, 
and his bride were honeymooning in the 
West, Maryland was climaxing the gridiron 
season with a glorious triumph. Herbert 
picked up a note about the game in the 
San Diego Union: "Substitute Halfback 
Fred Hewitt played his last game for the 
University of Maryland today, leading the 
oft-beaten Terrapins to a 19-13 aerial vic- 
tory over Washington and Lee. Handi- 
capped by sleet and snow, Hewitt com- 
pleted six passes in a row, good for two 
scores through the air and setting up a 
third touchdown which Hewitt made per- 
sonally with a 39-yard dash through cen- 
ter." Snyder married Miss Mary Louise 
Hoons of Hagerstown on November 9th 
and as a part of their honeymoon they at- 
tended the National Grange Convention 
in Portland, Oregon. When they heard 
about the Old Liners they were heading 
east bv the southern route. 



Lecture — Dr. Reginald Truitt will de- 
liver the Founder's Day address to the 
Pittsburgh Chapter of Sigma Xi, national 
honorary chemical fraternity, next month 
at the University of Pittsburgh Cathedral 
of Learning. 

O 

Engaged — For some time they have 
been engaged, but I believe we will be 
ahead of their marriage. Ann Carver, '37, 
and Ernest Lundell, '38, have decided to 
take the step sometime, possibly this June, 
if not before. 



Married — Frank "Pat" Duggan, '36, a 
Phi Delta Theta, and Miss Beatrice Phil- 
lips of Sudlersville, Md., were married Oc- 
tober 22nd, at Sudlersville. 



Married — Alvin O. Kuhn, '37, and Miss 
Elizabeth Cissel were married November 
23rd at West Friendship, Md. 



Married — In York, Pa., on the second 

of December, Leonard G. Mathias, '23, 

and Miss Mildred Marie Jenkins took the 

i matrimonial step. "Matty" is a member of 



the Kappa Alpha fraternity and now is in 
partnership with his brother in Hagerstown. 
He is active in Alumni affairs, serving as 
secretary of the Washington County group. 
The newlyweds will reside at 42 Broad- 
way, Hagerstown, Md. 
o 

Married — The News was somewhat 
tardy in announcing the engagement of 
"Dink" Doeller and Mary Beggs in a recent 
issue. They were married by the time the 
notice of their engagement was reported. 
Now thev are Mr. and Mrs. "Dink" Doeller. 



ATHLETIC 
CONTRIBUTIONS 



(Continued from Page 8) 
be in the offing. 

Professor Richardson, member of the 
Athletic Board, who has attended every 
grid banquet since 1909, as usual, was a 
fascinating conductor of the ceremonies. 

Victories Not Main Point 

Dr. Byrd said that Maryland enjoyed 
winning games as much as any other school, 
yet they did not overlook the fact that one 
of the greatest lessons that a football player 
could learn from the game was to get up 
after every defeat on the field or in life and 
keep plugging. 

Dr. Byrd went back to his former role 
as coach of the Terrapins and introduced 
some of his old boys from days gone by 
with stories illustrating their gridiron abili- 
ties. 

Mr. Holzapfel expressed the same senti- 
ments as Dr. Byrd in a short and interesting 
talk that was spiked by some timely anec- 
dotes. 

Gus Welch, of Carlisle Indian fame and 
lately coach at American University, enter- 
tained the crowd with football stories of 
the days of Pop Warner's great Indian 
teams. 

Zalesak Acts as Santa 

In a clever and amusing finale, Emile 
Zalesak, one-time ace Terp lacrosse goalie, 
played Santa Claus and presented each of 
the gridders with some token that brought 
hilarity from their fellow players. Zal had 
to put on a Santa wig but he needed to do 
no imitating as to his tummy. 



Biggest Moments 
in Football 

Garry Schumacher of the New York 
Journal has assembled a series of articles 
from various coaches on "My Biggest Mo- 
ment in Football." "Mai" Stevens, one of 
the greatest and certainly the most charm- 
ing among all of Yale's old Blues, has spent 
many a wearing Saturday afternoon since 
he's been coach at N. Y. U., but he avers 
that the most strenuous and nerve wrack- 
ing experience of his football career was a 
game in New Haven in 1923 that pitted 
the Elis against Maryland. "I think all of 
us Yales aged ten years during that after- 
noon," he said. "Not only was it the 
toughest game in which any of us had 
ever played but it all happened unexpect- 
edly and without the slightest warning. 
That was the year we had the good team 
at New Haven — the only all-winning Yale 
team since the war — and Maryland was 
supposed to be the 'breather' on the sched- 
ule the week before the Princeton game. 
'Tad' Jones thought so little of it that he 
took Captain Bill Mallory and 'Century' 
Milstead, our best lineman, up to Prince- 
ton to watch the Tigers play Harvard. 
That's what scared us most, I think, when 
Maryland scored two touchdowns in the 
first five minutes of the game — the thought 
of what would happen when 'Tad' came 
back to New Haven. Anyway, that's the 
way it stood after five minutes, 14 to 
in favor of Maryland. After that it was 
plain mayhem. We simply had to win that 
one, and the Marylanders, with that start, 
didn't intend to yield. I didn't start the 
game, but got in after that second touch- 
down, and circumstances gave me a break 
right away. I got loose for forty yards after 
taking a kick, and a couple of plays later 
slipped a tackle to break away for a touch- 
down. 'Why, those guys are easy,' I crowed 
in the huddle. 'I can't understand how 
they could give you trouble.' Somebody 
must have heard me, because they were 
the last yards I gained that afternoon. And 
I still carry the scars of the pounding I 
took in the ensuing action. All the Prince- 
ton and Harvard games in which I ever 
played were pink teas in comparison. Hap- 
pily Billy Neale got away on a touchdown 
run in the third period, and even later field 
goal finally gave us a 16-to-14 victory." 



SPICKNALL 

A former Maryland rifleman, Lieut. Wil- 
liam Spicknall of Company F of Hvatts- 
ville, of the First Regiment, Maryland Na- 
tional Guard, was one of the members of 



HONORED 

the team that won the Hilton trophy at 
Camp Perry to be honored recently bv his 
organization. He and the others were feted 
at a dinner and each was given a medal, 



DO MOT CIRC, 




Copyright 1938, LIGGETT & MYERS TOBACCO Co. 




ALUMNI 
NEWS 



JANUARY 
1939 






0$ 

Pu 

<D 

ha 

r-t 
»-« 

o 
u 






^>?* 



The One Hundred and Thirty-Second 

Charter Day Celebration 

University of Maryland 

Friday, January 20, 1939 Lord Baltimore Hotel 

Baltimore 

For Reservations, Write or Phone 

W. M. HlLLEGEIST 

University of Maryland, Baltimore 

Phone PLaza 1100 




Col. FRANK W. WEED, '03 

United States Medical Corps 

Honorary Chairman 





Dr. H. C. BYRD, '08 

President, University ot Maryland 
Host 



Mrs. JOHN PAUL TROY, '17, R.N. 

Past President 

Ntmsv.s Ai.itmh*f A<:sm 



Volume X 



MARYLAND ALUMNI NEWS, JANUARY, 1939 



Number 8 



Alumni Association — University of Maryland 

Founded in 1892 



OFFICERS FOR 1938 - 39 

C. Walter Cole, '21, President 
Tovvson, Md. 

Charles W. Sylvester, '08, Vice-President Baltimore, Md. 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Secretary-Treasurer College Park, Md. 

ALUMNI BOARD 
(Note — The officers named above are also members of the Alumni Board) 

Reuben Brigham, '08 Arts and Sciences 

Charles V. Koons, '29 Engineering 

P. W. Chichester, '20 Education 

John A. Silkman, '35 Agriculture 

Ruth Miles, '31 Home Economics 

MEMBERS AT LARGE 

Esther Hughes Lee, '33 Women's Representative 

J. Donald Kieffer, '30 Men's Representative 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Editor 

Maryland Alumni News, issued monthly by the University of Maryland Alumni Associa- 
tion at College Park, Md., as second-class matter under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Annual Alumni Association dues are $2.00. One year's subscription to Alumni News, 
50 cents. 

GROUP LEADERS 

Allegany County: E. Brooke Whiting, '98, President; Dr. Joseph Franklin, '21, Secretary, 

Cumberland, Md. 
Baltimore County: C. Walter Cole, '21, President; H. B. Derrick, '17, Secretary, Towson, Md. 
Baltimore City: Chester Tawney, '31, President, 4022 Roland Avenue; E. Gordon Ham- 
mond, '34, Secretary, 1023 W. Barre Street, Baltimore, Md. 
Caroline County: George W. Clendaniel, '20, President, Denton, Md.; Dr. Maurice A. Brackett, 

'21, Treasurer, Denton, Md.; Mrs. George W. Clendaniel, '21, Secretary, Denton, Md. 
Harford County: W. B. Munnikhuvsen, '14, President; H. M. Carroll, '20, Secretary, Bel 

Air, Md. 
Frederick County: J. Homer Remsberg, '18, President; Henry R. Shoemaker, '17, Secretary, 

Frederick, Md. 
Montgomery County: Lawrence G. Smoot, '18, President, Kensington, Md.; Mary Fisher, '36, 

Secretary, Rockville, Md. 
New York City: Donald Kieffer, '30, President, 195 Broadway; Sarah Morris, '25, Secretary, 

140 E. 63rd Street, New York City. 
Philadelphia: A. Moulton McNutt, '06, President, 413 Cooper Street, Camden, N. J.; J. P. 

Mudd, '07, Secretary, 174 Manheim Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Pittsburgh: E. Minor Wenner, '27, President, 1111 Gladys Avenue; Dr. A. A. Krieger, '32, 

Secretary Highland Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Washington, D. C: J. Douglas Wallop, '19, President, 6139 N. Dakota Avenue, N.W.; 

Charles V. Koons, '29, Secretary, 419 Fourth Street, N.E., Washington. 
Washington County: Hon. Henry Holzapfel, Jr., '93, President, Hagerstown, Md.; L. G. 

Mathias, '23, Secretary, Hagerstown, Md. 

"M" CLUB OFFICERS AND BOARD MEMBERS 

Donald H. Adams, '28 President Dr. E. N. Cory, '09 Secretary-Treas. 

A. K. Besley, '23 Vice-President W. B. Maslin, '09 Historian 

REPRESENTATIVES 



G. F. Pollock, '23 Baseball 

H. B. Shipley, '14 Basketball 

Stewart McCaw, '35 Boxing 

James Stevens, '19 Lacrosse 

Lewis W. Thomas, '28 Track 



James Busick, '35 Tennis 

Charles Remsberg, '26 Cross Country 

W. C. Supplee, '26 Football 

Dr. E. B. Friedenwald, '03 \ . , 

Dr. A. W. Valentine, '04 } At Lar S e 



Cover Picture 

While the University is celebrating its 
founding one hundred and thirty-two 
years ago, here stands a sentinel which be- 
gan its growth before the University. This 
tree stands as the oldest relic on the Uni- 
versity campus in Baltimore. 

In practically every picture made of the 
"Oldest Medical Building" in America 
devoted to teaching, this tree is the shin- 
ing factor. A gift of nature, standing watch 
over man's handiwork. 



Fellow Alumni 

On January 20th we celebrate the found- 
ing of our Alma Mater upon the occasion 
of our annual Charter Day Dinner and 
Dance, to be held at the Lord Baltimore 
Hotel, Baltimore. This prompts within 
us the spirit to renew our allegiance to 
our Alma Mater. It is our hope that this 
year's affair will be the largest and most 
enthusiastic of the several interesting gath- 
crings heretofore held. 

We are working earnestly to improve 
our association in every respect. We call 
your attention to the attractive appear- 
ance of the Alumni News and the many 
worthwhile items therein. We are plan- 
ning a proposed reorganization of the as- 
sociation, looking toward the establish- 
ment of the Alumni Fund on a permanent 
basis under the direction of capable trus- 
tees. This fund can and will be augmented, 
whereby the association will have a means 
of offering scholarships and loan funds to 
worthy students, which is a pressing need 
of the University at this time.. 

The next issue of the Alumni News 
will contain an announcement about the 
establishment of an Alumni headquarters, 
which we believe will be pleasing and ap- 
pealing to all Alumni. This has been one 
of our main objectives this year, which 
now appears possible of realization. 

Will see you on the 20th! 
Sincerely yours, 

C. Walter Cole, '21, 

President. 



Maryland Alumni News 



University To 
Present Opera Star 

On Thursday. February 2nd, in the 
Ritchie Coliseum, at College Park, the 
University Public Functions Committee 
will present Nino Martini, tenor star of 
the Metropolitan Opera. Dr. T. B. Sy- 
mons, chairman of the committee, has ap- 
pointed Professor Harlan Randall, director 
of music at the University, in charge of 
the concert. Tickets are on sale and all 
seats are reserved. Prices are $2.00, $1.50, 
$1.00 and 75 cents. The 75-cent tickets 
are for any seat in the south stands, the 
same as those used for boxing and basket- 
ball, sections A, B, and C. The north side 
stands are for the student body. 
Nino Martini 

In the short span of years since his 
meteoric rise, the magnificent voice and 
dynamic personality of Nino Martini have 
earned him such tremendous success and 
international recognition, that today he 
stands at the very pinnacle of achieve- 
ment — the song artist supreme — in the 
four fields of vocal art — opera, concert, 
radio, and motion pictures. 

His brilliant achievements on the great 
stage of the Metropolitan Opera House, 
on the concert platforms of two conti- 
nents, and in radio are now equalled bv 
his sensational starring successes in mo 
tion pictures. 

Martini's voice on the air is an irre- 
sistible magnet that holds millions of list- 
eners spellbound. He is the only singer 
ever to have received that coveted broad- 
casting honor, the Columbia medal for 
distinguished contribution to radio art, 
awarded also to Leopold Stokowski, Colo- 
nel Lindbergh and Admiral Byrd, and to 
Martini as "the man, who more clearly 
than any other individual, symbolizes that 
artistic perfection whereby radio lives and 
grows." 

Come, hear Martini, February 2nd at 
College Park, Ritchie Coliseum. 

• 
Engaged — Miss Jane Wilson, '39, a 
member of Kappa Kappa Gamma, has an- 
nounced her engagement to Mr. Charles 
C. Heaton, '38, a member of Kappa Alpha 
Fraternity. Charles is stationed at Fort 
Meade at the present. No date has been 
set for the wedding. 
O 

Found — A Maryland ring was found in 
the vicinity of New York. Anyone who 
lost a ring should write the Alumni of- 
fice, giving ring number and class. 




Harry D. Watts, '04 

Watts, '04, Constructs 
Buildings On Campus 

Back to the campus comes Harry D. 
Watts, '04, to take part in the two mil- 
lion dollars building program. This time 
he is vice-president of the fames Stewart 
Construction Company of New York, 
who has been awarded the contract for 
construction of the addition to the Engi- 
neering Building, the Dining Hall, Poultry 
and Home Economics Buildings. This ad- 
dition will be made on the north side of 
the present building and will face the 
north. It will be the first major building 
in the new campus layout. 

Watts is a graduate of the College of 
Engineering and now has a hand in the 
construction for its development. His first 
construction on the campus was the west 
stands of the Bvrd Stadium built and ded- 
icated at the first Homecoming Football 
Game in the fall of 1923. On that day the 
dedicatory ceremonies took place at half 
time and they had a tough time catching 
Curly 's coat-tail long enough to inform 
him of the fact that the Stadium would be 
dedicated in his honor and for his great 
contribution to athletics. 

A few years later Watts went to New 
York and his rise in the engineering pro- 
fession has been rapid. Last winter he 
was the master of ceremonies at the annual 
mid-winter banquet of the Old Line 
Alumni Group in New York. Harry has 
always been one to take a keen interest in 
activities of the Alumni in behalf of the 
University. 



Bachelor's Benefit Ball 
Held On Campus 

Here was a break. A "Bachelor's Bene- 
fit Ball," sponsored by the Women's 
League, of which Miss Helen Reindollar 
is president. The general purpose of the 
dance was to have everything reversed, the 
girls ask the boys. At the dance the girls 
did the breaking and asking for dances. 

Consideration, however, was given the 
uninvited bachelor. He could attend, pro- 
vided he was accompanied by a campus 
date. 

Photographers from Life were on hand 
to get a few pictures of Maryland's initial 
Bachelor's Benefit Ball. 

Inter-Fraternal 
Sing 

Under the auspices of Tri Delt an inter- 
fraternity-sorority sing was recently con- 
ducted on the campus. The general theme 
was to have competition between the fra- 
ternities and sororities in singing. Each 
group had the privilege of presenting a 
song skit. There were several very attract- 
ive numbers presented. The popular num- 
ber "Ferdinand" was outstanding, also 
the story of "Little Red Riding Hood" in 
music. The affair has possibilities of being 
one of the leading events of the campus. 
The winner of the contest and trophv 
was Kappa Delta Sorority. 

• 

R. B. Criswell 
Dies Suddenly 

Students and members of the facultv 
were shocked by the sudden death of Pro- 
fessor Robert B. Criswell Tuesday. 

His death came as a result of a heart 
attack at his home in Hyattsville. 

Professor Criswell's work in fire pre- 
vention throughout the State makes his 
death a great loss not only to the students 
and faculty members here, but to the State 
at large. 

The Diamondback and the Alumni 
News join the students and members of 
the local staff in extending sympathy to 
Professor Criswell's family. 

• 
Teaching — Ethel Enderlee, '38, a grad 
in the College of Education, is teaching 
Biology, Chemistry, Business Arithmetic, 
and Civics at Southern High School at 
Lothian, Md. Ethel says "some of her 
students are just out of their 'teens." 



January, 1939 



Alumni Help Celebrate Charter Day 



T_JlS Excellency, Herbert R. O'Conor, 
•*- -*■ Governor of Maryland and graduate 
or the University Law School in 1912, 
will be the guest of honor at the annual 
University Charter Day Celebration, Jan- 
uary 20th, in Baltimore. The Honorable 
\Ym. P. Cole, U. S. Congressman from 
Maryland and a graduate from the College 
Park Schools in 1910 and the Law School 
in 1912, will be the toastmaster. Hon- 
orary Chairman for the celebration will 
be Col. Frank \V. Weed, a graduate of 
the Medical School in 1903. Colonel Weed 
now is senior medical officer at the U. S. 
Military Academy at West Point. Directing 
Chairman for the occasion is Dr. Frank 
L. Black, '04, a grad of Pharmacy, who 
is assisted by Mrs. Page Edmunds, a grad- 
uate of Nursing in 1905. 

Nurses Celebrate 

In addition to the University celebra- 
tion, the Nursing School will be celebrat 
ing the fiftieth anniversary of its begin- 
ning. Mrs. John Paul Troy will give a 
brief resume of those important facts af- 
fecting the beginning of Nursing at Mary- 
land. 

As this is written reservations for tables 
are being received at a rapid rate. Each 
school and college in this University has 
been assigned a number of tables, giving 
each an equal number of desirable ones. 
The various county organizations have 
taken an active interest in seeing that each 
county is well represented. Following this 
article the names of those in the various 
counties who are cooperating in making 
the celebration a success appear. Faculty 
members are also giving a lot of emphasis 
to this affair and their names are included 
as members of the contact committees for 
the various schools and colleges. 

"Old Pal Party" Last Year 

Last year the Celebration was such a 
success that several tables have been re- 
served for nearly a year. There were some 
classes and organization groups which 
made up tables and held a real reunion. 
As previously stated, the Baltimore Sun 
said the affair culminated into an "Old 
Pal Party" with faculty and Alumni be- 
coming well acquainted. 

For reservations, wire or phone W. N. 
Hillegeist, Plaza 1100, Lombard and 
Greene Streets, Baltimore, Md. The date 



is Friday, January 20th, the time 7 P. M., 
the place the Lord Baltimore Hotel. 

Following are the county and faculty 
committees: 

Allegany County — Chairman — F. Brooke 
Whiting, '98, LL.B. 

College Park—R. F. McHenry, '16; John 
McDonald, '30; H. R. Aldridge, '25; H. 
W. Gilbert, '30; A. G. Wallis, '23; Maud 
A. Bean; Fred Hetzel. '30; Harold 
Naughton, '34. Law— A. A. Doub, '28; 
G. W. Legge, Jr., '08. Medicine— W. A. 
Grade, '10; A. H. Hawkins, '95; W. O. 
McLane, Jr., '24; K. Reynolds, '25; W. 
F. Williams, '16; F. W. Cowheard, '08; 
Jos. Franklin, '20. Nursing — Mrs. Wil- 
bur V. Wilson, '12. Pharmacy — Elmer 
R. Kellough, '10; Geo. D. Campbell, '00. 
Dentistry—A. C. Cook, '33; A. P. Dixon, 
•11; Karl P. Heintz, '05; H. Teter, '28. 

Anne Arundel County — Chairman — J. O. 
Purvis, '04, M.D. 

College Park— Fred Bull, '25; Betty 
Amos Bull, '26; Benj. Watkins, Jr., '07; 
J. A. Bromley, '17; Benj. Watkins, III, 
'25; E. D. Page, '28; W. E. Tarbell, '24; 
Stanley Day, '16. Law — Judge Ridgely 
P. Melvin, '02; R. C. Rowe, '24; W. G. 
Gott, Jr., '35; R. E. Kindred, '22. Medi- 
cine — A. L. Anderson, '24; J. S. Billings- 
lea, '05; R. A. Hammond, '92; J. W. 
Martin, '17; J. J. Murphy, '96; Geo. 
Basil, '27. Nursing — Ruth Dahlmer, '16; 
Katherine O. Shea, '13. Pharmacy — J. 
H. Codd, '08; W. E. Albrecht, '23; T. W. 
Alexander, '07. Dentistry — C. T. Brice, 
'30; Geo. Feldmeyer, '88; C. P. Russell. 
'27. 

Baltimore County — Chairman — H. B. 
Derrick, '18, B.S. 

College Park— Ruth Diggs, '32; Billy 
Groff, '00; Ellen Ensor, '35; H. McDon- 
ald, '20; W. H. Mays, '11; D. Jenifer, '04; 
Wm. Carroll, '18; W. P. Hicks, '20; Sey- 
mour Ruff, Jr., '16. Law — Frank I. 
Duncan, '84; L. K. Ensor, '19; H. C. 
Jenifer, '08; Allen McLane, '88; C. W. 
Miller, '00; W. C. Mylander, '19; C. V. 
Roe, '21; M. R. Smith, '28. Medicine — 
C. C. Ayres, '14; W. C. Ensor, '00; A. M. 
France, '32; C. V. Mace, '97; H. D. Par- 
dum, '02. Nursing — Mrs. D. Brooks, '21; 
Mrs. L. A. Cecil, '17; Mrs. D. W. Justice, 
'21; S. U. Ricketts, '11. Pharmacy— A. G. 
Leatherman, '20; T. E. Fields, '21; Eli 
Fedder, '24; Howard E. Loftus, '38. Dent- 
istry— L. W. Bimestefer, '34; J. P. Sen- 
cindiver, '13; R. P. Smith, '17. 

Baltimore City — Chairman — Chester 
Tawnev, '31, B.S. 

College Park— Wilbur Street, '21; Rob- 
ert Kent, '34; Gordon Hammond, '34; 
Charlie Miller, '32; O. D. Crothers, '29; 
W. H. Whiteford, '26; Elga Jarboe, '34; 
Mildred Kettler, '31; Charles Lindhart, 
'12; Austin Diggs, '21; Ruth Miles, '31; 
Aaron Friendenwald, '29; John Silk- 
man, '35. 



Calvert County — Chairman — Page C. 
Jett, '31, M.D. 

College Park— J. B. Gray, Jr., '14; T. 

B. Mackall, '08; Clara Dixon, '34; Claude 
Turner, '09; Julius Parran, '22; John B. 
Morsell. Law — F. M. Tongue, '25. Medi- 
cine — Edward Briscoe, '18. Nursing — 
Mrs. Wm. H. Dowell, '08. 

Caroline County — Chairman — J. O. 
Knotts, '14, LL.B. 

College Park—L. O. Jarrell, '09; Ro- 
land Carey, '11; Bessie M. Spafford; 
Mrs. G. Clendaniel, '21; William Hen- 
derson, '36; Albert White, '14; W. L. 
Howard, '27; M. S. Whitely, '30; Clayton 
Reynolds. '22. Law— T. Allan Golds- 
borough, '01; W. H. VanSant, '33. Med- 
icine — W. W. Goldsborough, '01; E. P. 
Knotts, '20; W. K. Knotts, '25; W. E. 
Lennon, '25. Nursing — Mrs. W. E. Len- 
non, '26. Dentistry — M. A. Brackett, '21. 

Carroll County — Chairman — Thomas H. 
Legg, '07, M.D. 

College Park — Sherman E. Flanagan. 
'24; Donald E. Watkins, '23; Herbert 
Snyder, '22; B. W. Crapster, '12; A. R. 
Drach, '11; B. H. Miller, '28; L. C. 
Burns, '23; Agnes Shindee. Law — 
V. A. Tubman, '36; A. P. Forsythe, '08; 
S. I. Heff, '34. Medicine— Chas. R. Foutz. 
'97; J. L. Marsh, '24; Margaret V. Beyer. 
'24; Stanley Graybill, '21. Nursing — Ber- 
nice N. Dutterer, '34. Pharmacy — Ar- 
thur Tracey, '10; Robert A. Pilson, '21. 
Dentistry — J. E. Myers, '01; Geo. D. 
Resh, '25; R. H. Garey, '19. 

Cecil County — Chairman — Harry Cant- 
well, '06, M.D. 

College Park— Sara Jack, '35; G. W. 
Johnson, '24; Geo. B. Gifford, '23; Thom- 
as Cruikshank, '23; Ralph H. Beachley. 
'22; Z. J. Miller, '28. Low— Albert Con- 
stable, '36. Medicine — C. I. Benson, '09; 
H. V. Davis, '27; Ernest Rowland, '95. 
Nursing — Mrs. John F. Fassett, '23; Mrs. 
G. H. Richard, '08. Pharmacy — Andrew 
Lyon, '22; Miss K. E. Kirk, 34. Dentist- 
ry— H. R. Cooper, '18; Walter Kirk, '27; 
James L. Trone, '26. 

Charles County — Chairman — H. M. Cos- 
ter, '09, B.S. 

College Park — Mary Graham, '34; Hel- 
en Ryon, '26; W. J. Lyon, '22; C. R. 
Durrough, '98; H. R. Wilmer, '19; Paul 

D. Brown. Law — Judge Walter J. 
Mitchell, '94; J. D. Diggs, '36. Medicine — 
Fred Chappelear, '05. Dentistry — Fred 

C. Shaw, '10. 

Dorchester County — Chairman — Calvin 
Harrington, '34, LL.B. 

College Park — John Mace, '25; A. M. 
Ahalt, '31; Margery Willoughby. '33 
James Andrews, '31; C. R. Andrews, '16 

E. B. Corkran, '20; P. F. Richardson, '19 
Wm. R. McKnight; James Busick, '35 
Hattie E. Brooks. Law — James McAllis- 
ter, '34. Medicine— W. M. Faw, '30; E. 
E. Lamkin, '98; Guy Steele, '97. Nursing 
— Mrs. Theodore Dougois, '29. 

(Continued on Page 6) 



Maryland Alumni News 



UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF NURSING 
CELEBRATES FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY 



bv Mrs. Page Edmunds, '05, R.N. 



( Xote — The following is an article of historical facts which were a part of 
the origin of the University of Maryland School of Nursing, founded in 1889. 
Mrs. Edmunds, a graduate of Nursing in 1905, is a prominent civic leader of 
Baltimore and has always had considerable interest in the welfare of the School 
of Nursing. She is vice-chairman of the 132nd Charter Dav Celebration of the 
University, being held January 20, 1939, in Baltimore.) 



~\ /TORE than a century ago there was 
-L*-*-born into this world an individual 
who, bv the native instinct of woman, be- 
came the pioneer in raising the art of nurs- 
ing from a menial occupation to that of in 
honorable vocation. Well known to ever}' 
nurse and to many who have received the 
benefits of her teaching is the name of 
Florence Nightingale of England. Her 
fame became international as a result of 
her great work during the Crimean War of 
1854. 

The only public recognition of her serv- 
ices she would sanction was the raising 
of a fund to establish a training school 
foi nurses. Thus in 1860 the Nightingale 
Nursing School at the St. Thomas Hos- 
pital in London came into being. From 
this school some twenty years later was 
graduated Miss Louisa Parsons, the found- 
er and first superintendent of nurses of 
the University of Maryland School of 
Nursing. This beginning was in 1889 — 
fiftv vears ago. Miss Parsons was a good 
organizer and under her administration 
the school was established on a firm foun- 
dation. At the first commencement in 
1892 eight voung women were graduated. 
and through the courtesy of St. Thomas 
Hospital in London, the privilege of wear 
ing the Florence Nightingale cap was 
granted, a distinction not permitted to 
graduates of any other training school in 
the United States. Even after Miss Par- 
sons' resignation as superintendent of the 
school she did not lose interest, which is 
attested bv the fact that at her death, 
a substantial bequest was left for the ben- 
efit of the nurses at the Nurses' Club, 
along with her decorations and medals. 

The Code of Ethics and Fundamental 
Teaching of Nursing, a book compiled by 
Miss Nightingale, is used today in the 
teaching of the finer arts of nursing. 

From that day to this the graduates of 
the University of Maryland School of 
Nursing have eagerly given a helping hand 



in national distress. Many rendered con- 
spicuous services during the World War. 
Piobablv outstanding among them were 
Miss Barbara Stouffer, who received the 
Roval Red Cross at the hands of the 
Prince of Wales. 

Today the nurses of the School of Nurs- 
ing carrv on the spirit of Florence Night- 
ingale for the comfort and benefits of 
mankind. 



Eddy Duchin 

Playing For Junior Prom 

The Junior Prom, top ranking social 
event of the season, will have a top-notch 
oichestra to provide the music. Eddv Du- 
chin, popular magic fingers of radio, will 
be at the piano. 

It is expected that several movie stars, 
who are expected to be in Washington 
for the President's Birthday Party, will 
attend the Prom. Last year, Eleanor Pow- 
ell and Rav Bolger, prominent Hollywood 
artists, were present and gave a brief ex- 
hibition dance. 

The Prom will be held January 26th at 
the Willard Hotel in Washington. 
• 

Married — Miss Barbara Lee, a Delta of 
the class of '35, was married to Mr. Er- 
nest B. Norvell on Saturday, September 
3rd, in the St. Luke's Episcopal Church 
in Bladensburg. Mr. Norvell is from Ok- 
lahoma. 




(Continued from Page 5 



Pharmacy — Ben McAllister, '27. Dent- 
istry — James C. Johnson, '34; James P. 
Swing. '24. 

Frederick County — Chairman — P. \\ . 
Chichester, '20, B.S. 

College Park— J. H. Remsburg. '18; 
Helen E. Pearson; Phil Wertheimer. 
'29; T. Edgie Russell, '07; Mrs. B. B. 
Gow, '35; Ross Smith, '29; Charles Rems- 
burg, '26; H. R. Shoemaker. '17. Law — 
David C. Winebrener, '22; Amos A. 
Holter, '32; Charles Mathias, '11; Wm. 
C. McSherry. '10. Medicine — M. A. Bire- 
ly, '94; C. H. Conley, '99; Elmer Ke- 
fauver, '91; O. D. Stone, '93; Edward 
Thomas, '16. Nursing — Mrs. Talbot Price. 
'29; Elizabeth L. March, '17. Pharmacy— 
Victor G. Mercer, '25. Dentistry— T. S. 
Eader, '82; D. G. Everhart, '10 F. V. 
Swaerington, '24; W. E. Trail, '26. 

Garrett County — Chairman — W. \\ . 
Grant, '09, D.D.S. 

College Park— J. H. Carter, '26; Mary 
M. Miller. '33; Frank Getty, '30; Helen 
Custer, '27; Charles Miller. '30; Marga- 
ret Curtis, '30. Law — J. C. Renninger. 
Jr., '36. Medicine— H. W. McComas, '88; 
N. I. Broadwater, '09; E. I. Baumgart- 
ner, '31. Nursing— Clara K. Wilbur, '32. 
Pharmacy — W. A. Sturgiss, '96; Michael 
J. Ward, '34. 

Harford County — Chairman — James S. 
Hopkins, '05, D.D.S. 

College Park—H. M. Carroll, '20; Cath- 
erine Maunce, '38; Robert Archer, '35; 
Harry R. Dyer. '34; P. B. Harlan, '25; 
Gladden Davis, '13; John Clark, '34; Wil- 
lette Bland, '21. Nursing — Grace I. Bay, 



'07; Marie Clark, '33; Mrs. E. C. Hood, 
14; Mary D. Sullivan, "11. Law— Ed- 
ward H. W. Harlan, "11; W. D. Leitheser, 
'29; E. C. Wilson, '29; G. A. Pfaffenbach. 
'26. Medicine— C. J. Foley, '21; C. H. 
Kriete, '95; A. F. VanBibber, '96; W. E. 
Gallion. Jr., '12; F. W. Steiner, '07; J. H. 
Day, '08. Pharmacy — Lloyd Richardson. 
'12; A. L. Lyon, "14; David B. Betz, '13. 
Dentistry— M. E. Little. '26; Paul Wil- 
helm. '25; C. A. Willis. Jr., '25. 

Howard County — Chairman — James 
Clark. '10, LL.B. 

College Park— E. K. Remsburg, '29; 
J. W. Mumford, '23; Louise Howard, '28; 
Max Smith, '32; Blanche Waller; J. 
W. Magruder. '25; Martha Mannaham. 
'26; W. G. Myers. '30. Law— Judge Cor- 
nelius Subert, '25; Judge W. H. Forsythe. 
Jr., '97. Medicine — B. B. Braumbaugh, 
'16; Frank O. Miller. '02; Alfred Her- 
bert, '25. Nursing — Mrs. Alpha Herbert, 
'24. Pharmacy — M. J. Fitzsimmons, '28; 
Theodore Niznik. '30. Dentistry — L. L. 
Brown. '23. 

Kent County — Chairman — Frank Hines. 
'04. M.D. 

College Pari;— Ella Hadaway, '29; W. 
B. Harris, '04; Norman Pennington, '30; 
Stanley Sutton. '28; Helen Schellinger, 
'37; James McLane. Law — S. Scott 
Beck. '06; Richard Rogers, '12. Phar- 
macy — Donald F. Stam, '08. Dentistry — 
S. H. Wright, '28. 

Montgomery County — Chairman — Law 
rence R. Smoot, '18. B.S. 

College Park — Edith M. Turner; 
Mrs. Lillian Wilson. '24; Robert Miller. 
(Continued on Page 7) 



January, 1939 

Gambrill, '92, Eminent 
Alumnus Succumbs 

Our eminent alumnus and citizen, the 
Honorable Stephen W. Gambrill, a mem- 
ber of the class of '92, succumbs. He was 
the U. S. Congressman from the Fifth 
District of Maryland and had served in 
Congress since 1925, when he was ap- 
pointed to fill the unexpired term of the 
late Honorable Sydney Mudd. 

Congressman Gambrill was born and 
raised in Maryland, graduating with an 
A.B. degree in a classical course at the 
College Park schools of the University in 
1892. His classmates were the late Hon 
orable J. Enos Ray. Fred. W. Beslev. 
George H. Calvert, Frank Chew, John D. 
Brooks, and the Rev. Edward D. Johnson. 
Graduate In Law 

In 1897 he was admitted to the Mary- 
land Bar after completing a law course at 
Columbia University in Washington, D. C. 
He then began the practice of law in Bal- 
timore and developed quite an interest in 
politics. In 1920 he was elected to the 
Marvland House of Delegates, and in 1924 
was elected to the State Senate. 

In the United States Congress he has 
been primarily interested and active on 
river and harbor improvements in the 
tidewaters of the Fifth Congressional Dis- 
trict, including the Chesapeake Bay, the 
Potomac River, and their tributaries. 

Congressman Gambrill was a Democrat 
and resided at Laurel, Md. 

On behalf of the Alumni of the Uni- 
versity the News takes this occasion to 
express sincere condolence to his bereaved 
familv. 



Alumni Help 
Celebrate Charter Day 

'24; Roland Ward. '31; J. Darby Bow- 
man, '02; Merrick Wilson, '29; Reuben 
Brigham, '08: Ralph Chase, '23; H. P. 
Hartshorn. '21; Loren Schott. '25; O. W. 
Anderson, '24; Mortson Sclar, '32. Law — 
John Oxley, 20. Medicine — J. W. Bird, 
'07; Leo M. Cavanough, '13; C. E. Haws. 
'21. Nursing — Frances M. Leisher, '28. 
Dentistry — Geo. B. Clendenin. '29. Phar- 
macy — Jos. Stimek. '30; Harry H. Show- 
acre, '15. 

Prince George's County — Chairman — 
James G. Sasscer, '34, M.D. 

College Park — Ethel Regan; P. E. 
Clar, '18; E. Nelson StoufTer, '29; T. D. 
Jarrell, '09; E. F. Zalesak. '25; Wellstood 
White, '05; Evelyn Harrison, '32; E. F. 
Tingley. '27; J. J. Graham, '06; Harry 
Townsend. '13; Thomas Duley. '32. Law — 
Judge Benjamin Mattingly, '09; S. M. 
Peach, '04; Thomas H. Welsh, Jr., '35. 
Medicine— W. H. Gibbons. '84; Guy Lat- 




Stephen W. Gambriel, '92 



imer, '01; Byran Warren. '24; Allen Grif- 
fith, '09. Pharmacy — Jack Schneider, '26. 
Dentistry— Ray Vawter. '28; S. W. Dor- 
set. '22. Nursing— Miss Estella C. Bald- 
win, '27; Miss Alice Walker. '38. 

Queen Anne's County — Chairman — Sid- 
ney Gadd. '24, A.C. 

College Park—E. W. Baker, '31; Mrs. 
K. W. Baker, '32; Virgil Troy, '23; Mr. 
and Mrs. Frank Day. '21 and '20; James 
Knotts, '24; Wirt Bartlett. '25. Law-- 
Judge Thomas J. Keating, '93; Thomas J. 
Keating, Jr., '25. Medicine— W. H. Fish- 
er. '05; Norman Dudley. '01. Nursing — 
Martha Keating, '97. Dentistry — Denzell 

C. Blenvins, '16. Pharmacy — Elmer E. 
Moyer, '84; Charles F. Jarvis. '27. 

St. Mary's County — Chairman — Dr. L. B. 
Johnson, '88, M.D. 

CoUege Park— G. E. Hamilton, '88; J. 
J. Johnson; S. V. Shannahan. '37. 
Law— W. A. Loker, '33. Medicine— C. H. 
Camalier, '76; H. D. Lewis, '00. Dentist- 
ry—Robert Towill, '25. 

Somerset County — Chairman — George C. 
Coulbourne, '10, M.D. 

CoUege Park — Ben Barnes. '23; Mar- 
garet White, '33. Law — Kirk Maddrix, 
'27; S. L. Cochrane, '14. Medicine— W. 
H. Coulbourne. '01; R. R. Norris, '04; T. 

D. Whaley, '24. Nursing — Martha Hoff- 
man, '23; Mrs. G. E. Coulbourne, '14. 
Pharmacy — Harry C. Lewis, '11; Arthur 
R. Shipley, '32. Dentistry — F. Foster 
Todd, '90. 

Talbot County — Chairman — Leonard V. 
Johnson, '04, Ph.G. 

College Park—K. S. Brown, '15; J. C. 
Brato, '29; Wm. H. Ellicott, '29; W. A. 
Gemeny, '17; Carroll Lowe, '11; Mar- 
garet Smith, '34. Law — Judge W. M. 
Sheehan, '96; S. H. Wrightson, '34; M. L. 
Goldsborough, '12; G. R. Marshall, '14. 
Pharmacy — Peyton Home. '30. Medicine 
—A. Cover. '91; J. H. Hope. '06; A. C. 
Newman, '32; S. D. Willson. '00. Dentist- 
ry— F. B. Shinn. '25; W. G. Foster, '81; 

E. A. Coble, '17; Charles Fuller, '12. 



Glee Club Concert 
Attended By Old Grads 

With the first Glee Club and Chorus 
Concert there was presented a very in- 
teresting and new idea. From the Alumni 
files the addresses of those former Glee 
Club members were compiled. Each was 
sent an imitation and, to the enjoyment 
and delight of a capacity crowd, a large 
representation of old grads were on hand. 
They were invited to the stage and par- 
ticipated in several numbers with the pres- 
ent Club. 

Among the manv voung men present 
was Preston L. Peach, '03, now on leave 
from the Federated Malay States, where 
his duties are those of directing educa- 
tional work. 

The entire performance of the Club and 
Chorus was well received and highly com- 
mended. Harlan Randall, director, de- 
serves a great deal of praise for the splen- 
did accomplishments of the music group. 

Each vear on Alumni Day the Orchestra 
Club and Chorus generously give their 
services in an entertainment program for 
returning old grads. 

Washington County — Chairman — Ken- 
neth Spence, '27. 

College Park— L. G. Mathias, '23; Ed- 
die Semler. '22; J. C. Seibert, '08; 
M. D. Moore; Ardath Martin. Law — 
Senator Joseph D. Mish, '26; Charles F. 
Wagaman, '32; Robert McCauley. '10; 
David A. Wolfinger, '12; Sharpe D. Kar- 
per, '36; John Wagaman, '29. Medicine — 
R. B. Norment, '14; F. F. Lusby, '26; J. 
H. Wade, '95; J. R. Tobias, '26; L. H. 
Brumback, '20; J. H. Beachley, '26. 
Nursing — Emma B. Hoffmaster, '16. Phar- 
macy — Arthur C. Harbaugh, '22; Harry 
R. Rudy, "33; Fred Warrenfeltz, '24. 
Dentistry— C. Diehl, '18; W. G. Horst, 
'19; L. L. Watkins, '03; H. U. Yeater. '18. 

Wicomico County — Chairman — A. E. 
Williams, '14, LL.B. 

College Park — Marion G. Swanson, 
'38; J. W. Bates, '26; Sarah Tolson, '32; 
R. D. Mumford, '35; D. J. Ward, '32; 
Otis S. Twilley, '21; Charles W. Bennett. 
'22; J. P. Brown, '16. Law— Lewin C. 
Bailey. '13; W. C. Humphreys. '92. Phar- 
macy — Howard L. Gordy, '22. Medicine — 
J. M. Dick, '95; H. A. Barnes, '07; D. A. 
Fields, '24; R. M. Nock, '25; H. C. Tull. 
'00. Dentistry — Melvin R. Leonard, '37. 
Nursing — Murtyle Nock, '25. 

Worcester County — Chairman — A. A. 
Parker, '09, M.D. 

College Park — Lucy J. Walter; A. 
W. Parker, '08; Wm. H. Scott. '31; Eliz- 
abeth Mills, '34; W. H. Price. '22; Or- 
lande Harrison, '22; R. T. Grant, '34. 
Law — Godfrey Childs, '17; John I. San- 
ford, Jr., '35; W. H. Scott. '33. Phar- 
macy — William H. Clarke. '05. Medicine 
— R. L. Hall, '01; N. E. Sartorious, '04. 
Dentistry — Robert M. Given, '23. Nurs- 
ing—Edna S. Hales, '31. 



Maryland Alumni News i 



Old Line Athletic Contributions 



By W. H. ("Bill") HOTTEL: 




MARYLAND'S 1938-39 VARSITY BASKETBALL SQUAD 

Front Row (Regular Team) — Adam Bengoechea, forward; Pershing Mondorff, guard; George Knepley, guard; Eddie 

Johnson, center; George DeWitt, forward 
Back Row — Manager Simms, Gene Ochsenreiter, Dick Shaffer, Francis Beamer, Frank Dwyer (who has left squad), 

Bill Bryant, Arthur Rudy 



Terp Quint Feeling 
Lack of Reserves 

Maryland's basketball team, having won 
only two of its first five games, was going 
into the Navy battle at Annapolis on Jan- 
uary 11 when this was written. 

The Terps had beaten Clemson and 
Davidson and lost to Richmond in South- 
ern Conference games and also bowed to 
Penn and Army in their last two tilts, both 
away. 

Following the Navy clash at Annapolis, 
the Terps were to resume their Southern 
Conference competition with Duke, one 
of their hottest rivals, at College Park, Jan- 
uary 13. Then, with mid-year exams com- 
ing up, North Carolina, invading on Jan- 
(Continued on Page 9, Col. 2) 



Eight Are Striving 
For Relay Team 

Maryland's tracksters, under Coach 
Swede Eppley, are denting the board track 
at College Park dailv, with the main 
thought right now of developing a mile 
relay team for Millrose games in New 
York on Februarv 4 and other indoor af- 
fairs. 

Competition for a berth on the quartet 
is keen, with eight anxious to make places. 
Jim Kehoe, Alan Miller, Joe Peaslee and 
Mason Chronister are letter men who are 
striving for positions with Joe Murphy, 
Tom Fields, Bob Condon and Joe Devlin, 
all sophs, trying to break into the line-up. 

Murphy, who is a ten-second sprinter, 
(Continued on Page 9, Col. 3) 



Freshmen Basketers 
Tall and Husky 

Maryland has a tall and husky freshman 
basketball squad with the five starters av- 
eraging better than 6 feet 1 inch in height. 
They are Merle DuVall of Baltimore and 
Leon Vannais of Chevy Chase, Md., for- 
wards; Charley Bowers of Corning, N. Y., 
center; and Ashton Garrett and John 
Woodward, both of Rockville, Md., guards. 

This quint also averages more than 175 
pounds to the man, with Bowers at 202 
being the huskiest. 

Jim Wharton and Bernie Ulman of Bal- 
timore, Ed Wolfe of Smithsburg, Md., 
Phil Buddington of Hyattsville, Md., Carol 
Ilayden of Chevy Chase, Md., and Dick 
(Continued on Page 9, Col. 2) 



January, 1939 

Fistic Squad Shows 
Power in Trials 

Maryland's boxing team, which easily is 
the best the school has had with the pos 
sible exception of the Southern Conference 
title suad of 1937, was to make its debut 
against Duke at Durham on January 14th. 

For the first time in history of the sport 
at College Park, which is now in its ninth 
year, the Terps have two good men for 
each weight, with the exception of the 
heavy class. 

Maryland was the favorite for the match 
with Duke and then will have plenty of 
time to prepare for one it really is anxious 
to win, with Catholic University at Col- 
lege Park on January 28th. 

While the Cards have a good team, and 
won from Maryland last year, 4Vi to V/i, 
the Terps are likely to be the choice in 
this match also. 

Trials for the Terp team were held in 
public bouts in Ritchie Coliseum on Jan- 
uary 6th and the outlook was that the 
following would be used in the opener 
with Duke: 

120 — George Dorr, senior letter man, who 
was a regular last year. 

127 — Bob Bradley, another senior letter 
man, who is much improved over 
his previous form. 

135 — Benny Alperstein, Southern Confer- 
ence and National Collegiate 135- 
pound champion, fighting at his nor- 
mal weight, which should make him 
even better. Voted outstanding box- 
er in 1938 Conference tourney. 

145 — Nathan Askin, junior letter man, 
who also is excelling his 1938 form 
by a good margin. 

155 — Frank Cronin, Southern Conference 
440-yard dash man, who is making 
his debut as a boxer in sensational 
fashion. Promises to be co-star with 
Alperstein as team's topliners. 

165 — Newton Cox, another junior letter 
man, who has made outstanding 
progress. He was the ace of last Fri- 
day's tryouts. 

175 — Morton Steinbach, a junior making 
his varsity debut, but showing much 
promise. 

Heavy — Herman Raisin (195), senior 
fighting on varsity for first time, and 
still short of development. 

John Harn, 120; Charley Dorr, 127, and 
Kenneth Evans, 135, all sophs; Bob Lodge, 
165, and Israel Leites, 175, all made good 
showings in the tests. To the surprise of 
everyone, the long-armed Evans got in a 
couple solid blows to Alperstein's face. 



Terp Quint Feeling 
Lack of Reserves 

(Continued from Page 8, Col. 1) 
uary 20, will offer the only opposition until 
Virginia visits on the 28th. 

Maryland's great trouble this year, as 
was anticipated, is that it has no reserve 
stiength to speak of. The team is okay 
when Adam Bengoechea, George DeWitt, 
Eddie Johnson, George Knepley and Per- 
shing Mondorff, the regulars, are in the 
game, but they just can't go at full pace 
foi sixty minutes and combat the array of 
good basketers the rivals use. 

Just how bad off for reserve strength 
the Terps are is shown in the fact that in 
the first five games played the regulars 
have scored all but two of the points 
Maryland has made. Bill Rea got a basket 
in the Davidson contest, the third on the 
schedule. 

• 

Freshmen Basketers 
Tall and Husky 

Greer and Bob Porter, both of Washing- 
ton, also are fine prospects. 

These six also average 6 feet, 1 inch, 
with Hayden, who is 5 feet, 11 inches, 
being the shortest. This half-dozen is 
lighter, averaging 160 pounds. 

The squad doubtless gives Maryland the 
best freshman talent it ever has boasted. 
O 
ATHLETE IS PROM LEADER 
George Lawrence, Maryland ace foot- 
ball guard and lacrosse defense man, is 
chairman of the 1938 Junior Prom Com- 
mittee. The event will be held at the Wil- 
lard Hotel on January 26th. 
O 
RING COACH A GRANDDAD 
Lieut. -Col. Harvey (Heinie) Miller, 
head coach of the Terp boxers, is a grand- 
pa and his little granddaughter, Clay Keen 
Bernard, is the mascot of the ring team. 
The Terp mittmen call her "Butter- 
winkle." 

O 

DeWITT LEADING SCORER 

George DeWitt, sophomore forward, 
led the scoring for the first five varsity 
basketball games with 46 points; George 
Knepley, senior guard, was next with 42. 
Eddie Johnson, center, had 38; Adam Ben- 
goechea, forward, 31, and Pershing Mon- 
dorff, guard, 13. 

o 

DOBSON LIKED AS SPEAKER 

Frank Dobson, Maryland's head foot- 
ball coach, is in great demand as a speaker. 



Program Changed 
For Indoor Meet 

A couple of changes have been made by 
the University of Maryland and the Fifth 
Regiment of Maryland for their big joint 
meet in the latter 's spacious armory in 
Baltimore on March 11. 

It has been decided to have only open 
e\ents in the high hurdles and the pole 
vault, dropping them from the collegiate 
list and adding a half-mile event for the 
latter. 

It was found that they practically were 
duplications of entries in the events and 
that their consolidation also would shorten 
the program to its desired length. 

Special events which will again feature 
the program are the Governor's Mile, the 
Oriole 660 and Interscholastic Invitation 
660. Other events will be: 
INTERSCHOLASTIC — 70-yard sprint, 
1,000-yard run, high jump, mile relay 
races for high and prep schools, mile 
relay for Maryland Interscholastic As- 
sociation title and a half-mile county 
high school championship race. 
INTERCOLLEGIATE — 70-yard sprint. 
440-yard dash, half-mile run, one-mile 
run, one-mile relays and sprint medley 
relay for Mason-Dixon Conference title. 
A. A. U. INVITATION— 70-yard sprint 
handicap, 70-yard high hurdles, 1,000- 
yard run handicap, high jump, shot-put, 
two-mile miss-and-out, one-mile relays 
and pole vault starting with bar at 11 
feet. 
FIFTH REGIMENT — 70-yard sprint, 
660-yard run, equipment race, half-mile 
intercompany relay and half-mile inter- 
regiment championship relay. 

• 

Eight Are Striving 
For Relay Team 

and Devlin, who runs both the high and 
lew hurdles, are the only ones among the 
eight whose regular distance does not 
range from the quarter-mile up. 

Outside of the relay, Miller runs the 
quarter, Kehoe and Condon the half, Fields 
and Chronister the mile, and Peaslee the 
two miles. Dick Barnes will help Murphy 
with the sprints and Ed Miller, Southern 
Conference high-jump champ, and others 
also will be seen in the indoor meets. 

In all, more than twenty Terps are toil- 
ing, looking to squad representation in the 
Southern Conference games at Chapel 
Hill on February 26, the Catholic U. meet 
in Washington on March 4 and their own 
Maryland-Fifth Regiment Carnival in the 
latter's big armory in Baltimore on March 
11th. 



10 



Maryland Alumni News 



NEW INFIRMARY 




The addition to the Infirmary makes practically a new Infirmary. More 
beds have been provided and a newly equipped dispensary service. It is the 
first building to be completed under the new building program. 



tjrapevlne Oxews Ojbout c/kose ( oYe J\> 



Army — Former Cadet Major Ben. 
Shewbridge, '38, a graduate in Arts and 
Sciences, now is taking the one-year army 
training course under the Thompson Act. 
Ben is stationed at Fort Washington. 
O 

Quaker Oats — Washington represen- 
tative is Norwood Sothoron, '34, a mem- 
ber of Kappa Alpha and former Old Line 
gridiron star. Norwood won the Silvester 
Athletic Medal and the Citizenship Medal 
in his senior year. He was also president 
of his class. Norwood hails from Charlotte 

Hall, Maryland. 

O 

Teaching — Miss Edith Bell is teaching 

Home Economics at the Williamsport 

High School. 

O 

Radio — "Every Woman's Hour" over 
Station WFBR of Baltimore is conducted 
by Martha Ross Temple, '33. 

o 

Radio Singer — Wednesdays, at 2:30 
P. M., a sustaining program of N. B. C. 
over station WJZ, you can hear Bill John- 
son, '36, baritone, former University Glee 
Club star. Bill directs this program. 

He is a member of Sigma Phi Sigma and 
was quite active in student affairs. 
O 

Football — When the Old Line Terra- 
pins journeyed to Syracuse early in the sea- 
son, who should appear at the dressing- 
room door but G. W. Pinck, a fullback in 
the days of '04. Pinck is now located in 



now 



Syracuse. We certainly were delighted to 
see some of the old-timers again. Fortu- 
nately, Dr. E. N. Cory, a former football 
player just a few years after Pinck was 
with the team, was present, and the two 
of them had a big time reminiscing over 
old times of early football. 



Birth — In the previous issue the birth 
of a son to Mr. and Mrs. Robert Troth 
was noted. At that time we missed enter- 
ing the name of the new arrival, which 
is Robert Symons Troth. We are looking 
forward to his matriculation at the Uni- 
versity about 1956 and hope he will up- 
hold the football prowess of his grand- 
father, Dr. T. B. Symons, '02, who was 
a member of the football team in those 

da vs. 

o 

Married — Laurence Ray Bower, '34, 
and Miss Fern Royall of Silver Spring, 
Md., were married on August 3, 1938. 
Mrs. Bower is a graduate of Elmira Col- 
lege and Laurence is a junior in the Phil- 
adelphia College of Osteopathy. They re- 
side at 130 North 50th Street. 



Poultry — At Brunswick, Maryland, Vic- 
tor Wingate, '33, has started a chicken 
farm. His main production will be broilers. 
Victor is a well-known former member 
of the Terp lacrosse aces and boxing squad. 
O 

Birth — Mr. and Mrs. Warren Tydings 
are the proud parents of a baby girl born 



C. T. Bailey, '22, 
Becomes Marine Major 

Among the recent names recommended 
for promotion in the United States Marine 
Corps was that of C. T. "Zeke" Bailey, '22, 
former gridiron star for the Old Liners. 
Bailey was a captain in the Marines and 
was recommended for promotion to the 
rank of major. The recommendation was 
approved by President Roosevelt. 

"Zeke" is a member of Kappa Alpha 
Fraternity and his home is in Bladens- 
burg. 

• 

Wins Dental 
Fellowship 

A coveted honor was recently won by 
Dr. Eugene Lyons, '38, a gold medal grad- 
uate of the Dental School. In an exam- 
ination comprising the entire United 
States, the Mavo Clinic gives one dental 
fellowship every six months. He is the 
son of a Maryland graduate, Dr. Eugene 
O. Lyons, '15. His sister, Elnora Lyons, 
now is a senior in the College of Home 
Economics. 



September 8th, 1938. Mrs. Tydings was 
formerly Anna Marie Quirk, '36, a mem- 
bei of Alpha Omicron Pi. Warren, '35, 
was former president of the Student Gov- 
ernment Association and a member of 
Alpha Gamma Rho. The Tydings are re- 
siding in Washington, D. C. 



Sulphur — P. M. Ambrose, '31, is now 
with the Bureau of Mines doing research 
work in Chemistry and Metallurgy. One 
of his principal problems is with the re- 
covery of sulphur from smelter smoke. It 
seems that in the West large smelters 
give off smoke which kills a lot of sur- 
rounding vegetation. It has been his re- 
search problem to find a process to extract 
sulphur from this smoke and make it into 
a marketable product. 

Ambrose married Mary Koons, '31, a 
member of Tri-Delta, and on October 22 
their young son, Robert Edwin, celebrated 
his first birthday. They now live in Col- 
lege Park. 

O 

Telephone — Bob Newman, '37, is in 
the Traffic department of the Chesapeake 
and Potomac Telephone Company. In ad- 
dition, Bob is studying for a Master's de- 
gree in Business Administration. 



January, 1939 



11 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 




Presents 

NINO MARTINI 

of the 
METROPOLITAN OPERA 

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1939 

RITCHIE COLISEUM 
COLLEGE PARK 

V 



.50, $1.00, $ .75 



Nino Martini 



All Seates Reserved — $2.00, I 
(Tax Included) 

A 

For Reservations and Tickets, write 

G. F. POLLOCK, College Park 

Phone: Greenwood 3800 

or 

W. M. HILLEGEIST, Lombard and Greene Streets 

Baltimore, Md. — Phone: PLaza 1100 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND * FIFTH REGIMENT 

Announce 

ANNUAL INVITATION INDOOR TRACK MEET 
SATURDAY, MARCH 11, 1939 

FIFTH REGIMENT ARMORY 
BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 

V 
Presenting 

NINE A. A. U. INVITATION EVENTS 

SIX COLLEGIATE EVENTS 

EIGHT SCHOLASTIC EVENTS 

More Than Two Hundred Athletes Will Participate 



A 



Reserved Seats — $1.65, $1.10 (Tax Included) 



General Admission — $ .75 



Write 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, COLLEGE PARK 



FIFTH REGIMENT ARMORY, BALTIMORE. MD. 




MY NEW YE 



RE SOLUTION 




FOR MORE PLEASURE 




ALUMNI 
NEWS 



FEBRUARY 
1939 



o 



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pa 

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>> w 

J- 3 

T. P. 
O E 

O 
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//*" 



I 




•*■*«, 





What Is TELEVISION? 



JUST another gadget- -another form of enter- 
tainment? No. It represents another step 
forward in man's mastery of time and space. It 
will enable us, for the first time, to see beyond 
the horizon. And, in addition, it will create new 
jobs for today and tomorrow. 

New products make new jobs. That's been the 
history of radio, of the automobile, of electric- 
refrigerators and movie cameras and air condi- 
tioning. It's been the history of hundreds of 
other devices and services that have come from 
the research laboratories of industry. That's why, 
in the last 50 years, the number of factory jobs 
in this country has doubled. And why, in addi- 
tion, millions of other jobs have been created 



— selling, servicing, and obtaining raw materials 
for the new products. 

It often takes years of costly, painstaking 
research to develop a laboratory experiment into 
a useful product ready for the public to enjoy. 
This has been the case with television. As long 
ago as 1930, Dr. E. F. W. Alexanderson and other 
General Electric engineers demonstrated televi- 
sion to a theatre audience in Schenectady, N. Y. 
When, after years of labor, television is ready for 
the public, it will bring to the people of America a 
new product that will add to their comfort and 
enjoyment, raise their living standards, and 
create new employment for todav and tomorrow. 



G-E research and engineering have saved the public /row ten to one hundred dollars 
jor every dollar they have earned for General Electric 

GENERAL % ELECTRIC 

NEW YORK — VISIT THE "HOUSE OF MAGIC" AT THE FAIRS — SAN FRANCISCO 






Volume X 



MARYLAND ALUMNI NEWS, FEBRUARY, 1939 



Number 9 



Alu 



mm 



Association — University of Maryland 

Founded in 1892 



OFFICERS FOR 1938- 39 

C. Walter Cole, '21, President 
Towson, Md. 
Charles W. Sylvester, '08, Vice-President 
G. F. Pollock, '23, Secretary-Treasurer 



Baltimore, Md. 
College Park, Md. 






ALUMNI BOARD 
(Note — The officers named above are also members of the Alumni Board) 

Reuben Brigham, '08 Arts and Sciences 

Charles V. Koons, '29 Engineering 

P. W. Chichester, '20 Education 

John A. Silkman, '35 Agriculture 

Ruth Miles, '31 Home Economics 

MEMBERS AT LARGE 

Esther Hughes Lee, '33 Women's Representative 

J. Donald Kieffer, '30 Men's Representative 



G. F. Pollock, '23, Editor 

Marvla\d Alumni News, issued monthly by the University of Maryland Alumni Associa- 
tion at College Park, Md., as second-class matter under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Annual Alumni Association dues are $2.00. One year's subscription to Alumni News, 
50 cents. 



GROUP LEADERS 

Allegany County: E. Brooke Whiting, '98, President; Dr. Joseph Franklin, '21, Secretary, 

Cumberland, Md. 
Baltimore County: C. Walter Cole, '21, President; H. B. Derrick, '17, Secretary, Towson, Md. 
Baltimore City: Chester Tawney, '31, President, 4022 Roland Avenue; E. Gordon Ham- 
mond, '34, Secretary, 1023 W. Barre Street, Baltimore, Md. 
Caroline County: George W. Clendaniel, '20, President, Denton, Md.; Dr. Maurice A. Brackett, 

'21, Treasurer, Denton, Md.; Mrs. George W. Clendaniel, '21, Secretary, Denton, Md. 
Harford County: W. B. Munnikhuvsen, '14, President; H. M. Carroll, '20, Secretary, Bel 

Air, Md. 
Frederick County: J. Homer Remsberg, '18, President; Henry R. Shoemaker, '17, Secretary, 

Frederick, Md. 
Montgomery County: Lawrence G. Smoot, '18, President, Kensington, Md.; Mary Fisher, '36, 

Secretary, Rockville, Md. 
New York City: Donald Kieffer, '30, President, 195 Broadwav; Sarah Morris, '25, Secretary, 

140 E. 63rd Street, New York City. 
Philadelphia: A. Moulton McNutt, '06, President, 413 Cooper Street, Camden, N. J.: J. P. 

Mudd, '07, Secretary, 174 Manheim Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Pittsburgh: E. Minor Wenner, '27, President, 1111 Gladys Avenue; Dr. A. A. Krieger, '32, 

Secretary Highland Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Washington, D. C: J. Douglas Wallop, '19, President, 6139 N. Dakota Avenue, N.W.; 

Charles V. Koons, '29. Secretary, 419 Fourth Street, N.E., Washington. 
Washington County: Hon. Henry Holzapfel, Jr., '93, President, Hagcrstown, Md.; L. G. 

Mathias, '23, Secretary, Hagerstown, Md. 



"M" CLUB OFFICERS AND BOARD MEMBERS 



Donald H. Adams, '28 President 

A. K. Besley, '23 Vice-President 



Dr. E. N. Cory, '09 Secretary-Treas. 

W. B. Maslin, '09 Historian 



REPRESENTATIVES 



G. F. Pollock, '23 Baseball 

H. B. Shipley, '14 Basketball 

Stewart McCaw, '35 Boxing 

James Stevens, '19 Lacrosse 

Lewis W. Thomas, '28 Track 



James Busick, '35 Tennis 

Charles Remsberg, '26 Cross Country 

W. C. Supplee, '26 Football 

Dr. E. B. Friedenwald, '03 \ 
Dr. A. W. Valentine, '04 ] 



At Large 



Cover Picture 

Is of the front doorwav to Margaret 
Brent Hall, the first girls' dormitory built on 
the University of Maryland Campus. Here 
more than one hundred girls can be ac- 
commodated. The dorm was filled bevond 
capacity the first year it was opened. Many 
will reminisce about the moving days from 
the Old Y Hut up the hill to their new- 
abode. The building faces south with a 
wide terrace in front. Soon this will be a 
popular place for basking in the warm 
spring sunshine. 



Fellow Alumni 

Last Fall the Alumni Board appointed 
a committee to wait upon President Bvrd 
relative to the dedication of the Rossburg 
Inn as an Alumni headquarters. As vou 
are probably aware, this building is now 
being restored to its original colonial state. 
It is the one historical landmark on the 
campus and, from all appearances, will be 
most attractive and interesting when com- 
pleted. All graduates of the institution, 
when they recall their college days, asso- 
ciate themselves with this building. It is 
traditional with respect to the Alumni, 
and it is only natural and, it seems, proper 
that it should be dedicated to the traditions 
of the University as associated with its 
graduates. 

I am pleased to announce that as a re- 
sult of the aforementioned conference. 
President Bvrd has approved the idea of 
dedicating the Rossburg Inn to the tradi- 
tions of the University as associated with 
the Alumni, which will be exemplified by 
the erection of a suitable plaque at a 
prominent place in or on the building. 
Also, one room of the building will be 
set aside exclusively for Alumni purposes. 

I could state the general plans of the 
building as related by President Bvrd, but 
a statement by him, together with a pic- 
ture of the proposed building as finished, 
will appear as a special item of the March 
issue of the News. 

In furtherance of this plan, it was agreed 
that Alumni Day, to be held in May, shall 
be the occasion of dedicating the Ross- 
burg Inn as above outlined. The next 
issue of the News will announce the exact 
date, and as this will be an important event 
in the life of our Association and of its 
members, we hope vou will now make your 
arrangements to be present with your fam- 
ily and friends. 

Very truly yours, 

C. Walter Cole, '21, 

President. 



Maryland Alumni New 



Snapshots From Charter Day Celebratior 




February. 19-59 



Gov. Herbert R. O'Conor, '20, Guest 

Of Honor At Charter Day Celebration 



ON Friday, January 20th, the Alumni, 
faculty and friends of the University, 
in a genuine spirit of fellowship, assembled 
at the Lord Baltimore Hotel in Baltimore 
and commemorated another year in the 
one hundred and thirty-two years of edu- 
cational service to tire people of Maryland. 
His Excellency, Herbert R. O'Conor, '20, 
Governor of Maryland, was the guest of 
honor. In his remarks he praised his Alma 
Mater and said he had confidence that the 
University would continue its efficient and 
useful service to the people of the State. 
The Honorable William P. Cole, '10, 
Maryland Representative in Congress, per- 
formed the honors of Toastmaster. Col. 
Frank W. Weed, '03, M.D., was the hon- 
orary chairman. 

Nurses Celebrate 

The guest speaker of the occasion was 
Mr. Charles P. McCormick, president of 
the internationally known McCormick & 
Co. of Baltimore. Mrs. John Paul Trov, 
'17, past president of the Nurses Alumnae 
Association, presented a brief history in 
commemoration of the fiftieth anniversary 
of the founding of the School of Nursing. 

Nice Among Guests 

Dr. H. C. Byrd, '08, president of the 
University, in his usual friendly wav pre- 
sented the distinguished guests and extend- 
ed a word of greeting. Among the many 



Oldest Alumnus 
Present 

Among the distinguished people present 
was Dr. W. H. Marsh, 76, M.D., now in 
his eighty eighth year. Dr. Marsh has been 
present for each of the last three celebra- 
tions. He is a native of Calvert County 
and for more than a half century was a 
practicing physician in that county. 

Retired now and living in Baltimore, 
Di. Marsh seldom misses a meeting of the 
Medical Alumni. When the oyster roasts 
are held he is always on hand. 

Dr. Marsh was at the table with Dean 
Rowland at the banquet, a picture of 
which is on the opposite page. 



distinguished guests were, former Gov- 
ernor of Maryland, the Honorable Harry 
\\ . Nice, '98; Senator RadclifTe. '03; Con- 
gressmen Goklsborough, '01, D'Alesandro, 
Byron and Kennedy. Presidents of many 
of the affiliated organizations were among 
the guests. 

Dancing 

Entertainment was provided by Miss 
Jeanette Bittner and Professor Harlan Ran- 
dall. Mr. Albert K. Rovvsell, a noted hu- 
morist, gave a very entertaining talk. At 
the conclusion of the dinner group singing 
aroused the crowd to the spirit of the oc- 
casion. Following the program the ballroom 
was quickly cleared and dancing continued 
until 1.30 A. M. 

Old Pals Meet 

It was another evening of old pals meet- 
ing again to celebrate the progress of their 
Alma Mater. Annually this celebration will 



Alumni Presidents 
Among Leaders 

Among those people who are leaders in 
the affairs of the University we find the 
Alumni presidents taking an active inter- 
est. They gave untiringly their efforts in 
making the Charter Day a most success- 
ful celebration. Dr. Charles F. Blake, '93, 
president of the Medical School; Miss 
Bessie L. Maston, '20, president of the 
Nurses; John E. Magers, '14, president of 
the Lawyers; Dr. David B. Getz, '13, pres- 
ident of the Pharmacists, and C. Walter 
Cole, '21, president of the College Park 
Alumni, were present for the celebration. 

Dr. Byrd, in his presentation of distin- 
guished guests, did not fail to present the 
presidents of the Alumni Associations who 
arc his ardent supporters in the program 
for a greater University. 

Married — Mary B. Crisp, '37, married 
Mr. William C. Ward of Baltimore on 
December 2 7 , last. Mary is a member of 
Kappa Delta and Mortar Board, was ac- 
tive in the Women's Athletic Association 
and Student Government. The newlyweds 
reside at 4026 Belle Avenue, Baltimore. 



be carried on where the Alumni, faculty 
and friends of the University are united 
into one common unified purpose, the de- 
velopment of the University of Maryland 
as a progressive aid to the people of 
Maryland. 

Dr. Black Chairman 

This year we are indebted to Dr. Frank 
L. Black, '04, a grad of the School of 
Pharmacy, and Mrs. Page Edmunds, '05, 
a graduate of the School of Nursing, for 
their genuine service as chairman and vice- 
chairman of the general committee in 
making the celebration a success. To these 
two Alumni and their corp of fellow work- 
ers we owe an expression of thanks for 
their concerted efforts. 



Accident Kept 

Dr. Bell, '19, Away 

Because of an accident Dr. Arthur I. 
Bell, '19, president of the Dental Alumni 
Association, was unable to attend the 
Charter Day Banquet. Dr. Bell is an ear- 
nest leader of Alumni interest and enthu- 
siasm in the University. For two years he 
has been elected president of the Dental 
Group. 

We are glad to report that he has re- 
covered from the accident and has returned 
to his office in the Medical Arts Building. 



Dancing 

The grand ball following the banquet 
was the inviting feature for many of the 
younger graduates. This was quite evident 
by the number who were present for the 
final dance. The Townsmen of Baltimore 
were in good form for the occasion. 

Part of the program to arouse the in- 
terest of the seniors and to acquaint them 
with the activities of the Alumni, each 
Association president invited the president 
of the Senior Class as a guest to the ban- 
quet. The idea met with much favor among 
the presidents of the Association and seems 
tc be helping stimulate more Alumni in- 
terest. 






Maryland Alumni News 



Congressman Goldsborough, '01, 

To Become Associate Justice 



For the fourth time in history a Marv- 
lander lias been nominated to become As- 
sociate Justice of the District Court of the 
United States for the District of Columbia. 
The Honorable T. Alan Goldsborough. 
'01, LL.B., received the recommendation 
of President Roosevelt for this honor and 
has been confirmed. 

fudge Goldsborough is a native of the 
Eastern Shore and has been a public serv- 
ant for more than fortv vears. He was first 
State's Attorney for Caroline Countv. Then 
thiough the regular channels of political 
progress, he became a Maryland Repre 
sentative in Congress, the position he has 
held for eighteen vears. 

He was an ardent supporter of the New- 
Deal and considered one of the President's 
closest friends. 

The name Goldsborough has been prom- 
inent on the shore of Maryland for more 
than two hundred years. His ancestors 
served in the First Continental Congress. 

Judge Goldsborough was admitted to 
the Bar soon after graduation and began 
practicing law immediately with consid- 
erable earnestness. He is a member of the 
Maryland Bar Association and has been a 
member of the United States Supreme 
Court Bar since 1914. 

In Congress he became the ranking 
member of the Banking and Currency 
Commission. Congratulations, Judge! 
• 

Richard Sliger, '95, 
Dies 

At his home in Grantsvillc, Md., the 
Honorable Richard Sliger, '95, died as a 
result of paralysis and pneumonia. He was 
a well known banker and insurance man 
of Garrett County. Mr. Sliger got his start 
as a bookkeeper in a bank and rose to the 
position of cashier. After banking for 
twenty-five vears, he resigned and became 
State manager for the Sun Life Insurance 
Company. His civic services have been 
numerous, among them he was president 
of the Board of Education. He was a 
member of the Episcopal Church, the 
Masonic Lodge and was a Shriner for many 
years. Mr. Sliger is survived by his widow, 
a son, one sister and two brothers. 

On this occasion the News takes this 
opportunity to extend condolence to the 
family. 




Judge T. Alan Goldsborough 

Marylanders With Gulf 
Research 

In the Kevstone State several Maryland 
Alumni can be found with the Gulf Re- 
search and Development Corporation. Dr. 
W. A. Home, Ph.D., '38, chemist; B. A. 
(Reds) O'Neill, '36, now in the Engi- 
neering Division; and Oscar Spencer, '32, 
a member of the Tennis Squad in '31 and 
'3D. To get in touch with any of these fel- 
lows write care Dr. Home, 359 California 
Avenue, Oakmont, Pennsylvania. 



"Tiger" Flowers Among 
The Fishes 

Traveling about the northern section of 
the Eastern Seaboard is the occupation of 
Dick Flowers, a former dining hall mogul. 
He is with the Bureau of Fisheries on a re 
search fellowship for the Aquacide Com 
pany of Washington. His assignments have 
taken him to Newfoundland, Nova Scotia, 
St. Pierre, Coffin Island and many other 
well known fishing ports. Dick was recently 
on the campus, where he spent several 
days in the Bureau of Fisheries laboratories, 
lie now is on his way back to the Grand 
Banks of Newfoundland. Dick is a niem- 
bei of Kappa Alpha fraternity and a for- 
mer member of the boxing squad. 



Dr. R. A. Pearson 
Succumbs 

As a result of a heart attack. Dr. R. A. 
Pearson, former President of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland, died at his home in Hy- 
attsville, February 5, 1939. He served the 
University as President from 1926 to 1935, 
during which time he was chairman of the 
executive committee of the Land Grant 
Colleges. Following his resignation from 
the University, he became a specialist in 
the Farm Security Administration of the 
United States Department of Agriculture. 

Dr. Pearson is a graduate of Cornell 
and earned for himself quite a reputation 
as a specialist in agriculture sciences. He 
has served as a teacher in agriculture, as 
an administrator wrote several bulletins, 
and was special assistant to the Secretary 
of Agriculture during the World War. 

He is survived by his widow and one 
daughter. 

The News takes this opportunity to ex- 
tend sincere condolence to the bereaved 
family. 

New Jersey — Just got a card from Rev. 

Walter P. Plumley, '29, who now is living 

at 501 Green Street, Haddon Heights. 

New Jersev. He reminds his fellow Alumni 

that he is just three miles off the New 

York-Atlantic City Route Number 30. 

"When visting the New York Fair, to 

Plumley's vou must repair," writes friend 

Walter. 

O 

Radio — When listening to the radio 
station WJSV in the morning about 8 or 
8.30, you will hear Robert Baker, '38, for 
mer editor of the Diamondbaclc. He is as 
sitting Arch MacDonald on the Magic- 
Carpet. Hold 'em. Bob. 



Housemother — The Dean of College 

Park housemothers is Mrs. Mary Cassard, 

of Kappa Alpha. In January Mrs. Cassard 

completed the tenth year milestone. A 

dinner was held in her honor at which 

time she was presented with an appropri 

ate gift. 

O 

Aviation — John Simpson, '35, has cn- 
tered the United States Aviation School. 
It was John's first love and it is reasonably 
certain he will make a good pilot, judging 
from the way he drove his car about the 
campus. He was also that reckless guard 
on the Terp's football eleven and caused 
main a fleet back a downfall. 



February, 1 939 



CONGRATULATIONS 




Dr. H. C. Bvrd, '08 



To Dr. H. C. Bvrd: 

Upon the occasion of your birthday, it 
is my privilege and pleasure to extend to 
you the greetings of the Alumni. We wish 
for you many more years of fine health to 
enable you to carry on the able leadership 
brought to the University through vour 
elevation to the Presidency. 

As graduates of the University, we are 
vitally interested in its welfare and prog- 
ress. So much so, in fact, that we hope the 
administrative body of the University will 
see fit to call upon us as a group for as- 
sistance and cooperation. 

Elsewhere in the News, wc announce 
the encouraging result of the conference 
held with vou relative to the dedication 
of the Rossburg Inn to the traditions and 
use of the Alumni. As then discussed and 
agreed, our next Alumni Day, to be held 
in May, will be an auspicious occasion 
upon which formal dedicatory exercises 
might be held, which will cause an un- 
precedented number of Alumni to re- 
turn to the campus at that time. 

Again reassuring you of our earnest de- 
sire to aid you in vour worthy efforts, and 
with every wish for your continued good 
health and happiness, I am. 

Very sincerely vours, 

C. \Y \t.i in Cole, 
President of flic Alumni 
Association of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 



Charles Linhardt, '12, 
Elected Commodore 

As a result of the election of the Bal- 
timore Yacht Club, Charles Linhardt, '12. 
has been elected Commodore for 1939. 
So it is Commodore Linhardt for 1939 and 
maybe for evermore. 

Charley is a grad in Engineering and has 
been head of the Automatic Light Com 
pany of Baltimore for many years. He- 
tales an active interest in civic affairs. He 
has served as Lieutenant Governor of the 
Sixth District for Kiwanis International. 
His interest in the Alumni and athletic- 
affairs at the University is dear to his heart 
and each year Charley presents a Mary- 
land ring to the boy from Maryland who 
has been an outstanding athlete and rep- 
resentative of the University. 

Charley resides in Baltimore. 

National Association 
Honors Dr. Byrd 

"It is our pleasure to honor one of our 
most eminent members. Dr. II. C. Bvrd 
of the University of Maryland, the only 
one of this Association to attain the high 
honor of becoming president of a major 
educational institution," said IIarrv A. 
Stuhldreher, president of the National 
Collegiate Football Coaches' Association, 
at the annual meeting in December. Dr. 
Bvrd was presented with a bronze trophy, 
an exact replica of an official football, 
emblematic of life-time membership in the 
Association 

Mayo, '04, Makes Trophy 

The trophy was casted and made by the 
Gorham Company of Providence, R. I., of 
which Edmund C. Mayo, '04, is president 
and personal friend of Dr. Bvrd's. The 
trophy is so realistic that several remarked 
they felt like giving it a kick. 

Player To Presidenr 

In presenting the award Mr. Stuhldreher 
pictured Dr. Byrd as a man who probably 
had more to do with the athletic develop- 
ment in one institution than any other 
member of the association. He rose from 
a player, through the field of Professor of 
English, Athletic Commentator, Football 
Coach, Director of Athletics. Assistant to 
the President, Vice-President, and now is 
President of his Alma Mater. 

Dr. Bvrd, in his remarks, praised the 
splendid work and teachings of the foot 
ball coaches today. Men who probabh 
have more to do with shaping the character 
of young men than any other profession. 



To My Fellow Alumni 

University of Maryland 
College Park, Mankind. 
Dear Fellow Ai umni: 

I have always attended, whenever pos- 
sible, and have looked forward to the 
meetings of the Alumni Association, of 
which group I am happy to be an active 
member. 

Mrs. Tydings and I accepted with pleas 
urc the invitation of the .Association to be 
its guests at the Charter Day Banquet held 
at the Lord Baltimore Hotel. January 20th. 
and it was a source of real regret that, at 
the last moment, circumstances arose mak- 
ing it impossible for us to go to Baltimore 
that evening. When we found wc could 




not go, wc sent a wire of regret and ap- 
preciated Dr. Bvrd announcing the reason 
for our absence. 

These dinners are always very enjoyable 
and I look forward to the opportunity of 
meeting all the fellows. I am sorrv that we 
could not be with you this year, but hope- 
that when another year rolls around we 
will be able to join with you in that year's 
celebration. 

With kindest regards to all the mem- 
bers. I am 

Sincerely and cordially, 
M. E. Tydings. 
• 

Boxing Team — When the boxing team 
journeyed to North Carolina for a match 
with the Tarheels at Chapel Hill, the) 
were met by several enthusiastic Alumni 
R II. Ruffner, 'OS, head of the Animal 
Husbandry Department of North Carolina 
State College, met the team at Raleigh. 
Ik was accompanied by F. M. Haig, '18, 
ami John Weslej Webster, '35, and Louis 
Ashman, '34. All are connected with the 
North Carolina State College at Raleigh. 



Maryland Alumni News 



Old Line Athletic Contributions 



By W. H. ("Bill") HOTTEL: 



MARYLAND'S UNDEFEATED BOXING SQUAD 

mmmaamam 




Front Row — Bob Bradley, 127; Bennv Alperstein, 135; George Dorr, 120; Nathan Askin, 145; Frank Cronin, 155; 

Newton Cox, 165. 

Back Row ■ — Lieut. Col. Harvey Miller, head coach; Israel Leities, 175; Morton Steinbach, 175; Herman Raisin, 

heavy; Bob Lodge, 175; Capt. William Maglin, assistant coach. 



Ring Team In Three Ties 
And One Win 

Maryland's boxing team had an odd rec- 
ord as it prepared for the fifth match of 
the season with Rutgers on "All-University 
Night" in Ritchie Coliseum. 

Rutgers was defeated by 6Vz to \Yi. 

The Terps started out by taking Duke 
in the opener, 5 to 3, and then fought four 
successive 4-all draws with Catholic Uni- 
versitv, Virginia and North Carolina, the 
last two mentioned in a foreign ring. 

Bcnnv Alperstein, national collegiate 
champ, battling in the 135-pound divi- 
sion, and Frank Cronin, the track ace who 
has proved the sensation of the fistic team 
in the 155-pound class, have been the stars 
of the Terp aggregation. 

However, Alperstein lost a close and 
questionable decision in the Duke match, 
while Cronin has gone through his five 
bouts beating the aces of two rival teams, 
Joe Bunsa of Catholic U. and Truman 
Southall of Virginia. 

George Dorr, 120; Bob Bradley, 127; 



Nathan Askin, 145; Newton Cox, 165; 
Mortv Steinbach, 175, and Herman Rais- 
in, heavy, have been the other Maryland 
regulars. 

All are entered in the Southern Con- 
ference tournev at Columbia, S. C, Feb- 
ruary 24-25, except Raisin. 
• 

The Basketers Earn Place 
In Tourney 

The Terp basketball team, hitting at a 
faster pace than was expected at the out- 
set of the season, has assured itself a place 
in the Southern Conference title tournev 
to be held at Raleigh, N. C, March 2, 
3 and 4. 

With only one Conference game re- 
maining, with V. M. I. "All-University 
Night," the Terps have won seven of ten 
games played in the loop and are holding 
down second place in the standing, with 
a powerful Wake Forest team as the leader. 
V. M. I. was trimmed, 53 to 35. 

Maryland has played in eighteen games 
(Continued on Page 10) 



Nine Terps Are Sent To 
Title Games 

Maryland was to send fourteen men to 
compete in nine events in the Southern 
Conference indoor track meet, scheduled 
for Woollen Gym at the University of 
North Carolina on February 25 and was 
expected to figure prominently in the 
point-gathering. 

Fddie Miller, who won the high jump 
last year with a leap of 6 feet 3 A inch, was 
to defend, as was the relay quartet in the 
mile race. Miller did 6 feet \Vi inches in 
the recent Penn A. C. games in Philly, 
but did not place. 

Jim Kehoe, who won the half-mile in 
the Penn A. C. meet in 1:58.1 over a poor 
track, and Tom Fields, who scored at two 
miles in Philly, were to race in these events 
at Chapel Hill. Fields also won in the 
mile. 

Joe Pcaslec, the outdoor two mile Con- 
ference champ, was to try to add the in- 
door honors to his list. 

(Continued on Page JO) 



February, 1939 




A Thrill of 1938 — Here is Glenn Cunningham winning the Governor's Mile in the 1938 Maryland-Fifth Regi- 
ment Games, with Archie San Romani second. Mason Chronister of Maryland third, and Gene Venzke 
fourth. Cunningham and his rivals were cheered by a capacity crowd that thoroughly enjoyed the meet. 

"BIG NAMES" TO BE ARMORY GAMES FEATURE 



M 



ANY of the nation's leading track 
aces, including Don Lash, king of 
two-milers, arc expected to compete in 
the Maryland-Fifth Regiment Games in 
the big Baltimore Armory on the night 
o f March 11. 

\\ hile the names of the topliners who 
definitely will compete were not available 
when this was written, it is safe to say 
that there will be enough to please the 
fans. 

Northern and southern colleges, includ- 
ing Penn, Penn State, Navy, Duke, North 
Carolina, Virginia, Washington and Lee, 
Georgetown, Catholic U. and others have 
announced their intention of sending 
their best athletes. 

Terps Will Seek Laurels 

Maryland, of course, will make its bid 
and will have fifteen or more varsity men 
and a number of freshman tracksters in 
action. 

Last year Glenn Cunningham, the 
world's greatest milcr. packed them in and 
the meet officials are determined to have 
a "name" this year that will be as attrac- 
tive. 

That the meet definitely has been 
placed on the track "map" is illustrated by 



U. of M.-5th Regt. Tourney 
Plans Announced 

o 
the inquiries from high-ranking athletes, 
sonic who have competed and are anxious 
to return, and others who are eager to 
show their wares for the first time. 
Four Special Events 

The Governor's Mile and the Oriole 660 
again will be featured and the two-mile A. 
A. U. invitation is expected to present a 
field in which national notables will be 
conspicuous. The Scholastic 660 also is 
sure to add a high spot. 

The card, in addition to features men- 
tioned, is: 

Scholastic Events — 1,000-yard run, high 
jump, high school open mile, one-mile 
relay, prep school mile relay, Maryland 
Interseholastic Association mile relav, 
Maryland county high school half-mile 
relay. 

Intercollegiate Events — ■ 70-vard sprint, 
440-yard dash, 880-vard run, mile run. 
mile relays to be classified by committee, 
freshman half-mile relay, Mason-Dixon 
Conference half-mile relay. 

A. A. U. Invitation Events — 70-vard 
sprint, handicap; 70-vard high hurdles, 



1,000-vard run, handicap; mile relay, 16- 
pound shotput, high jump, pole vault 
starting at 10 feet 6 inches. 

Fifth Regiment Events — 70-yard sprint, 
600-yard run, equipment race, half-mile 
intercompany relay. 

National Guard Event — Half-mile re- 
lav, intcrrcgimental championship. 
Col. Hancock Is Chairman 

Col. Frank A. Hancock of the Fifth 
Regiment again is chairman of the Games 
Committee, with Gearv Epplev, Univer- 
sity of Maryland athletic director, as vice- 
chairman. 

Other members of the committee are: 

Fifth Regiment — Lieut. Col. Harry C. 
Ruhl, Capt. William T. Terry, treasurer; 
Capt. Edward J. Heng, Lieut. Roger S. 
Wniteford, secretary; Lieut. Hiram D. 
Ives and Lieut. Allan L. Feldman. 

University of Maryland — Dr. William 
B. Kemp, Dr. Ernest' N. Cory, Dr. Wil- 
liam C. Supplee, Frank M. Dobson, Geo. 
F Pollock and William H. Hottel. 

Leaders of the meet are determined that 
the affair shall be run off with speed and 
without confusion and are making verv 
definite plans to see that this is done. 
(Continued on Page 10) 



10 



Maryland Alumni News 



(grapevine C/Yews OjboLit cJkose \ We JV 



now 



Mantilla, '32, Visits 
Campus 

From Ecuador by way of New York to 
San Francisco was the route of Jorge Man- 
tilla, '32. so he could visit the University. 
lie was on his way to the World's Fair 
i:i San Francisco, where he will be in 
charge of the Ecuador exhibit. Jorge ex- 
tends a welcome to all Maryland grads to 
visit the exhibit of Ecuador and to look 
him up. 

After leaving the University in 1932, 
Mantilla returned to Ecuador and became 
a member of the staff of his father's paper. 
EJ Comercio. In addition he became a 
theater manager. Not long after his return 
to Ecuador he married Senorita Aiva Mos- 
quera, the niece of the President of Ecua- 
dor. 

Mantilla was a delegate from Ecuador to 
the Lima Conference. On his return from 
Lima he met the wife of Luis Ganoza, '31, 
who is located in Trujillo, Peru, as a plan- 
tation owner. Mantilla is a member of 
Delta Sigma Phi and his address i.i Quito, 

Ecuador. 

O 

Ecuador 

Another former Maryland student from 

Ecuador is Galo Pla/a, '31, who now is 

Minister of War in that country. lie was 

promoted from the rank of Major of 

Quito. 



South America 

In Colombia the De la Torre brothers, 
'31, Carlos and Mario, can be found do- 
ing engineering work for the Gulf Oil 

Company. 

o 

Peru 
In Peru, Luis Aubry, '31, is manager 
of the drv dock at Callao. 



Steamships — Secretary to the District 
Manager of the Wilson Steamship Line of 
Washington is June Eleanor W'ilcoxon, 
'3 3. June is a member of Kappa Kappa 

Gamma. 

o 

Personnel — Sarah Louise Short, '34, 
also an M.S. graduate in personnel study 
from Syracuse University, now is person- 
nel assistant with the Social Security Board 
of the Government. Sue is a member of 
Alpha Omicron Pi and Phi Kappa Phi. 



Jorge Mantilla and Family 

Accounting — Up in Wilmington, Del- 
aware. Fenton Wilcox, '33, is in the ac- 
counting department of the DuPont Co. 



Vocational — 'I he lusl graduate of the 
newly devised course in Vocational Edu- 
cation will be Carl Brode, a member of 

Alpha Tan Omega. 

O 

Medicine — Dr. Arthur G. Barrett, '96, 
M.D., has moved his offices to the Green- 
vvay Apartments in Baltimore. Dr. Barrett, 
a specialist in surgery, is a member of the 
American Medical Association. 
O 

Law — Among the students now attend- 
ing the College Park schools is Ruth E. 
Long, the daughter of Mr. Curtis W. 
Long. '10. LL.B., of Salisurv, Md. Mr. 
Long is a practicing attorney. 
o 

Popcorn — For the parties there now is 
prepared a partv popcorn. The sales man- 
ager for this area is Robert L. Haydon, Jr., 
'33, of Hyattsvillc. Anyone desiring to try 
the new popcorn, call Bob at Dupont 2336. 



Old Line Athletic Contributions 



The Basketers Earn Place 
In Tourney 

(Concluded from Page 8) 
as this is written and has captured eleven 
of them. 

The Tcrps will wind up their home sea- 
son bv entertaining Washington College 
on February 24 and thus will have plentv 
of time to prepare for the Conference 
tourney. 

Maryland's record is remarkable when its 
talent is assayed. George Knepley, all 
Southern guard, and George DeW'itt, soph 
forward, are outstanding: Eddie Johnson, 
the center, is a good basketer, but little 
Adam Bengoechea and Pershing Mondorff, 
the other two regulars, are onlv average 
and the reserve strength is almost nil, with 
the exception of Bill Rea. 

DeW'itt was setting the pace in scoring 
for the first eighteen games with 191 
points, with Knepley next with 174. 
e 

Nine Terps Are Sent To 
Title Games 

(Concluded from Page 8) 
Joe Murphy, a soph sprinter, and Alan 
Miller, quarter niiler, were others on the 
Terp team who appeared hard to beat. 

Francis Keimev, third in the outdoor 
broad jump last spring, was a likelv point- 
getter in his specialty. 
Those entered: 
70-Yard Dash— Joe Murphy, Alan Mil- 
ler and Francis Kennev. 
440 Yard Dash — Man Miller, Vernon Mil- 
ler. 
Half Mile — James Kehoe, Robert Condon. 
Mile — Thomas Fields, Mason Chronister. 
Two Miles — Thomas Fields, Joe Pcaslce 
and Roy Skipton. 



Hurdles, Low and High — Logan Schutz. 

High Jump — Eddie Miller, Francis Morris. 

Broad Jump — Miller, Morris and John 
Beers. 

Relay to be chosen from — Alan Miller, 
James Kehoe, Joe Murphy, 
Bob Condon, Thomas Fields, 
Mason Chronister, Vernon 
Miller, Joe Pcaslce and Eddie 
Miller. 

• 

Plans Announced For 
Tourney 

(Concluded from Page 9) 

Even the mget officials will be kept off 
the floor, an inset space in the stands be- 
ing arranged for them at the finish line for 
the running events. Press arrangements 
call for the writer to be in the balcony on 
the west end of the armory, where thev 
may look into the finish lines of both the 
sprint and distance races. 

Track Is Moved Southward 

The quarter-mile track also will be 
moved farther toward the south side of 
the armorv so that occupants of all seats in 
the north and south balconies mav be able 
to clearlv watch the competition. 

There will be scats for approximately 
4,000 under the present arrangements, 
and chairs may be added to take care of 
several hundred more. 

There will be 1,636 scats on the floor 
on the North street side, 864 of which 
will be choice locations at or near the fin- 
ish line, which will be at the top price of 
SL65. There will be 1,854 seats on the 
floor on the - north and south stands and 
600 seats on the north balcony, at $1.10 
each. The 75-cent general admission seats 
will be in the south balcony, where the 
extra chairs will be placed if needed. 



FEBRUARY. 1939 



11 



Army-Maryland 
Boxing Meet 

SATURDAY 

MARCH A 
19 39 *T 

RITCHIE 

COLISEUM 

COLLEGE PARK 



> 



FIRST 
BOUT 

8.00 P. M. 



All Seats Reserved 



75c 



Write athletic office for reservations. Add eighteen cents 

to the order if you desire your tickets to he sent by 

registered mail. 



Annual 
U. of M. - 5™ Regiment 

INDOOR 
TRACK 
MEET 

Saturday, March 11th 

5 th REGIMENT 

ARMORY 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

Preliminaries, 7 P. M.; Final Events, 8 P. M. 

— APPROXIMATELY 30 EVENTS — 

• 
(Sec Story on Sport Page, This Issue) 

• 

PRICES: RESERVED SEATS, $1.65-$1.10 

GENERAL ADMISSION, 75 CENTS 

Write Athletic Office, College Park 
or 5tb Regiment Armory, Baltimore 



CUT ON THIS LINE 



lave You Joined Your Fellow Alumni? 

=IF NOT, FILL OUT AND RETURN THIS BLANK NOW 



Fellow Alumni: 

wish to be a contributing lncinbcr of 
z University of Maryland Alumni As- 

Bation, and am enclosing the usual 
lunt of S2.00 for the year 1938-1939, 
this fifty cents is for one year's sub- 
iption to the Alumni News. 



Name 


Class 


Occupation 


Address 






Married? To whom 




Children 


Business address 




Title 









C 



hesterfields give me 
more pleasure than any 
cigarette I ever smoked 



A HAPPY COMBINATION OF THE WORLDS BEST TOBACCOS 




MARCH 
1939 



ALUMNI 
NEWS 



C 

r- 

o 
Cj 

o 



p-i 



C Pi 

o 





Home Economics Faculty 



THE COLLEGE OF 

Home Economics 

The College oe Home Economics is 
the newest college in the University, 
having been organized in 1918 with one di- 
vision and an enrollment of five students. 
Progressing through the years under Dean 
M. Marie Mount, the College now has three 
divisions and an enrollment of more than 
two hundred students. The objective of the 
College is to provide training for those inter- 
ested in becoming teachers, dietitians, res- 
taurant and cafe managers, demonstrators, 



home-makers, textile specialists, designers, 
and buyers of clothing in department stores. 
Several new instructors were added to the 
staff this year, making possible the introduc- 
tion of courses which have broadened and 
strengthened the curricula. One innovation 
was a new curriculum of practical arts which 
is designed for students interested in creative, 
selective and promotional positions in the 
fields of clothing and art. A phase of the 
work provides opportunity for professional 
experience in retail stores. Other new courses 
are advanced food preparation and interior 
decoration, crafts, merchandise display, and 
textile microscopy. 



ALUMNI DAY 



FRIDAY, JUNE 2, 1939 



COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



SPECIAL FIVE-YEAR CLASS REUNIONS, 1889- 1894- 1899-1904-1909-1914- 1919 1924-1929-1934. 
New program features will be presented. Overnight accommodations in dormitory will be provided for 

returning grads. Grand Ball to climax events. 



,vm&s&* 



Volume X 



MARYLAND ALUMNI NEWS, MARCH, 1939 



Number 10 



Alumni Association — University of Maryland 

Founded in 1892 



OFFICERS FOR 1938 - 39 

C. Walter Cole, '21, President 
Towson, Md. 

Charles W. Sylvester, '08, Vice-President Baltimore, Md. 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Secretary-Treasurer College Park, Md. 



Cover Picture 

Picture is a typical daily scene between 
classes. The students are going to and 
from the Arts and Science Building, fre- 
quently referred to as Shoemaker Hall. 
More than 1,000 students go to over 300 
classes in this building in a single day. 
For the benefit of those who graduated 
before the completion of this building, 
it is located on the hill north of the En- 
gineering Building and directly in front 
of Gearncaux Hall and faces east. 



ALUMNI BOARD 
(Note — The officers named above are also members of the Alumni Board) 

Reuben Brigham, '08 Arts and Sciences 

Charles V. Koons, '29 Engineering == 

P. W. Chichester, '20 Education 

John a. Silkman, '35 Agriculture Employment Opportunities 

Ruth Miles, '31 Home Economics 

MEMBERS AT LARGE 

Esther Hughes Lee, '33 Women's Representative 

J. Donald Kieffer, '30 Men's Representative 



G. F. Pollock, '23, Editor 

Maryland Alumni News, issued monthly by the University of Maryland Alumni Associa- 
tion at College Park, Md., as second-class matter under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Annual Alumni Association dues are $2.00. One year's subscription to Alumni News, 
50 cents. 

GROUP LEADERS 

Allegany County: E. Brooke Whiting, '98, President; Dr. Joseph Franklin, '21, Secretary, 

Cumberland, Md. 
Baltimore County: C. Walter Cole, '21, President; H. B. Derrick, '17, Secretary, Towson, Md. 
Baltimore City: Chester Tawney, '31, President, 4022 Roland Avenue; E. Gordon Ham- 
mond, '34, Secretary, 1023 W. Barre Street, Baltimore, Md. 
Caroline County: George W. Clendaniel, '20, President, Denton, Md.; Dr. Maurice A. Brackett, 

'21, Treasurer, Denton, Md.; Mrs. George W. Clendaniel, '21, Secretary, Denton, Md. 
Harford County: W. B. Munnikhuysen, '14, President; H. M. Carroll, '20, Secretary, Bel 

Air, Md. 
Frederick County: J. Homer Remsberg, '18, President; Henry R. Shoemaker, '17, Secretary, 

Frederick, Md. 
Montgomery County: Lawrence G. Smoot, '18, President, Kensington, Md.; Mary Fisher, '36, 

Secretary, Rockville, Md. 
New York City: Donald Kieffer, '30, President, 195 Broadway; Sarah Morris, '25, Secretary, 

140 E. 63rd Street, New York City. 
Philadelphia: A. Moulton McNutt, '06, President, 413 Cooper Street, Camden, N. J.; J. P. 

Mudd, '07, Secretary, 174 Manheim Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Pittsburgh: E. Minor Wenner, '27, President, 1111 Gladys Avenue; Dr. A. A. Krieger, '32, 

Secretary Highland Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Washington, D. C: J. Douglas Wallop, '19, President, 6139 N. Dakota Avenue, N.W.; 

Charles V. Koons, '29, Secretary, 419 Fourth Street, N.E., Washington. 
Washington County: Hon. Henry Holzapfel, Jr., '93, President, Hagerstown, Md.; L. G. 

Mathias, '23, Secretary, Hagerstown, Md. 



"M" CLUB OFFICERS AND BOARD MEMBERS 



Donald H. Adams, '28 President 

A. K. Besley, '23 Vice-President 



Dr. E. N. Cory, '09 Secretary-Treas. 

W. B. Maslin, '09 Historian 



REPRESENTATIVES 



G. F. Pollock, '23 Baseball 

H. B. Shipley, '14 Basketball 

Stewart McCaw, '35 Boxing 

James Stevens, '19 Lacrosse 

Lewis W. Thomas, '28 Track 



James Busick, '35 Tennis 

Charles Remsberg, '26 Cross Country 

W. C. Supplee, '26 Football 

Dr. E. B. Friedenwald, '03 ) 
Dr. A. W. Valentine, '04 j 



At Large 



Occasionally inquiries come into the 
Alumni Office for those Alumni who have 
put a few years of experience behind them. 
Any Alumnus who thinks he might be in- 
terested in some of these offers should 
keep in touch with the Alumni Office. 

There arc at present, some inquiries 
from the New York World's Fair for 
those who have graduated in the last four 
or five years. Any interested Alumnus get 
in touch with the Alumni Office at once. 

There is also an opening with a dairy 
company for a field man and a laboratory 
technician. 

A gas companv reccntlv made inquiries 
about locating two engineers for openings 
in the company. 



Twenty-Fifth Anniversary 
For The Class Of '14 

When the classes assemble June 2 at 
College Park for Alumni Day, the boys of 
'14 are going to put on a special Twenty 
fifth Year Reunion. They boast that they 
will show the others how it is done. 

Frank S. Hoffecker, the class president, 
was a real leader in his clay. He was cap- 
tain of the football and baseball team in 
his senior year, also winning the star for 
excellence in those sports. Under such 
leadership the class should have a real re- 
union. 

Mark the day, Friday, June 2, at Col- 
lege Park. 




Maryland Day Observed; 

Governor O'Conor Speaks 



Governor H. R. O'Conor, '20 

Rev. Henry Whiting, '31, 
Accomplishes Aim 

Probably one of the most accomplished 
young clergymen in the vicinity of Wash- 
ington is Rev. Henry Whiting, '31, former 
president of the Student Government. 
Starting from scratch more than four years 
age he has developed and established the 
Christ Lutheran Church in Bethesda. 
Through his tenacious efforts and with 
the help of his loyal followers, they have 
bought and remodeled a Victorian home 
in Bethesda into an attractive church and 
parsonage. 

Mr. Walter Snapp, a member of the 
congregation, was the donor of the house 
and ground and the congregation in one 
month's time raised the necessary remod- 
eling fund. All of which was the result of 
Henry's active leadership and organization. 

In college Henry was a student leader, 
having attained the high honor of presi- 
dent of the Student Government, head of 
the R. O. T. C. unit and many other stu- 
dent activities. He was awarded the II. C. 
Byrd Medal for typifying the model citi- 
zen and active student leadership. His 
leadership in college has been carried on in 
his civic life, where he has taken an active 
interest in youth and community move- 
ment. His accomplishment speaks highly 
of his ability. He is married and with his 
family resides in the church parsonage. 



His Excellency Herbert R. O'Conor, 
'20, Governor of Maryland, was the prin- 
cipal speaker at the Maryland Day exer- 
cises commemorating the founding of 
Maryland, held in the Ritchie Coliseum at 
College Park. More than 5,000 people 
jammed the coliseum for most colorful 
exercises. 

The Governor urged that the principles 
of the Free State founders, a government 
to serve the people, not a people to serve 
the government, should be emphasized 
todav. 

"The onlv justifiable reason for the ex- 
istence of government," he told the stu- 
dents, "is to put into effect the reasoned 
"ishes of the governed.'' 

Honorable Lansdale G. Sassccr, Mary- 
land Representative in Congress, also made 
a brief talk on Southern Maryland history. 

Dr. II. C. Byrd, President of the Uni- 
versity, presided, and the Very Reverend 
Leonard Walsh, O.F.M., gave the invo- 
cation. 

Special episodes depicting the founding 
of Maryland were presented by the Mont- 



gomery Blair High School and the An 
napolis High School. The former pre- 
sented the planting of the Cross at St. 
Mary's City, and the latter, Proclaiming 
the Establishment of the Province of 
Maryland at St. Mary's City. Misses May 
Louise Wood, '28, and Mrs. Verna Metcalf 
directed the Montgomery Blair presenta- 
tion, and Misses Marian Gardner, Elizabeth 
Davis and Man- Wilgard the Annapolis 
High School episode. 

A solo by Miss Dorothy Seegcr, a distin- 
guished singer, was an outstanding feature 
of the program. 

Following the Governor's speech, the or- 
chestra played "There's a Girl in the Heart 
of Maryland" as Miss Elaine McClayton, 
senior coed, from Baltimore, presented Mrs. 
O'Conor with a beautiful bouquet of yellow 
roses on behalf of the student body of the 
University. Immediately following this pre- 
sentation the entire audience joined in sing- 
ing "The Star-Spangled Banner." 

The day's program began with a regi- 
mental review of the R. O. T. C. before His 
Excellency Governor O'Conor and General 
Parsons. 



- 



Re-elected Head Of 
Kappa Kappa Gamma 

At the recent Province Convention of 
kappa Kappa Gamma, which was held in 
College Park, Frances Wolfe, '25, one of 
the early members of the local Kappa 
group, was re-elected Province president. 

Frances was an honor graduate and has 
always been an active Alumnae in the 
Sorority. This is the second term as head 
of this Province of Kappa for her. 

Frances resides in Forrest Glen, Md. 

• 

Carr And Don Orchestra 

A bovhood desire has finally culminated 
in the orchestra combination of Carr Van 
Sickler, '27, and Donald Shook, '28. They 
low are to be known as Carr and Don 
of the Madrillon Cafe of Washington. 
Both are piano artists and a two-piano 
combination is the feature of their or- 
chestra. Back in high school and on 
through their college days, they looked 
forward to this opportunity. They hope 
their old friends will come to see them 
and are also anxious to meet many new 
Maryland Alumni. 



Modern Language Plans 
For Spring Social 

Under the leadership of Dr. A. E. 
Zuckcr, head of the Modern Language 
Department, plans for a Spring Social, to 
be held April 26, are under way. The pro- 
gram calls for a play to be presented by 
the students in the department, which 
will be followed bv a social get-together. 

All Alumni of the Department are cor- 
dially invited to attend. Please write Dr. 
Zucker in advance, if possible. 

Pharmacy Alumni Held 
Midwinter Reunion 

The Alumni Association of the Phar- 
macy School, headed by Dr. David Getz, 
'13, of Bel Air, Maryland, held their mid- 
winter supper and dance February 16 at the 
Maryland Casualty Club in Baltimore. 

Cooperating with the association was 
the Traveler Auxiliary of the Maryland 
Pharmaceutical Association. A delightful 
occasion, as usual, was held and a delicious 
supper served. It was one of the biggest 
Alumni reunions of the year. 



Maryland Alumni News 



Alumni Board Held 
Interesting Meeting 

\ meeting of the Alumni Board was 
recently held at College Park, at which 
time several matters of interest and im- 
portance to the Alumni were discussed. 
Alumni Day was the first to receive the 
thoughts of your representatives. In a de- 
sire to have Alumni Day associated with 
the Commencement Week program, 
which seems to be the traditional time for 
an Alumni reunion, the Board decided on 
Friday, June 2. It was felt that the Alumni 
wanted one day in the year when they 
could return to the campus and actually 
see what the University is doing in the 
various departments. An athletic contest 
is not the sole attraction, but the oppor- 
tunity to visit with old friends and remi- 
nisce about old times. Added to this desire 
the members of your Board asked Presi- 
dent Byrd, who attended the meeting, if 
it was possible to provide overnight ac- 
commodations in the dormitories for re- 
turning Old Grads. "Gladly," said Mr. 

Byrd. 

Rossbourg Inn 

On this day an unusual program will be 
provided, including the next subject of 
concern to all former students, the dedi- 
cation of the Rossbourg Inn. Following 
the dedication ceremonies an Alumni Ban- 
quet will be held in the University Dining 
Hall and all those attending the banquet 
will be invited guests of the University 
to the June Ball. The invitations will be 
limited to seniors, faculty and those at- 
tending the banquet. 

Dave Brigham, '37 Doing 
Radio Work In Iowa 

Dave Brigham, '37, went West follow- 
ing his graduation and is now doing the 
publicity work for the State Triple-A Com- 
mittee in Iowa. The work includes prepar- 
ing and presenting radio broadcasts and 
issuing news releases about the Agricul- 
tural Conservation Committee program. 
Most important part of the program is, 
naturally, "corn." However, some wheat, 
vegetables and dairv farming come in for 
their share of publicity. 

It seems from Dave's title, Informa- 
tional Assistant, that he is giving out to 
the West information on the Eastern way 
of success. But Dave says, "I am certainly 
learning a lot and like my job." 

Another thing has happened in his life. 
On December 28 he married Miss Gladys 
Beall and they arc living in Des Moines, 
Iowa. 

March, 1939 



At the annual meeting President Walter 
Cole will present to the Association his 
appointments of five trustees to handle 
the Alumni Fund. The fund is his propo- 
sal and he wishes to sec it get a good start. 
Amendments 

At the annual meeting of the Associa- 
tion the Board will present an amendment 
to the Constitution for more representa- 
tion on the Alumni Board. It is expected 
that the following will be asked for: an- 
other vice-president, two more members- 
at large (one more for men and one for 
women), and a representative of the Col- 
lege of Commerce. In the case of the ad- 
ditional vice-president it was felt, that in- 
asmuch as the vice-president by tradition 
becomes president, would give him a bet- 
ter knowledge of the working Association. 
The Board voted also to have the imme- 
diate retiring president remain a member 
of the Board, ex-officio, for the next year 
so that the Association can profit by his 
experiences. 

Practically the entire Board was present, 
with Dr. Byrd, Prof. Eppley and past pres- 
ident Zalesak as guests of the Board. Your 
representative felt that a very profitable 
meeting was held. 

Mayo, 04, Visits 
Campus On Way South 

Edmund C. Mayo, '04, of Providence, 
R. I., visited the campus a few weeks ago, 
enroute to North Carolina on a vacation. 
On his sight-seeing tour he was partic- 
ularly interested in looking over the Engi- 
neering plant, of which he is a graduate. 
One of the old engines with which he 
used to work caught his attention and he 
commented about his college days. 

Mr. Mayo is president of the Gorham 
Silver Manufacturing Company of Rhode 
Island. 

Ann Matthews, '29, 
In New York 

Extension officials tell us that while at- 
tending the Northeastern States Extension 
Conference in New York last week they 
met Ann Matthews of the Class of '29. 
Ann is the Cornell University Nutrition 
Specialist in Junior Extension 4 -H Club 
work. From all accounts she not only en- 
joys her work but is making good. She 
says that her brother "Gump" of Class of 
'28 is now located in Rochester and is 
employed by the Household Finance Cor- 
poration. Ann is a member of Kappa 
Kappa Gamma. 



Medical Graduate 
Promoted To Rear Admiral 

Benjamin Henry Dorsey, born in Ellicott 
City, Maryland, September 13, 1878; grad- 
uated in June, 1897, with A.B. degree from 
Rose Hill College, Maryland, and from 
the University of Maryland Medical School 
ir: 1901 as president of his class. Interned 
in the University Hospital, Baltimore, from 
graduation until shortly before entering 
the Medical Corps of the Navy, March 3, 
1903, as assistant surgeon (Lieutenant, 
Junior Grade). Passing through the va- 
rious grades he was made Captain in the 
Medical Corps, U. S. Navy, in June, 1924; 
was recently approved by the President of 
the United States for promotion to Rear 
Admiral Medical Corps, U. S. Navy, and 
will move his number April 1, 1939. 
With Marines 

He has been on duty aboard various 
ships of the Navy in the Atlantic, South 
Amerca, European, Pacific, and Asiatic 
waters; served with the U. S. Marines for 
over two years in Panama during the con- 
struction of the Canal; served with the 
Marines in Nicaraugua's Revolution of 
1912; landed with the Marines at Vera 
Cruz, Mexico, April, 1914; served with 
the Marines in Santo Domingo. (His 
service with the Marines, was that of a 
Medical officer.) Attended course of in- 
struction at Naval Medical School, Wash- 
ington, D. C, 1903-1904. Has also served 
at the following U. S. Naval Hospitals: 
Puget Sound, Washington; Portsmouth, 
N. H.; Boston, Mass., and Newport, R. I. 
World War 

At the beginning of the World War 
Admiral Dorsey was on duty in the office 
of the Surgeon General of the Navy; later 
was executive Medical Officer of the U. S. 
Naval Hospital Ship "Mercy". Prior to 
his promotion he was commanding officer 
of the U. S. Naval Dispensary, Navy De- 
partment, Washington, D. C. Before com- 
ing to Washington was Commanding Offi- 
cei of the U. S. Naval Hospital, Newport, 
Rhode Island. 

He is a member of the Association of 
Military Surgeons and a Fellow of the 
American College of Surgeons. 

Admiral Dorsey has the congratulations 
of his fellow Alumni and their best wishes 
for continued success. 



Missouri — A member of the class of 
'24, Gerald L. Glass, is out in Jefferson 
Barracks, Mo., with the Veterans' Ad- 
ministration Facility. Recently Gerald's 
annual letter arrived. 



5 












Harry D. Watts, '04 



C. Walter Cole, '21 



Munroe Leaf, '28 



Major Harry, King Cole and Ferdinand Leaf 

Will Head New York Group Meeting 



Munroe Leaf, '28, creator of "Ferdi- 
nand, the Bull," and C. Walter (King) 
Cole, '21, president of the Maryland Alum- 
ni Association, will be the guests and 
speakers at the Fifth Annual Spring Din- 
ner of the Maryland Alumni Club of 
New York on April 15, at the Shelton Ho- 
tel. Every Marylander is well aware of the 
outstanding success of Munroe Leaf in 
his chosen field and cognizant of Walter 
Cole's able administration of the Alumni 
Association during the past year. With 
King Cole and Ferdinand the Bull on the 
same program, Marylanders and their 
guests may look forward to an evening that 
will be unique as well as enjoyable. 

Harry (Major Harry) D. Watts, '04, 
prominent construction executive, will be 
the toastmaster; and those who have been 
fortunate enough to have previously heard 
Harry will be looking forward to some 
great stories. Dr. H. C. Byrd, Dean Geary 
Eppley and G. Findlay Pollock have been 
invited to represent the University and it 
is expected that the}- will make the trek 
from College Park to New York to be the 
Metropolitan Alumni at the cocktail party 
and dinner. 



Engaged — Kitty Pollard, Alpha Omicron 
Pi, senior, has the ring from Brady Smith, 
'36, now attending Medical School. Both 
arc from Baltimore. 



Election Of Officers 

The only business to be conducted will 
be the election of officers for the ensuing 
year. The Nominating Committee is head- 
ed by Fred L. Rakeman and includes Ly- 
man D. Oberlin and Edward Mullen. 

Dr. Lewis V. Haves will be Chairman 
of the Reception Committee and will be 
assisted by Mrs. Patricia Wolfe Cassel- 
man, Mrs. Pat Brossman Parrish, James E. 
Dingman, Dr. Allen W. Thornton, Ham- 
ilton Howard, Gordon Kessler and Wil- 
liam J. Kinnamon. 

A cocktail party at 6:30 will precede 
the dinner at 7:30. Both affairs will be 
• 

For a Worthy Cause 

On April 16, at 8:30 P. M., the an- 
nual Card Party and Dance, sponsored by 
the Women's Auxiliary Board of the Uni- 
versity Hospital, will be held at the Alca- 
zar, in Baltimore. The party is a philan- 
thropic endeavor for the benefit of the 
Free Clinics in the University Hospital. 

The Auxiliary Board deserves a great 
deal of credit for the splendid work they 
arc doing and should have the support of 
every loyal Alumnus. Any contributions 
will be gladly received and The Alumni 
Office will see they are properly delivered. 

Come to the party if you possibly can, 
as every one has a good time. Prizes of 
many kinds are awarded. 



held in the Pompeiian Room of the Shel- 
ton Hotel, which is located on Lexington 
Avenue at 49th Street. Dress, of course, is 
optional. Reservations at SI. 50 per person 
should be sent bv Alumni for themselves 
and their guests to Sarah E. Morris, Sec- 
retary, at 310 East 44th Street, New York 
City. 

Aviation — The American Aviation 
Magazine has the services of Herbert L. 
Smith, Jr., '37, a member of Phi Delta 
Theta. Herbie will be remembered for his 
great work on the Diamondback. 

O 

Shades — Fred Marshall, '32, a mem- 
ber of Alpha Gamma Rho, is reported 
with the Legion Shade people of Wash- 
ington. He was formerly an officer in the 
CCC. Fred was a member of the Rifle 

Team . 

O 

Forestry — Inspector for the Forestry Di- 
vision of the United States Department of 
Agriculture is Jimmy Brown, '35, now lo- 
cated at Duke University, where he got 
his M.S. and Ph.D. in Forestry. He is a 
member of Alpha Zeta. 
O 

Engaged — - It is rumored that Alice 
Ellen Walker, '38, now a special nurse in 
the Infirmary, has an engagement ring. 



Maryland Alumni News 



Old Line Riflers 
Continue to Win 

\\ itli the Old Liners' tradition always 
as their guiding spirit, the Rifle Team has 
about finished another season in a blaze 
if glory. Out of nine shoulder matches 
jhej won eight, losing only to the Navy. 
In Postal matches the team won thirty 
and lost four. 

They are defending champions of the 
R. O. T. C. Corps Area Championship. 
I distinction they have held for the past 
tlnee years. The Hearst R. O. T. C. tro- 
pin' has been at Maryland for two years and 
another win means permanent possession. 
Another two-year championship held bv 
the team has been the National N. R. A. 
Intercollegiate. 

Even though they arc defending in 
those mentioned thev have one champion 
ship under their belt — the District of 
Columbia Intercollegiate. Team Captain 
Warren Davis has been high man so far 
but is closelv pressed by George Meeks, 
last year's top man and second All-Amer- 
ica n. i 

This year a new school record has been 
str by the team, with a score of 1412 out 
of a possible 1500. 



President Byrd Hears 
From Puerto Rico Group 

The University of Maryland Alumni 
Group of Puerto Rico sent Dr. II. C. 
Bvrd greetings and best wishes for the 
success of the Alma Mater. Dr. Cofta 
Mandry, a graduate of the Medical School, 
is president of the group. Several meetings 
arc held each year and the boys in Puerto 
Rico never fail to let someone in the Uni- 
versity hear from them. 



Dr. Boucher, '96 
Succumbs 

Dr. Richard P. Boucher, M.D., '96, 
died at his home in Providence, Rhode 
Island, on Christmas morning. He was a 
native of Connecticut. He had practiced 
medicine for fortv-two years. He was a 
member of the Providence Medical Asso- 
ciation and the Rhode Island Medical So- 
ciety, and the American Medical Societv. 
|He held the rank of Major in the Old 
Second Regiment of Rhode Island. 

He is survived by his widow, a son and 
hree daughters. 



I 



Qrapevine News About ^hose We Know 



Birth — Word reaches us from Abing- 
ton, Pennsylvania, that Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 
liam C. Warfield, '36, have a son, William 
Lynn, born September 10. Mrs. Warfield 
was the former Mary Lvnn Mclntire, a 
member of Tri Delt, who hails from Oak- 
land, Mankind. "Bill," a local product, 
and a grad in the College of Agriculture, 
now is with the Burpee Seed Company of 
Philadelphia and was recently promoted 
head of the Vegetable Research Depart 
ment. 

The Warfields are living in Abington, 
Pennsylvania, at 10 Wvnnwood Road. 
Thev were recently campus visitors. 
O 

Health — In the State Department of 
Health in Baltimore one finds Fred Sid- 
ing, '36, a member of Lambda Chi Alpha. 
O 

Real Estate — A former star basketcr and 
baseballer in the person of Robert Gaylor, 
'31, now is in the real estate business in 
Indian Springs Village, outside of Silver 
Spring, Montgomery County, Md. Bob 
is a member of Kappa Alpha Fraternity. 

March, 1939 



Teaching — Tome School at Port De- 
posit, Maryland, has Sarah Jack, '35, as 
one of their Home Economics teachers. 
O 

Air Conditioning — When in need of 
air conditioning services think of J. Han- 
son Mitchell, '98, now representing the 
Fox Furnace Company. His offices are lo- 
cated at 100 West 22nd Street, Baltimore, 

Maryland. 



Queens College — From the columns of 
the Xew York Times we learn that Betty 
Jyne Kemper, '37, has been appointed 
"Clerical Assistant in Queens College" of 
New York City. Betty is studying for her 
master's degree at Columbia. 

Thanks to Nell Wilson of Washington 
fcr this news and best wishes to Betty for 
continued success. 

O 

Married — Thomas W. Wilson, '34, and 
Miss Nancy Webber of Pittsburgh, Pa., 
will marry April the 14th. Thomas re- 
ceived his degree in Engineering. The 
ncwlvweds are to reside in Washington. 



Former Tracksters 
Present For Big Meet 

When the Maryland-Fifth Regiment 
Annual Indoor Track Meet was held at 
the Fifth Regiment Armory in Baltimore 
on March 11, many former Old Line 
tracksters were present. 

Probably the outstanding event was the 
winning of the "M" Club Trophy by the 
relay team of Frederick High School, 
coached by Warren Evans, '37, a former 
Old Line relax star and quarter -milcr. This 
was Warren's first exhibition of his track 
coaching. 

Evans' teammates in the sprint medley 
relay, Earl Widmyer, Bob Archer, and 
Coleman Headley, helped to cheer his 
high school boys on to victory. 

Other well known Terp cinder track 
stars were present: Milo Sonen, '37; Cor- 
nelius Cronin, '35; Ken Belt, '37; Knoeky 
Thomas, '28; Earl Zulick. '2"; Bill Sup- 
piee, '25; E. N. Cory, '09, and Bill Kemp. 
'12. 

Dr. II. C. Byrd, '08, a former holder of 
several track records at the Old Line 
school, was an honorary referee. 

Professor Geary Eppley, 'IS, a former 
trackman, was vice general chairman of 
the meet and his first assistant was the 
well-known Roger Whiteford, '28, who 
was secretary of the meet; in fact, Roger 
was just about the "Mogul." 

The meet was quite a success and should 

be bigger and better each year. 

e 

Married — Waverlv James Wheeler, '38, 
and Miss Patricia C. Fitzpatrick of Silver 
Spring, Maryland, are married. Waverly 
is the well-known Old Line diamond star 
of the past three years, 
o 

Going South — It is rumored that Elga 
Jarboe, '36, may be going south, if she 
has not already done so, to Myrtle Beach, 
South Carolina, to live. Well, it may be 
she has some life interest there. 
O 

South America — Two Americans, born 
in South America, are applying for admis- 
sion to the University in 1958 and '60. 
They arc Harry A. Jarvis, Jr., now 3 years 
old, and Joan Gail Jarvis, born December 
20, 1938, the son and daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Harry A. Jarvis. Harry '30, a 
member of A. T. O., is with the Compana 
Nativa dc Petroleos, located in Buenos 
Aires. He married Miss Lillian Clarkson 
of England in 1934 and came to the States 
on their honeymoon. 

They now reside in Campana F. C. 
C. A., Argentina, South America. 



Old Line All Stars for 1939 Indoor Season 




Left to Right — Alan Miller and Mason Chronister, Track; Eddie Johnson and George DeWitt, Basket- 
ball; Lin Kehoe, Track; Newton Cox, Boxing; George Knepley, Basketball; Frank Cronin and Benny 
Alperstein, Boxing; Tommy Fields, Track; Joe Murphy was absent when the picture was taken. 



BOXERS GAIN CONFERENCE CROWN; 

TOSSERS, TRACKSTERS RUNNERS-UP 



Winning the Southern Conference box- 
ing championship and finishing as runners- 
up in both the basketball tourney and the 
track meet, Maryland athletes had an in- 
door season of which thev justly may be 
proud. 

With small and none too experienced 
squads in all three of the sports, a lot of 
credit must go to Heinie Miller, Burton 
Shipley and Geary Eppley, who handled 
the boxers, basketers and tracksters, re- 
spectively. Capt. Bill Maglin and Jack Fa- 
ber gave Miller and Shipley a lot of val- 
uable help. 

Maryland placed only three men in the 
finals of the Southern Conference boxing: 
Benny Alperstein, 135; Frank Cronin, 155, 
and Newton Cox, 165, and all of them had 
to win to give the Terps the needed 15 
points to nose out North Carolina, which 
scored 14. 

Two Go To Nationals 

Alperstein, who has won two national 
collegiate titles, and Cronin, have entered 
title tourney at Madison on March 31 in 
an attempt to add to their laurels. 

George Dorr, 120; Bob Bradley, 127; 
Nathan Askin, 145; Morton Steinbach, 
175, and Herman Raisin were the other 
letter winners who helped the Terps to 
an unbeaten season in six dual meets, the 



climax of which was a victory over Army, 
1938 and 1939 Eastern Intercollegiate 
champion. 

Cronin was the season's collegiate mar- 
vel. Track star and holder of the South- 
ern Conference outdoor record of 48.3 
for the quarter, he laced on boxing gloves 
for the first time last November. He proved 
a fistic natural, winning all six of his dual 
meet bouts and taking the three needed 
to earn the Conference crown. He never 
even was close to defeat. 

Basketers Deserve Credit 

Maryland's basketball squad probably 
made a more remarkable fight than the 
boxers, considering that five men had to 
carry the brunt during a tough regular 
season and in the tourney. George Knep- 
ley, a great senior guard and one of the 
best ever to plav for the Terps; George 
De Witt, a soph, who topped the scoring 
with 227 points for the regular season; 
Eddie Johnson, outstanding senior center, 
all of whom were chosen for the first all- 
Conference quint after the tourney; Persh- 
ing Mondorff and Little Adam Bengoe- 
chea did the bulk of the work, with Bill 
Rea as the only experienced reserve. Fran- 
cis Beamer, Dick Shaffer and Gene Och- 
senreitcr, who completed the squad, played 
enough to get their letters. 



Going into the tourney with 13 wins 
in 21 starts, the Terps trimmed Richmond, 
47 to 32, and North Carolina State, 53 
to 29, to reach the final. They were bat- 
tling Clemson, which they had defeated 
in the regular season, on even terms in 
the final until De Witt was lost through 
the personal foul route after four minutes 
of the second half. Losing one of its big 
cogs, a tired Maryland team was unable 
to hold up and lost out, 27 to 39. 
Tracksters Gain Laurels 

Maryland's tracksters won honors in the 
Penn A. C. meet in Philadelphia, in which 
Jim Kehoe took the 880 and Tom Fields 
the two miles, captured the Collegiate 
point trophy in the Catholic U. game, in 
Washington and did well in their own 
meet, the Maryland-Fifth Regiment games 
in Baltimore, but their outstanding and 
exceptional performance was registered in 
the Southern Conference title affair at 
Chapel Hill. 

The Terps won all six of the running 
events at Chapel Hill to sweep half the 
card of 12 contests, but took second place 
to a powerful and well-balanced North 
Carolina squad that captured only three 
individual titles. 

Joe Murphy in the 60-yard dash, Alan 
Miller in the quarter, Kehoe in the half, 
Mason Chronister in the mile, Fields in 
the two miles, and the mile relay team, on 
which the first three mentioned and Eddie 
(Continued on Page 10, Col. 2) 



Maryland Alumni News 



Old Line Athletic Contributions 



By W. H. ("Bili") HOTTEL: 



SPRING SPORTS OUTLOOK BRIGHT- 
SCHEDULES UNUSUALLY DIFFICULT 



Maryland's athletic teams in varsity 
baseball, lacrosse, track and tennis arc 
busily preparing for much action and dif- 
ficult competition in spriag sports. 

These four squads are slated to take part 
h 55 events, 34 of which are carded at 
heme with several big contests at nearby 
points. Baseball leads with 1 5 games at 
home and 9 abroad; lacrosse has 6 tilts at 
College Park and 3 away: the track team 
travels for onlv 3 of 8 meets, and the ten- 
nis players entertain in 8 of 14 matches. 
Hard Record To March 

Baseball, winning 12 of 20 tests; la- 
crosse, taking 7 of 9; tennis, capturing 9 
of 10, and track, taking 5 of 7 dual meets, 
turned in a total of 33 triumphs against 
1 3 defeats last spring, but the odds are 
greatly against such a fine record this year. 

Baseball, which had the honor of pry- 
ing off the lid in spring sports in a game 
with Ohio State on March 27, has Rut- 
gers, Dartmouth, Michigan and George- 
town, in addition to its Southern Confer- 
ence rivals, as high spots on its attractive 
list; Dartmouth also graces a tough track 
card; the lacrosse team plays practically 
all of the big guns of the game, and the 
tennis crowd has a "suicide" schedule. 

While Waverly Wheeler, third sacker; 
Mike Surgent and Bill Bryant, outfielders, 
and Bill Wood and Bill Steiner, pitchers, 
left big gaps in the diamond outfit, the 
nine again should be capable and well 
balanced. 

Many Diamond Veterans 

George Knepley, at first; Shorty Chum- 
bris, at second or third; Eddie Johnson, 
at short; Hugh Keller, brother of the 
noted Charley, and Lefty Chumbris, out- 
fielders; Bob Burns and Joe Crisafull, catch- 
ers, and Charlie Weidinger and Lefty Earl 
Springer, pitchers, are veterans on hand. 

Adam Bengoechea, another leftover, is 
a versatile infielder, while Pershing Mon- 
dorff, who played in the infield last year, 
has turned pitcher and appears sure to 
make good. 

Fritz Maiscl, outfielder; Sherry Robert- 
son, infielder; Frank Dvvyer, pitcher, and 
Pat Mudd, catcher, appear to be best of 
the rookies, both the first two named be- 
ing banked upon to play regularly. Jack 



Gordon, infielder. and Bill England and 
Burton Culver, outfielder, also show prom- 
ise. 

Lacrosse Has Big Job 

Lacrosse has only three regulars from 
1939 with which to start the season: Fred 
Hewitt, center; Jim Meade and Milton 
Mulitz, second and first defense, respect- 
ively, and the two first named have been 
shifted. Hewitt now is stationed at a 
home and Meade is plaving second attack. 

Leo Mueller, 1938 letter man; Bob 
Brown, big football tackle, and Gary Todd, 
a soph, may round out the defense. George 
Lawrence, 1938 reserve defense man, who 
has been shifted to center; Oscar Nevares, 
an "M" man last spring, and Jordan Sex- 
ton, a soph, arc the leaders in the race 
to fill out the attack. 

Bill Cole, Bill Bond and Jim Ilcil. let 
tcr men; Bob Brand, a leftover, and Jack 
Mueller, a soph, are the outstanding con- 
tenders for jobs some place. 

Goalie Offers Problem 

Goal is bv far the most unsettled spot, 
with John Muncks, who played in 1937; 
Jack Grier, last year's reserve, and Fred 
Widener, a soph, having a mcrrv race for 
the top assignment. 

Maryland was severely jolted by losses 
that included Haskin Dcclev, last year's 
goal tender; Fred Neilson and Parker Lind- 
say, two all-America attack players; George 
Watson, second all-America team mem- 
ber; Bill Groff, another regular on the at- 
tack, and Bill Wolfe, defense ace. Neil- 
son, No. 1 rated player of the country, 
and Deeley left school, while the others 
completed their careers. 

Track Has Weak Spots 

Having already demonstrated by fine 
work indoors that it is pretty well fixed 
with runners, jumpers and hurdlers, the 
track team has a big problem in most of 
the field events. 

Joe Murphy, Alan Miller, Jim Kehoe, 
Tom Fields and Mason Chronister lead 
the running array; Eddie Miller, aided by 
Francis Morris, can take care of the high 
jumping; Hermic Evans and Joe Devin 
should do a good job in the hurdles, while 
Francis Kcnney, John Beers and John IIol- 
loway are broad jumpers of ability. 



World mile mark set 
in Baltimore meet 

Running the fastest mile ever stepped 
or a flat track, John Munski of the Uni- 
versity of Missouri, spiced the third annual 
Maryland-Fifth Regiment meet in the hit- 
ter's armory in Baltimore on the night of 
March 11 with a world record in winning 
the featured Governor's Mile. His time 
was 4:13.5, supplanting the mark of 4:15, 
sc 1 on the same track by Glenn Cunning- 
ham, the noted Kansan, a year previous. 

Mason Chronister and Jim Kehoe of 
Maryland were second and third, respect- 
ively, to the fleet little Munski, but they 
were not close enough to really be in the 
race. 

It was a fine meet, one in which eleven 
records were broken and five tied, but the 
attendance was greatly reduced on account 
of a freezing rain that began falling late 
in the afternoon and made travel extreme- 
ly hazardous. 

Outside of the running of Chronister 
and Kehoe in the mile, Alan Miller's vic- 
tory in the 440 to retain his title, Tom 
Fields' seconds in the Collegiate mile and 
the two-mile A. A. U. race, and Eddie 
Miller's second in the high jump were 
the Terps' main accomplishments. 

Maryland also was second to Navy in 
the fight for the Collegiate team trophy, 
getting 9 points to the Middies' 16. Pas- 
son A. A. of Philadelphia took the open 
A. A. U. cup with 1 5 points, and Mer- 
cersburg captured the Scholastic award 
with 13. 

Approximately 425 athletes from col 
leges, clubs, schools and the Fifth Regi- 
ment took part in the thirty events. 

Plans already are afoot for the 1940 
games and it is hoped that the weather 
man will be kinder. 



However, getting points in the shot, dis- 
cus, javelin and pole vault is a different 
matter. 

Some Clever Netmen 

Allic Ritzcnberg and Nathan Askin, 
among the ranking young netmen in this 
section, lead a capable tennis squad that is 
made up of six racketers from last year 
and a like number of newcomers, but the 
opposition is such that a fifty-fifty season 
would be an accomplishment. 

A siege of 5 hard matches in 6 days pre- 
sents a tremendous barrier. 



March, 1939 



SPRING SPORTS 



Qrdpevinc News About ^hose We Know 



Mar. 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 
May 
May 



BASEBALL 

27— Ohio State 

1 — Rutgers 

4 — Vermont 

7 — Dartmouth 

8 — Virginia Poly at Blacksburg 
10 — V. M. I. at Lexington 
11 — Washington and Lee at Lexington 
12— Boston College 
14 and 15 — Michigan 
17 — Richmond at Richmond 
18 — William and Mary at Williamsburg 
22 — Georgetown at Washington 
24 — Virginia Poly 
29 — Washington College at Chestertown 

1— Duke 

4 — William and Mary 

5 — Richmond 

6 — Washington College 
13 — Washington and Lee and V. M. I. 

(double header) 
16 — Lafayette at Easton 
17 — Rutgers at New Brunswick 
20 — Georgetown 



LACROSSE 

April 1 — Mount Washington at Baltimore 

April 6 — Harvard 

April 8— Penn State 

April 15— St. John's 

April 22— Rutgers 

April 29 — Princeton 

May 6 — Baltimore A. C. 

May 13 — Navy at Annapolis 

May 20 — Johns Hopkins at Baltimore 



TRACK 

April 5 — Dartmouth 
April 8 — Virginia Poly 
April 15 — V. M. I. at Lexington 
April 22 — William and Mary 
April 29 — Penn Relays 
May 6 — Washington and Lee 
May 10 — Georgetown 
May 20 — Southern Conference meet at 
Chapel Hill 



April 13- 
April 15- 
April 17- 
April 22- 
April 24- 
April 25- 
April 26 
April 28- 
April 29- 
May 6- 
May 9- 
May 11, 

May 19- 
May 20- 



TE NNIS 

-Michigan 
-Richmond 
-William and Mary 
-Richmond at Richmond 
-Duke at Durham 
-North Carolina State at Raleigh 
-North Carolina at Chapel Hill 
-Washington and Lee 
-V. M. I. 
-Catholic U. 
-North Carolina State 
12, 13 — Southern Conference tour- 
ney at Williamsburg 
-Georgetown 
-Navy at Annapolis 



To Wed — Mary Francis Garner, '37, a 
member of Tri Dclt, and Charley Wantz, 
'35, a member of Phi Sigma Kappa, will 
tie the matrimonial knot on May 13 in 
Washington, D. C. Charley is employed 
by the General Motors Corporation in 
Baltimore, where the newlyweds-to-be will 
reside. 



10 



Boxing — When the Southern Confer- 
ence boxing tournament was held in Co- 
lumbia, South Carolina, who should be 
on hand but Capt. John W. (Jack) Har- 
mony, former Old Line boxing coach. 
Jyck now is stationed at Fort Benning, 
Georgia. It was quite a reunion for Jack 
as he saw the boys bring home the Con- 
ference championship. 

Another Alumnus was in Columbia at 
the time, Mr. and Mrs. Charlev Bcrrv, '34, 
'37 (Ruth Krcitcr ) were also seen in Co- 
lumbia. Thcv live in Charlotte, N. C, 
and were going south at the time. Geary 
Epplev had a short chat with them. 
O 

Law — Hubert K. Arnold, '35, visits the 
campus whenever he returns for a vaca- 
tion from his law studies at Duke Univer- 
sity. It is Hubert's expectation to get his 

Law degree this vear. 
O 
Celloloid— Mr. and Mrs. Tom Neff, 
'33 and '34, formerly Charlotte Hood, are 
now residing in Newark, N. J., where Tom 
is employed by the Celloloid Products 

Companv. 

O 

Frozen Food — Jimmy Lcwald, '37, is 
with the Birds Eye Frozen Foods Con- 
cern as special representative for the Wash- 
ington area. He is sometimes assisted by 
his wife, the former Miss Ella May Tuttle, 
'38. 

The couple reside in Washington. It 
is probable that they will go to the New 
York World's Fair for special demonstra- 
tions. 

O 

Birth — Mr. and Mrs. John Poole an- 
nounce the arrival of a baby boy. Mrs. 
Poole was formerlv the well-known Edith 
Graham. 

Boxers Gain Crown 

(Contimied from Page 8, Col. 3) 
Miller ran, were the Maryland winners. 
Chronister's 4:16.1 mile, Alan Millers' 51- 
second quarter, Kehoc's 1:56.8 in the 880 
and the relay team's 3:29.3 were meet 
records. 

Kehoe won the Rector's 1,000, feature 
of the Catholic U. games, in which Mary- 
land also took the relay honors. Chronistcr 
won the 660 special, Eddie Miller took 
the high jump and Fields stepped to the 
front in the mile. 

The Baltimore meet is discussed else- 
where. 



DELTA SIG NEWS 

George A. Wick, '23, of 5023 Illinois 
Avenue, N.W., Washington, D. C, is 
chief engineer to Rosslvn Steel and Ce- 
ment Company. 

Ernest Gillette Davis, '24, was recently 
married. Ernie is an engineer with the 
Treasury Department and is residing in 
Fphrata, Pennsvlvania. 

James Leroy Dougall, '25, is still with 
the Washington Loan and Trust Com- 
pany, West End Branch of Washington, 
D. C. 

John Philip Schaefer, '23, is still selling 
power for the Potomac Electric Power 
Company. He is living on Middlesex Land, 
Bethesda, Md. John is married and the 
father of three youngsters. 

James C. Greely, Jr., '32, is the proud 
father of a voting daughter. The Greelvs 
are residing at 85 Pleasant Street, Glou- 
cester, Massachusetts. 

Arthur G. Turner, Jr., '32, 324 Gar- 
land Avenue, Takoma Park, D. C, is em- 
ployed with the Turner Construction Com- 
pany. He is married and the father of a 
baby girl. 

Mr. and Mrs. John P. Huebsch have a 
baby girl. John, '33, is employed at the 
Potomac Electric Power Company, and 
thev expect to move to Virginia soon. 

A C. Turner, '34, is employed by S. D. 
Moss Company of Washington, D. C. He 
is married and has a boy, A. C, Jr., and a 
girl, Carol Lynn. 

Warren Evans, '36, is teaching Physical 
Education at Frederick High School, Md. 

George David (Jim) Garber, '36, sup- 
plies the citizens of Frederick with fresh 
breadstuffs from the Garber Bakerv. 

Jack Herbsleb, '36, is working with the 
Siandard Engineering Corporation. 

Louis R. Hueper, '37, married Laura 

Gunby, '37. They arc living at Berwyn, 

Mci. 

o 

Medicine — Dr. Leo T. Brown, '23, 
M.D., '25, has announced the removal of 
his offices to 1621 New Hampshire Ave- 
nue, N.W., Washington, D. C. 
o 

Books — A book on The Mechanism of 
Thought Imager}' and Hallucination has 
been WTitten by Dr. Joshua Rosett, a grad- 
uate of the Medical School. The book is 
published by the Columbia University 
Press. Dr. Rosett is Professor of Neurology 
at Columbia University and Scientific Di- 
rector of the Brain Research Foundation. 

Maryland Alumni News 



i 



;1 ' 

oci 

m 



Grapevine News About Those We Know 



Engaged — A campus visit recently re- 
vealed the news that Herbert Brill, '36, 
class president, is engaged to Miss Evelyn 
Brandt of Baltimore. "Herb" is remem- 
bered as one of Jack Fabcr's star defense 
men in lacrosse. He is a member of Phi 
Delta Theta and a former captain in the 

R. O. T. C. 

o 

Change — Virginia Cooke and Richard 
lliggins are now Mr. and Mrs. R. W. 
Higgins, residing at 107 10th Street, N.E., 
Washington, D. C. Dick is a member of 
Lambda Chi Alpha, '33. Virginia is a 
Kappa Delta in the class of '32. 
O 

Agriculture — In the State of Virginia, 

W. H. Cockerill. '29, Kappa Alpha and 
former football, lacrosse and track star, is 
an agricultural countv agent. 



C. C. C— B. F. Ilavlick, '33, from Sec- 
retary, Md., is educational director for the 
CCC camp at Boonsboro, Md. 


Penn State — At State College, Pennsyl- 
vania, C. \V. Pierce, '32, is instructor in 
Agriculture Economics. 
O 

Soil — J. W. Clay, 33. now is doing 
soil erosion work in Virginia, North Caro- 
lina and Tennessee. 

O 

Teaching — Vocational Agriculture 
teaching is the profession of Donald E. 
Watkins, '24, former diamond star. His 
duties take him into Montgomery, Fred- 
crick and Carroll Counties. 



Engaged — The former Terrapin beauty 
queen, Miss Mary Stallings, '35, a mem- 
ber of Alpha Omicron Pi, is engaged to 
Mr. Creighton Reid Coleman of Michi- 
gan. Mary, a first honor student in her 
College at Maryland, is studying law at 
George Washington University and will 

graduate this year. 



Married — On February 4, Virginia Ven- 

emann, '37, and Bruce McFadden, '38, 

were married in Hyattsville. Virginia has 

been with the Red Cross Educational 

Service. Bruce is a member of Delta Sigma 

Phi. The newlyweds arc residing in IIv 

attsvillc. 

o 

Potash — Francis E. Smith, Jr., '37, of 
Riviera Beach, Md., now is sales represen- 
tative for the Northeast District of Potash 
Companv of America. He was formerly 
with the Davison Chemical Company. 
O 

Investment — In the investment depart 
ment of the Acacia Mutual Life Insurance 
we find Robert O. Ilammerlund, '37. Bob 
is a member of Theta Chi and was active 
in student affairs and won the varsity "M" 
as manager of basketball. 



Accounting — James F. Rintoul, Jr., '36, 

a former member of the Terp Tennis 

Squad, now is doing accounting for the 

Penn Water and Power Company in Bal 

timorc. Jim is a member of Theta Chi. 
O 

Insurance — A first honor student in the 
College of Agriculture, Henry G. Harns, 
'35, now is with the Acacia Life Insur- 
ance Companv in Washington, D. C. 



• •••••• 

University of 
Maryland 

Annual 

FIELD DAY 

SATURDAY, 
MAY 6 , 1939 



TRACK MEET 

Maryland vs. Washington & Lee 

BASEBALL 

Maryland vs. Washington College 

LACROSSE 

Maryland vs. Balto. Athletic Club 

TENNIS 

Maryland vs. Catholic University 



Three Hundred Boys in 

Scholastic Track and Field 

Events 

PROGRAM BEGINS AT 
12:30 NOON 

******* 



CUT ON THIS LINE 



rlave You Joined Your Fellow Alumni? 

=IF NOT, FILL OUT AND RETURN THIS BLANK NOW 

Fellow Alumni: 

; wish to be a contributing member of 
le University of Maryland Alumni As- 
Dciation, and am enclosing the usual 
mount of $2.00 for the year 1938-1939, 
f this fifty cents is for one year's sub- 
:ription to the Alumni News. 



Name. Class Occupation 

Address. 

Married? To whom .Children 

Business address Title.... 




THE BLEND THAT CAIV'T BE COPIED 

THE RIGHT COMBINATION OF THE WORLD'S BEST CIGARETTE TOBACCOS 




APRIL 
1939 



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ALUMNI 
NEWS 




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MASON CHKONISTER 



EDDIE MILLER 



JIM KEHOE 



MARYLAND will present one of its finest programs on Ma}- 6th at College 
Park it ever has offered in its Annual Field Day, with every event on the 
card certain to provide keen competition. There will be close to five hours of 
action in a scries of contests that will start at 1 o'clock. Following is the com- 
plete program: 



1 P. M.-Track: 

Interscholastic Meet, with thirteen open 
events and eight closed to county high 
schools of the State. 

1:30 P. M.-Track: 

Washington and Lee vs. Maryland, to be 
run concurrently with the scholastic com- 
petition. 

1:30 P.M.-Tennis: 

Catholic University vs. Maryland. 

2:30 P. M.-Baseball: 

Washington College vs. Maryland. 

4 P. M— Lacrosse: 

Baltimore Athletic Club vs. Maryland. 

(Lacrosse game will follow completion of truck 
meets in Bvrd Stadium.) 




ALAN MILLER (Maryland) left and CARL CURL 
(Washington and Lee) who ran a dead heat in the 
Terp-Fifth Regiment Meet in Baltimore in 1938, 
are due to battle in the 440 again May 6th. 



Volume X 



MARYLAND ALUMNI NEWS, APRIL, 1939 



Number 1 1 



Alu 



mn 



Association — University of Maryland 

Founded in 1892 



OFFICERS FOR 1938 - 39 

C. Walter Cole, '21, President 
Towson, Md. 

Charles W. Sylvester, '08, Vice-President Baltimore, Md. 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Secretary-Treasurer College Park, Md. 

ALUMNI BOARD 
(Note — The officers named above are also members of the Alumni Board) 

Reuben Brigham, '08 Arts and Sciences 

Charles V. Koons, '29 Engineering 

P. W. Chichester, '20 Education 

John A. Silkman, '35 Agriculture 

Ruth Miles, '31 Home Economics 

MEMBERS AT LARGE 

Esther Hughes Lee, '33 Women's Representative 

J. Donald Kieffer, '30 Men's Representative 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Editor 

Maryland Alumni News, issued monthly by the University of Maryland Alumni Associa- 
tion at College Park, Md., as second-class matter under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Annual Alumni Association dues are $2.00. One year's subscription to Alumni News, 
50 cents. 

GROUP LEADERS 

Allegany County: E. Brooke Whiting, '98, President; Dr. Joseph Franklin, '21, Secretary, 

Cumberland, Md. 
Baltimore County: C. Walter Cole, '21, President; H. B. Derrick, '17, Secretary, Towson, Md. 
Baltimore City: Chester Tawney, '31, President, 4022 Roland Avenue; E. Gordon Ham- 
mond, '34, Secretary, 1023 W. Barre Street, Baltimore, Md. 
Caroline County: George W. Clendaniel, '20, President, Denton, Md.; Dr. Maurice A. Brackett, 

'21, Treasurer, Denton, Md.; Mrs. George W. Clendaniel, '21, Secretary, Denton, Md. 
Harford County: W. B. Munnikhuysen, '14, President; H. M. Carroll, '20, Secretary, Bel 

Air, Md. 
Frederick County: J. Homer Remsberg, '18, President; Henry R. Shoemaker, '17, Secretary, 

Frederick, Md. 
Montgomery County: Lawrence G. Smoot, '18, President, Kensington, Md.; Mary Fisher, '36, 

Secretary, Rockville, Md. 
New York City: Donald Kieffer, '30, President, 195 Broadway; Sarah Morris, '25, Secretary, 

140 E. 63rd Street, New York City. 
Philadelphia: A. Moulton McNutt, '06, President, 413 Cooper Street, Camden, N. J.; J. P. 

Mudd, '07, Secretary, 174 Manheim Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Pittsburgh: E. Minor Wenner, '27, President, 1111 Gladys Avenue; Dr. A. A. Krieger, '32, 

Secretary Highland Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Washington, D. C: J. Douglas Wallop, '19, President, 6139 N. Dakota Avenue, N.W.; 

Charles V. Koons, '29, Secretary, 419 Fourth Street, N.E., Washington. 
Washington County: Hon. Henry Holzapfel, Jr., '93, President, Hagerstown, Md.; L. G. 

Mathias, '23, Secretary, Hagerstown, Md. 



"M" CLUB OFFICERS AND BOARD MEMBERS 



Donald H. Adams, '28 President 

A. K. Besley, '23 Vice-President 



Dr. E. N. Cory, '09 Secretary-Treas. 

W. B. Maslin, '09 Historian 



REPRESENTATIVES 



G. F. Pollock, '23 Baseball 

H. B. Shipley, '14 Basketball 

Stewart McCaw, '35 Boxing 

Tames Stevens, '19 Lacrosse 

Lewis W. Thomas, '28 Track 



James Busick, '35 Tennis 

Charles Remsberg, '26 Cross Country 

W. C. Supplee, '26 Football 

Dr. E. B. Friedenwald, '03 ) . T 

Dr. A. W. Valentine, '04 \ At Lar 8 c 



Cover Picture 

Is of Gerneaux Hall, former liome of 
Capt. R. W. Silvester/ President of the 
College Park Schools of the University 
from 1892 to JL916. No former student 
really needs to be told about the location 
of Gerneaux Hall. Those who attended 
during the tenure of office of Captain Sil- 
vester well remember the home of this 
dynamic leader. 

Following Captain Silvester's resigna- 
tion, Gerneaux Hall became the girls' dor- 
mitory with the coming of the coed after 
the World War. It continued in this ca- 
pacity until the completion of a new girls' 
dormitory and since then it has been the 
home of the Kappa Delta Sorority. 



Fellow Alumni 

On Saturday evening, April 15th, the 
New York Alumni Group held a delightful 
party in New York City. Harry Watts per- 
formed in his usual masterful manner as 
toastmastcr. Among the speakers were 
President "Curly" Byrd and Munroe Leaf, 
"Father" of "Ferdinand, the Bull." Many 
prominent oldtimers were there, including 
such outstanding athletes as Lyman Ober- 
lin and Mack Rich. 

It gave me an opportunity first-hand to 
impart to the group some of the accom- 
plishments and plans of our Association 
under the caption of "Notes on the Mar- 
gin." The announcement of the appoint- 
ment of our Board of Trustees to admin- 
ister and build up the Alumni Fund, and 
the dedication of the Rossbourg Inn to the 
traditions of the University as associated 
with the Alumni, to be held on Alumni 
Day, and the plans for Alumni Day to be 
held Friday, June 2nd, were enthusiastic- 
ally received. When the names of Dr. Bom- 
berger, Harry Watts, Bill Groff, Austin 
Diggs and Dizzy Matthias were men- 
tioned as the Trustees a big applause went 
up. This fund can mean much to stabilize 
and inspire the Association through the 
granting of student loans and scholarships 
and enabling other worthwhile endeavors 
bv the Association in connection with the 
University. 

Careful plans are being made to make 
Alumni Dav this year one of the most at- 
tractive that we have had. We hope that 
it will be the beginning of a permanent 
plan whereby it will begin on the day be- 
fore Commencement with an outstanding 
dinner and program preceding the June 
Ball on Friday night and extending through 
Commencement Day, with the Com- 
mencement services being held Saturday 
evening at twilight instead of in the morn- 
ing as held in recent years. The University 
(Continued on Page 4) 



Industrial Education Program 

In Aims And Scope 



i 



mprovcs 



ii 



University of Maryland Alumni will be 
interested to know that the College of 
Education began the academic year of 
1938-39 with a reorganized curriculum in 
Industrial Education. The revised program 
of studies provides : ( 1 ) a four-year cur- 
riculum leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in Industrial Education, ad- 
ministered both at College Park and in 
Baltimore, with limited variations in order 
to meet certification requirements of the 
State and Baltimore Departments of Edu- 
cation; (2) a program of courses for the 
improvement of vocational teachers in 
service; ( 3 ) graduate courses leading to the 
degree of Master of Arts in Industrial Edu- 
cation; and (4) summer session courses for 
advanced undergraduate and graduate stu- 
dents in vocational education. 

There is sufficient latitude of electives 
in the reorganized curriculum to enable 
students to meet certification requirements 
in some other high school subject, and to 
secure supplementary knowledge in related 
fields such as vocational guidance, place- 
ment and occupational information. 

While the Department of Industrial 
Education centers in the College of Edu- 
cation, its activities are shared with other 
Colleges of the University in effecting 
purposes to maintain high standards in 
developing broad-minded, skillful indus- 
trial arts and vocational-industrial teachers 
for Maryland schools. 

The College of Arts and Sciences con- 
tributes a basic liberal foundation upon 
which the general and specific professional 
training of vocational teachers is built. 
The Department of Industrial Education 
is fortunate also in having the coopera- 



tion of the College of Engineering, which 
makes possible a bilateral arrangement that 
piovides shop facilities for effective in- 
struction in methods and practice of teach- 
ing shop subjects. 

The State of Maryland has not been suf- 
ficiently served in accordance with its needs 
for more and better prepared industrial 
arts and vocational-industrial teachers. 
Over ninety per cent, of such teachers in 
the State schools have had to be imported 
from other States. There is a great oppor- 
tunity, therefore, for promising young 
men to major in Industrial Education at 
the University of Maryland, and to find 
ready employment in State high schools 
upon successful completion of degree re- 
quirements. In fact, enrollments at Col- 
lege Park increased more than seventy per 
cent, during 1938-39 in the Department 
of Industrial Education, while the Balti- 
more Vocational Teacher-Training Center 
showed a fiftv per cent, increase in regis- 
trations. 

Alumni will appreciate the knowledge 
that seventv-five persons have been granted 
the B.S. degree in Industrial Education 
since 1933, and are successfully teaching 
in their major field. Many of these gradu- 
ates have been promoted to responsible 
supervisory or administrative positions. 
Over thirty of them are doing resident 
graduate work either in the Baltimore Cen- 
ter or at College Park during summer ses- 
sions. 

Professor Glen D. Brown has been head 
of the Department since September, 1937, 
and Assistant Professor Ralph Gallington 
began his services at College Park in the 
fall of 1938. 



De Marr, '30, In Panama 

Marriage news about James De Marr, 
'30, has just arrived, even though the cer- 
emony was August 24, 1938, in the Re- 
public of Panama. The bride is the former 
Miss Feme H. Morgan of Pedro Miguel, 
Canal Zone. The newly weds are living in 
Panama City. 

Jim, a member of the Signal Corps, now 
is radio engineer for the Army in the Pan- 
ama Canal Department. He was formerly 
with the Third Corps Area in Baltimore, 
but as he was a good student in Spanish, 
the probable reason for the transfer is 
apparent. 



Fellow Alumni 

(Continued from Page 3) 
is cooperating to the fullest extent and is 
generously offering rooms to all who desire 
to remain on the campus Friday night at 
the nominal cost of 50 cents per room. 

We believe the dedication of the Ross- 
bourg Inn by the Alumni as a feature of 
Alumni Day should be an appealing item 
of the program. Plan now to attend with 
your family and friends and we will try 
to do our part to entertain vou. 
Sincerely yours, 

C. Walter Cole, 

President. 



June Week Events 
Conclude 132nd Year 
In University History 

First of the final events of the year will 
be the baccalaureate exercises held at the 
College Park Schools on Sunday, May 28. 
The following week will be a series of 
events both in Baltimore and College 
Park. 

The various schools in Baltimore will 
have Alumni meetings, banquets and 
dances for the graduating classes. Special 
awards will be presented to students who 
have attained outstanding success during 
their four years in college. Clinics will be 
held bv the Medical and Dental Schools 
for returning grads. 

College Park 

A special award assembly of all students 
will be held following the final exam at 
which time honors will be conferred upon 
outstanding students. Reserve Officers' 
Commissions will be awarded. 

The Senior Banquet — the final get-to- 
gether of the class before receiving the 
sheep skin. This banquet is followed by 
the final dance sponsored by the Ross- 
bourg Club. The following evening the 
seniors return the junior class's gesture to 
them at the Junior Prom by the traditional 
Junior-Senior German; then the June Ball, 
preceded during the dav with a round of 
Alumni events. 

Commencement 

On Saturday morning, June 3, the Com- 
mencement Exercises for Baltimore and 
College Park classes are held in the Ritchie 
Coliseum. Here more than 4,000 people 
assemble to see the final event of the year. 
Following the exercises all those attending 
the Commencement are invited to a buffet 
luncheon on the campus as guests of the 
University. Alumni are urged to return for 
the week and remain for the Commence- 
ment Exercises and luncheon. The latter 
is a verv informal and enjoyable affair, 
o 

Newark, Del. — That slinging George 
V. "Bull" Chalmer, '32, of 1931 gridiron 
fame, now is located in the Congoleum 
Company of Marcus Hook, Pa. George is 
married and has two children. The Chal- 
mers reside in Newark, Delaware. 
O 

Stemmers Run — A prominent farmer of 
this region is George H. Vandermast, '19. 
O 

Hyattsville — Postmaster of this metrop- 
olis is Egbert Tingley, '27, former top 
man of the Old Line Tennis Squad. 

Maryland Alumni News 



Restored Rossbourg Inn To Be Dedicated 

To The Spirit And Traditions Of Alumni 




AS a feature of the Alumni Day pro- 
gram this year, the University plans to 
turn over to the Alumni Association the 
program for dedicating the old Rossbourg 
Inn, now being restored to its original 
condition. At least, this is the recommen- 
dation that will be placed before the Board 
of Regents at the next meeting of the 
Board, and it is expected that the Board 
will approve the arrangement. 



The Alumni Association plans to dedi- 
cate the building to the spirit and tra- 
ditions of University of Maryland gradu- 
ates. Especially is the dedication of this 
building in keeping with this objective for 
the simple reason that it is the oldest 
building on the campus and perhaps the 
building best known to all graduates. 
As A Museum 

The uses to which the building is to be 



put have not been determined. Consider- 
able sentiment, though, exists for making 
the building something of a museum, to 
be furnished appropriately in the style of 
the period in which it was constructed. 
This would preclude any utilitarian uses 
for the building, although plans are being 
made to devote part of it to a club room 
for luncheons and other meals and for 
(Continued on Page 6) 



April, 1939 



Class Reunions Planned 
For Alumni Day 

Special five-year reunions of classes will 
be one of the outstanding features of 
Alumni Day. The Class of 1914, celebrat- 
ing their twenty -fifth reunion, report they 
will show the way for a real class reunion. 
It has been proposed that special dress 
in the nature of canes, hats, coats, or 
other suitable emblems, be worn for 
designating the classes. Also that a parade 
by classes before the movie camera be an 
event of the day. For entertainment dur- 
ing the afternoon a soft ball game between 
classes would be staged. Competition 
among the ladies in archery or other suit- 
able contests operated by the Women's 
Physical Education Department. Prizes 
will be awarded in all contests. 

Tentative plans call for a band concert 
and the presentation of a play by the Foot- 
light Club. All in all, there is every indi- 
cation this will be the greatest Alumni 
Day ever held at College Park. Set the 
date on your calendar and do not disap- 
point your fellow Alumnus. Meet him at 
College Park on Friday, June 2. 

Presidents of the classes are as follows: 
1934, Norwood Sothoron; 1929, Gordon 
Kessler; 1924, Charles E. Prince; 1919, 
Erston V. Miller; 1914, Frank S. Hoff- 
echer; 1909, C. F. Mayer; 1904, Walter 
R. Mitchell; 1899, John W. Chambers; 
1894, Frank B. Bomberger; 1889, T. D. 
Griffith. 



Alumni Student Union 

Recently the Diamoiidback presented an 
editorial on behalf of the students' desire 
for a Union Building. In such a building 
many of the traditions of Maryland could 
be more adequately fostered. Here the stu- 
dents and the Alumni would be united in 
a common unified purpose, the traditions 
of the Old Line School. 

What more fitting project could the 
Alumni venture upon than assisting their 
future fellow Alumni in a cause destined 
to be one of the strongest traditions at 
Maryland? A philanthropic Alumnus who 
would take the lead in starting such a proj- 
ect would be designating himself to a 
cause for the development of vouth in 
those character building activities. Here the 
extra-curricular activities of students would 
be under closer supervision, more students' 
endeavors would have suitable environ- 
ments; the faculty could be brought closer 
to the students and, above all, the interests 
of the students in the traditions of Mary- 
land would be so emphatically cultivated 
that his interest as an Alumnus would 
never wane. 

It would be a social meeting place where 
students meet on common ground, where 
the ideals of fellowship are fostered in 
service to their fellow man. Little do thev 
realize the value of all this until they have 
become Alumni and reminisce about their 
college days. Fellow Alumnus, they await 
your leadership. 



Alumni Help For 
Fellow Alumnus 

Recently a report came to the Alumni 
Office which has aroused the interest of 
the Alumni Secretary. The report was a 
survey for the past eight years of the eco- 
nomic status of College Alumni. In this 
report replies to one question was quite 
surprising: "How was your first job ob- 
tained?" The surprising part was that the 
assistance rendered by fellow Alumni to 
members of the graduating class was rated 
the lowest of all assistance received. 

Naturally, those Alumni who are in a 
position to help graduates are not ac- 
quainted with them, but they could no- 
tify the Alumni Office where openings are 
thereby giving those students who are in- 
terested an opportunity to establish a con- 
tact. This would be giving the young grad- 
uate a better feeling of confidence in him- 
self and the education of selling of him- 
self. What a senior needs is the oppor- 
tunity to meet people in the business and 
industrial world but he nor anyone else 
who has not had the experience does not 
know where to start unless he is given a 
lead. 

It is all a part of his education and here 
is a way the Alumni can help. Send to the 
Alumni Secretary the name of the firm and 
the person to see where a senior might 
have a chance to present himself. There 
will be probably more than one interested, 
so the potential employer will be the judge. 

Fellow Alumni, here is your opportu- 
nity to render a service. 



Restored Rossbourg Inn 

(Continued from Page 5) 
gatherings of various kinds. 

The building, when completed, will 
have in it twenty-one bedrooms, a tap room 
constructed in the style of the period, and 
a modernly-equipped kitchen. The work 
of restoration has embodied many changes 
and completely alters the appearance of 
the building from that familiar to gradu- 
ates of the last thirty-five or forty years. 
The central part of the building, which 
has stood with its mansard roof for the last 
seventy-five years, remains the same, with 
the exception that the mansard roof has 
been torn off and a roof similar to the one 
originally on the building has replaced it. 
A north wing and a south wing have been 
added to this central building. These wings 
were not known to have existed until an 
old survey of the property came to light 
on which was printed the plan for each 
floor of the building. After finding the 



prints on this survey, men were put to 
work digging to ascertain whether or not 
the old foundations existed. It was found 
that these foundations existed on the very 
places shown on the plan, and the present 
wings have been constructed on the same 
ground on which these old foundations 
rested . 

Built In 1798 

The door to the front center portion of 
the building is probably different from any 
other in the country. Over it is a keystone 
which bears the inscription "T. Coe, Lon- 
don" and the date "1798," and also a fig- 
uic which represents Silenus, teacher and 
trainer of Bacchus, the God of Wine. In 
addition to the keystone, the bricks which 
form the arch over the doorway undoubt- 
edly were made in England, ground there 
and brought to this country, because they 
exactly fit the archway and apparently were 
made for it. 

The front of the house probably was 



built around the proposed archway for the 
front door. 

Legend has it that the bricks for this 
building were brought from England, but 
this is unlikely, just as it is unlikely that 
the bricks were brought from England for 
any of the old buildings for which this is 
claimed. Bricks for the old inn probably 
were made in the field almost directly in 
front of where the building is constructed, 
now a part of the athletic plant. There is 
evidence that there was at one time an old 
brick kiln at that spot. 

Original Name Rossborough Inn 

A good deal of general interest is being 
shown in the restoration of the old inn, 
which, incidentally, instead of being 
spelled Rossbourg, originally had the spell- 
ing of Rossborough Inn. 

The inn was the first stopping place 

for stage coaches on the old turnpike in 

the days when stage coaches were the only 

means of travel between Washington, Bal- 

( Continued on Page 10) 



(i 



Maryland Alumni News 



Presenting Our New Members 

Of The Boa rd Of Re g ents 

Both Are Men Of Outstanding Accomplishments 
In Their Chosen Profession 

From the ranks of illustrious citizens of Maryland, Governor O'Conor, '20, has 
appointed to the Board of Regents two outstanding men: Hon. John E. Semmes, LL.B., 
'05, a prominent attorney of Baltimore, and Judge Rowland K. Adams, LL.B., '14, of the 
Supreme Bench of Baltimore. 

Few men have met opportunity with the 
initiative and ability characterized by the 
Hon. John E. Semmes. His consistent 
record of achievements places him among 
the brilliant leaders of the State. He is 
a native of Baltimore, born April 15, 1881. 
lie attended the Boys' Latin School and 
Princeton University, from which he grad- 
uated in 1902. He became a student as- 
sistant in forestry and later Assistant For- 
estry Expert, Bureau of Foresty, United 
States Department of Agriculture. 

He got his law training in the offices of 
Steele, Semmes, and Carey. 

With special interest in law, he was 
admitted to the Bar of Maryland in 1904. 

After his admission to the Bar, he prac- 
ticed law with Francis K. Carey, James 
Piper, and Bannister Hall. 

In December, 1905, he was commis- 
sioned a second lieutenant in the United 
States Marine Corps, and for three years 
served on various ships and in Cuba. Re- 
signing from the Marines in 1908, he re- 
turned to Baltimore and resumed the prac- 
tice of law with his father, the late John 
E. Semmes. A vear later with his father and 
the late Hon. Jesse N. Bowen, formed 
the present firm of Semmes, Bowen, and 
Semmes, of which he is now the senior 
partner. 

Government Service 

In addition to his legal profession, Mr. 
Semmes has been on the Board of Direc- 
tors, at various times, of several nationally- 
cnown industries and banks of Baltimore. 
Also his legal ability has been used by nu- 
merous Federal agencies during the pres- 
ent Administration. 

At present he is a member of the Board 
of Directors of the A. S. Abell Company, 
publishers of the Sun paper.. Mr. Semmes 
s a member of the Phi Beta Kappa fra- 
ternity at Princeton and the Alpha Delta 
Phi at Johns Hopkins. He belongs to the 
Maryland Club of Baltimore and the Army 
and Navy Club of Washington. He is a 
member of the Episcopal Church, and 
takes an active interest in various organi- 

April, 1939 




lion. John E. Semmes, '05 

zations of Baltimore. 

Mr. Semmes' appointment fills the va- 
cancy caused by the resignation of Mr. 
Delmar. On behalf of the Alumni Asso- 
ciation the News takes this opportunity 
to express its pleasure in having Mr. 
Semmes as a member of the Board of 
Regents of our Alma Mater. 
• 
Judge Rowland K. Adams 

Judge Roland K. Adams is a man dis- 
tinguished bv his many accomplishments 
of note in the legal profession, or he would 
not hold the esteemed position as he does 
today on the Supreme Bench of Baltimore 
City. 

A Pennsylvanian by birth, but a Mary- 
lander raised and educated. Went to the 
Washington County High School, attend- 
ed St. John's College at Annapolis, and 
graduated from the University of Mary- 
land Law School in the class of 1914. Be- 
came a member of the Bar of the Court of 




Judge Rowland K. Adams, 14 

Appeals of Maryland the same year. Be- 
gan the practice of law as an associate in 
the firm of Ilanaan. Cook, Chesnut, and 
Markell. 

Veteran Of World War 

In 1917 he entered the United States 
service for the duration of the World War. 
as a member of the First Officer Training 
Camp at Fort Myer, Virginia. During his 
tenure of service held the commissions of 
second lieutenant, first lieutenant, and cap- 
tain in the infantry, leaving the service in 
1918 to resume the practice of law. 

Became Deputy States Attorney of Bal- 
timore City in 1924 in which capacity he 
served for three years. March 1, 1934, was 
appointed as Associate Judge of Supreme 
Bench of Baltimore City and was elected 
in November, 1934. His present assign- 
ment is the Circuit Court No. 2 of Balti- 
more City. 

During his life Judge Adams has been 
associated with some of the outstanding 
law firms of Baltimore City. He is a mem- 
ber of the Baltimore City Bar, the Mary- 
land State Bar, and the American Bar As- 
sociation. He is also a member of the 
Board of Visitors and Governors of St. 
John's College. Civic problems have had 
benefit of his wise counsel. 

Class To Celebrate 25th Reunion 

Judge Adams is a resident of Baltimore 
City and with his family, Mrs. Adams, 
formerly Miss Hoffman, and two children, 
Martha and Rowland K., Jr., resides at 
1508 Fairbanks Road. 

On behalf of his fellow Alumni, the 
News takes this occasion to welcome Judge 
(Continued on Page 10) 



Old Line Athletic Contributions 



By W. H. ("Bill") HOTTEL: 



MARYLAND'S BALL TEAM THAT PROMISES TO MAKE GOOD RECORD 




Front Row — Burton Culver, Fritz Maisel, Hugh Keller, Leftv Chumbris, Adam Bengoechea. 
Middle Row — Joe Crisafulli, George Knepley, Eddie Johnson, Shorty Chumbris, Sherry Robertson, Arthur Rudy Bob Burns. 
BacJc Row — Manager George Seeley, Charlie Woodward, Pat Mudd, Earl Springer, Charlie Weidinger, Pershing Mondorff . 



BALL GAME WITH WASHINGTON COLLEGE AND LACROSSE TILT 

WITH BALTIMORE A C. ARE FEATURES OF FIELD DAY CARD 



Two strong State rivals are certain to 
add a lot of zest and scrap to the annual 
Field Day program at College Park on 
May 6. 

Washington College, in baseball, and 
Baltimore Athletic Club, in lacrosse, boast 
just about as powerful opposition as you 
will find in their realms and the Terps are 
sure to have their hands full in these 
pastimes. 

They should prove the top supporting 
attractions to the Interscholastic Meet of 
thirteen open events and eight closed to 
county high schools, which heads the pro- 
gram, and for which the affair principally 
is held. 

Maryland also opposes Washington and 
Lee in track, this meet to be run concur- 
rently with the Interscholastic competi- 
tion, and engages Catholic University in 



tennis. These events, though, will find the 
Teips in more favored roles than in the 
diamond and stick battles, with victories 
just about assured. 

Lefties Due To Pitch 

Washington College and Maryland were 
rained out in their game last year, but in 
1937 they staged a hot fight with the 
Terps ekeing out a 4-to-3 decision over 
Lefty Copple, the Eastern Shoremen's ace 
pitcher, who is slated to again be on the 
mound in the game this year. 

In fact, it is likely to be a southpaw duel, 
as Lefty Earl Springer, Maryland's top- 
notch junior hurler from Hagerstown, 
dcubtless will be assigned to mound duty 
by Coach Burton Shipley of the Terps. 
Both are about as good as you will view 
in collegiate ranks. 

Both teams also are good in general 



strength and, unless the unforeseen hap- 
pens, the game should provide a sterling 
duel for the fans. 

Two Powerful Stick Teams 

The lacrosse game, which will be the 
nightcap, brings what may prove to be the 
best club stick team of the year to Col- 
lege Park and offers a big barrier to Mary- 
land's high aspirations. Made up of former 
college stars, a number of them being for- 
mer Terps, the Clubmen have a powerful 
outfit that plays a polished game. 

It will be the third meeting of the teams 
and will be the rubber battle of the se- 
ries. They did not clash last year but Mary- 
land won by a 9-to-6 count in 1936 and 
Baltimore A. C. evened matters by gaining 
an 8-to-6 edge in 1937. Both were just 
as keen struggles as the scores indicate and 
it should be no different this time. 
(Continued on Page 10) 

Maryland Alumni News 



TERP LACROSSE TEAM THAT HAS PROVED SURPRISINGLY STRONG 




Front Row — John Muncks, Jim Meade, Mascot Dick Erelsford, Fred Hewitt, Bill Cole, Bill Bond, Jack Grier. 
Middle Row — Gary Todd, George Heil, Milton Mulitz, Jack Mueller, Leo Mueller, Joseph Randall, Fred Widener. 
Back Row — Jack Badenhoop, John Garrett, Charlie Allen, Jordan Sexton, Jim Forrester, Oscar Nevares, Alan Bradley, 
Bob Brand, Frank Heyer, George Lawrence. 



LACROSSE AND TRACKSTERS FLASHY; 

NINE AND NETMEN ALSO DOING WELL 



With the lacrosse and track teams un- 
beaten in their early battles and the base- 
ball and tennis squads showing usual 
strength, Maryland is well on its way to a 
fine Spring sports season. 

The Terp stiekmen began the campaign 
with a surprising 11-to-l win over Mount 
Washington and kept up the hot pace in 
the next three games by routing Harvard, 
11 to 3; Penn State, 18 to 2, and St. 
John's, 20 to 6, for the largest total ever 
run up by a Maryland stick combination. 
This is an average of 15 goals a game. 

It is balance, not great power in two 
or three positions, that has made the team 
more potent than was expected at the out- 
set of the campaign, with Rip Hewitt and 
Jim Meade being the only "old heads" on 
the outfit. With continued hard games to 
the end of the season, the task of keeping 
the squad on edge physically is a big prob- 
lem. Navy, to be met at Annapolis May 13, 
looms as the biggest obstacle to overcome. 
Annapolis experts claim the Middy ten 
is better than in 1938. 

The track team also began the season 
with an upset 63-63 tie with Dartmouth 



and followed with rather easy wins over 
Virginia Poly and V. M. I. 

With runners that would grace any track 
team, the Terps are striving to bolster up 
the field events and improvement along 
this line has been made evident. Only in 
the pole vault is Maryland now likely to 
be shutout. 

Springer Ace Of Ball Team 

Earl Springer's pitching featured the 
Terps' early ball games. He won 3 out 
of 4 in Maryland's record of 5 wins in 9 
starts and has allowed only a total of 3 
runs in 26 innings. He was charged with 
the defeat in the 4-3 loss to Ohio State as 
the Buckeyes were leading, 1 to 0, when 
he went out at the end of the third in- 
ning and the Terps never got on even 
terms. It was the first game and it had 
been decided in advance to use three 
hurlers. 

He followed with a hitless 3-to-0 shutout 
of Rutgers, in a game halted by rain after 
five innings, and beat Dartmouth, 10 to 0, 
and Michigan, 4 to 2. 

Maryland lost the services of Sherry 
Robertson, its hard-hitting third sacker, 



for half a dozen games because of a back 
injured in an impromptu wrestling match, 
and then Adam Bengoechea, the only high- 
class reserve infielder on the squad, sprained 
his wrist sliding to a base. 

Net Team Has Balance 

The tennis team, which is well balanced, 
broke even in its first two matches, losing, 
3 to 6, to Michigan by dropping all the 
doubles, but beating Richmond U., 8 to 1. 
The schedule is such that it will be diffi- 
cult to maintain more than a 50-50 pace. 

But any old grad who takes a peek at 
any of the four outfits this Spring will view 
a bunch that will make it extremely inter- 
esting for him. 

• 

Maryland's lacrosse team is helped by 
height. Jack Mueller and Leo Mueller, 
who are cousins, and Milton Mulitz and 
Gary Todd, on defense, and Jime Meade 
and Jordan Sexton, on attack, all are 6 feet 
or better. Rip Hewitt, vet attack star, also 
is 5 feet 11. 



Pershing Mondorff, Emmitsburg's con- 
tribution to Maryland athletics, is the only 
three-letter man on the campus. He has 
won the "M" in football, basketball and 
baseball. 



April, 1939 




The Newly Renovated Home ot A. T. O., located on College Avenue in College Park 



VARSITY EVENTS 



FROSH CONTESTS 



Maryland teams now are stepping into 
tlit final part of their seasons, with the 
following contests left: 

BASEBALL 

April 24 — Virginia Poly 

April 29 — Washington College at Chestertown 

May 1 — Duke 

May 4 — William and Mary 

May 5 — Richmond 

May 6 — Washington College 

May 13 — Washington and Lee and V. M. I. 

(double header) 
May 16 — Lafayette at Easton 
May 17 — Rutgers at New Brunswick 
May 20 — Georgetown 

LACROSSE 

April 29 — Princeton 

May 6— Baltimore A. C. 

May 13 — Navy at Annapolis 

May 20 — Johns Hopkins at Baltimore 

TRACK 

April 29 — Penn Relays 
May 6 — Washington and Lee 
May 10 — Georgetown 
May 20 — Southern Conference meet at 
Chapel Hill 

TENNIS 

April 24 — Duke at Durham 
April 25 — North Carolina State at Raleigh 
April 26— North Carolina at Chapel Hill 
April 28 — Washington and Lee 
April 29— V. M. I. 
May 6— Catholic U. 
May 9 — North Carolina State 
May 11, 12, 13 — Southern Conference tour- 
ney at Williamsburg 
May 19 — Georgetown 
May 20 — Navy at Annapolis 



Bel Air High continues its flow of track 
talent to Maryland. Randall Cronin, broth- 
er of Frank, who runs the 440 and 880, 
and Wylie Hopkins, a high jumper, are 
the latest contributions. Thcv arc members 
of the Terp frosh squad. 



BASEBALL 

April 28— Rockville High 

April 29— Hagerstown High (1 P. M.) 

May 1— Georgetown Frosh at G. U. (3.30) 

May 3 — George Washington Frosh 

May 8— Charlotte Hall 

May 9 — Roosevelt High (tentative) 

May 11 — Baltimore Poly 

May 15 — Thurmont High (tentative) 

May 16 — George Washington Frosh 

May 18 — Georgetown Frosh 

May 19 — Mount St. Joseph's 

LACROSSE 

May 5 — Johns Hopkins Jayvees 
May 12 — Baltimore Poly 
May 18 — Friends School 

TRACK 

April 26 — Forest Park and Central High 
May 16 — Baltimore Poly and Baltimore City 
College 

TENNIS 

April 26 — Central High 
May 6 — Blue Ridge College Freshmen 
(All games not specified are at 4 o'clock) 

• 

Maryland has four chips off the old 
blocks on its ball team. Shortstop Eddie 
Johnson is a son of the famous Walter; 
Outfielder Fritz Maisel's dad of the same 
name used to adorn third base for the 
New York Yankees; Hugh Keller, another 
guardian of the pastures, is a brother of 
Charlie, the world champs' great rookie, 
while Sherry Robertson, third sacker, is 
a nephew of Prexy Clark Griffith of the 
Washington club and brother-in-law of 
[oe Cronin, Red Sox manager. 



Hermie Evans, hurdler, and Joe Peaslee, 
who runs the mile and two miles, are the 
only outstanding Maryland tracksters who 
arc in their final year. 



Restored Rossbourg Inn 
To Be Dedicated 

(Continued from Page 6) 
timore, Philadelphia, New York and Bos- 
ton. Lafayette, in his memoirs, tells of 
spending a night there, and there is hardly 
the slightest doubt that most of the his- 
torical characters of the early days of the 
Republic visited the inn. 

Social Center 

It was at this spot that a detachment of 
General Jubal Early's cavalry camped for 
the purpose of cutting off reinforcements 
for the Union Armv from the North dur- 
ing the War Between the States. Also, the 
inn was a gathering place for fox hunters 
in the early days. It was, like all other 
taverns of its kind, a social center for this 
part of the country. 

From 1889 until four or five vears ago, 
the inn was used as the Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station offices, and to some ex- 
tent for laboratorv work. 



Presenting New Members 
Of Board Of Regents 

(Continued from Page 7) 
Adams to the Board of Regents of our 
Alma Mater and looks forward to having 
him join in many Alumni affairs. 

His class will be celebrating their twen- 
ty-fifth reunion this year. Plans are going 
forward for this event, to be held in June. 

Terps Tracksters Feature 
Field Day Card 

(Continued horn Page 8) 

Maryland's track team lacks strength in 
some of the field events, but has runners 
who travel in high society in Joe Murphy, 
Alan Miller, Jim Kehoe, Tom Fields, Ma- 
son Chronister, Joe Peaslee, Bob Condon 
and Gene Ochsenreiter, an ace high jump- 
er in Eddie Miller, an improved javelin 
thrower in Gordon Kluge, a fair shot put- 
ter in Charlie Morris, and three capable 
broad jumpers in Murphy, Francis Kenney 
and John Hollowav. 

Allic Ritzenberg. Nathan Askin, who 
now is swinging his racket instead of his 
fists, and Laurence Lichlitcr are the lead- 
ers of a good tennis team that is made up 
mainly of experienced players. 

Flock Of Schoolboy Athletes 

More than forty schools sent nearly 450 
schoolboy athletes to the meet last May 
and there is no reason to expect that the 
cntrv list will be any smaller this year. 

Bcthcsda -Chew Chase won the team 
tiophv for the closed countv competition 
last year with twenty-two points, while 
Washington-Lee High, of nearby Virginia, 
gained the open Intcrscholastic award with 
fifty. Thirtv-one schools figured in the 
scoring, sixteen in the countv division and 
fifteen in the open Interscholastics. 

Close to 600 athletes will share in the 
day's activities, which start at 1 o'clock 
with the track meet, and wind up with 
the stick battle that gets under way at 4 
P. M. One dollar pays for the whole show. 



10 



Maryland Alumni News 



University of Maryland 

ALUMNI DAY 

Friday ', June 2, 1939 

COLLEGE PARK, MD. 

Headquarters and Registration — From 10 A. M. in University Gymnasium 
(Parking and Rest Room Facilities for Men and Women) 



Special Five- Year Reunions — 5th year, 1934; 10th Year, 
1929; 15th Year, 1924; 20th Year. 1919; 25th Year, 
1914; 30th Year, 1909; 35th Year, 1904; 40th Year, 
1899; 45th Year. 1894; 50th Year, 1889. 



Class Reunion Lunches will be held in the places to be 
designated, followed by class meetings. 



Those present for the Alumni Banquet will be in- 
vited guests of the University to attend the June Ball. 
No invitations will be given to Alumni not attending 
the Banquet. Alumni desiring overnight accommoda- 
tions on the campus are requested to make their reser- 
vations in advance by writing the Alumni Seeretarv. 



Campus Tours anv time during the day. All buildings 
open for inspection. 



Entertainment foi men and women during the 
afternoon. 



4 P. M. Special Alumni exercises at Rossbourg Inn. 

5 P. M. Annual Meeting of the Alumni Association. 

6 P. M. Annual Alumni Banquet, University Dining 

Hall. A special program of entertainment. 
9 P.M. Seventv-eighth June Ball. University Gymna- 
sium. 



OTHER JUNE WEEK EVENTS 

From May 31 to June 3 there will be — 

The Student Awards Assembly 

The Senior Banquet 

The Final Rossbourg Dance 

The Junior-Senior German 

and The Commencement Exercises Saturdav Morning 
followed bv a Buffet Luncheon on the Campus. 



Aiumni Are Invited to Attend/ 



CUT ON THIS LINE 



Afill You Join Your Fellow Alumni? 

=PLEASE FILL OUT AND RETURN THIS BLANK NOW ! ! 



Fellow Alumni: 

wish to be a contributing member of 
e University of Maryland Alumni As- 
ciation, and am enclosing the usual 
lount of $2.00 for the year 1938-1939, 
this fifty cents is for one year's sub- 
ription to the Alumni News. 



Name. _ Class. 

Address 



Occupation 



Married? To whom.. Children 

Business address Title 




c 7AejR^At 



THE SECRET of Chesterfield's 
milder better taste... the reason 
why they give you more smok- 
ing pleasure ... is the right 
combination of the world's best 
cigarette tobaccos rolled in pure 
cigarette paper . . . the blend 
that can't be copied. 



THEY SATISFY 



Copyright 1939, Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. 




ALUMNI 
NEWS 



MAY 
1939 



4^ 

11 U pi 



1,0 ALUMNI 
Z^REUNION 

FRIDAY JUNE 2.1939 




•i 

M 



-;: 



s 



CALLING ALL ALUMNI 



TO THE 



Forty- Seventh Annual 
Alumni Reunion 



FRIDAY, JUNE 2, 1939 
COLLEGE PARK. 



"To get better acquainted 



Headquarters and Registration — University Library, Open All Day 

University Open House — 

Faculty to Receive Alumni in Various Departments Between 11 and 1 — 2 and 4 

12.00 Noon— Flag Raising by the Fifty-Year Class, 1889. 

1.00 P.M. — General Alumni and Class Reunion Luncheon, University Dining Hall — 50 cents. 

2.30 P.M.— Class Reunions: '89, '94, '99, '04, '09, '14, '19, '24, '29, '34, and Campus Visitation. 

3.30 P.M. — University Band Concert — Rossbourg Inn. 

4.30 P.M. — Dedicatory Ceremonies at the Rossbourg Inn. 

5.00 P.M. — Annual Meeting of the Alumni Association — University Library. 

6.30 P.M. — Annual Alumni Reunion Dinner — University Dining Hall — $1.00 per 
Person (Includes June Ball). 

9.00 P.M. to 1 A.M. — The Seventy-Seventh Annual Commencement Ball — University Gym. 
Only those Alumni who attend Alumni Dinner will be guests of the University at the Ball. 

For Detailed Information, Turn to Page 4. 




Sinai or Mil i.ard E. Tydings, '10 



Thinner 

SPEAKERS 

Senator Tydings 

Munro Leaf 

SOLOIST 
Miss Louise Baer 

New York City 




Munro Leaf, '27 



Ill 



Volume X 



MARYLAND ALUMNI NEWS, MAY, 1939 



Number 12 



Alumni Association — University of Maryland 

Founded in 1892 



OFFICERS FOR 1938 - 39 

C. Walter Cole, '21, President 
Towson, Md. 

Charles W. Sylvester, '08, Vice-President Baltimore, Md. 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Secretary-Treasurer College Park, Md. 

ALUMNI BOARD 
{Note — The officers named above are also members of the Alumni Board) 

Reuben Brigham, '08 Arts and Sciences 

Charles V. Koons, '29 Engineering 

P. W. Chichester, '20 Education 

John A. Silkman, '35 Agriculture 

Ruth Miles, '31 Home Economics 

MEMBERS AT LARGE 

Esther Hughes Lee, '33 Women's Representative 

J. Donald Kieffer, '30 Men's Representative 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Editor 

Maryland Alumni News, issued monthly by the University of Maryland Alumni Associa- 
tion at College Park, Md., as second-class matter under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Annual Alumni Association dues are $2.00. One year's subscription to Alumni News, 
50 cents. 

GROUP LEADERS 

Allegany County: E. Brooke Whiting, '98, President; Dr. Joseph Franklin, '21, Secretary, 

Cumberland, Md. 
Baltimore County: C. Walter Cole, '21, President; H. B. Derrick, '17, Secretary, Towson, Md. 
Baltimore City: Chester Tawney, '31, President, 4022 Roland Avenue; E. Gordon Ham- 
mond, '34, Secretary, 1023 W. Barre Street, Baltimore, Md. 
Caroline County: George W. Clendaniel, '20, President, Denton, Md.; Dr. Maurice A. Brackett, 

'21, Treasurer, Denton, Md.; Mrs. George W. Clendaniel, '21, Secretary, Denton, Md. 
Harford County: W. B. Munnikhuysen, '14, President; H. M. Carroll, '20, Secretary, Bel 

Air, Md. 
Frederick County: J. Homer Remsberg, '18, President; Henry R. Shoemaker, '17, Secretary, 

Frederick, Md. 
Montgomery County: Lawrence G. Smoot, '18, President, Kensington, Md.; Mary Fisher, '36, 

Secretary, Rockville, Md. 
New York City: Donald Kieffer, '30, President, 195 Broadway; Sarah Morris, '25, Secretary, 

310 East 44th Street, New York City. 
Philadelphia: A. Moulton McNutt, '06, President, 413 Cooper Street, Camden, N. J.; J. P. 

Mudd, '07, Secretary, 174 Manheim Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Pittsburgh: E. Minor Wenner, '27, President, 1111 Gladys Avenue; Dr. A. A. Krieger, '32, 

Secretary Highland Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Washington, D. C: J. Douglas Wallop, '19, President, 6139 N. Dakota Avenue, N.W.; 

Charles V. Koons, '29, Secretary, 419 Fourth Street, N.E., Washington. 
Washington County: Hon. Henry Holzapfel, Jr., '93, President, Hagerstown, Md.; L. G. 

Mathias, '23, Secretary, Hagerstown, Md. 

"M" CLUB OFFICERS AND BOARD MEMBERS 

Donald H. Adams, '28 President Dr. E. N. Cory, '09 Secretary-Treas. 

A. K. Besley, '23 Vice-President W. R. Maslin, '09 Historian 

REPRESENTATIVES 



Cover Picture 

There are probably few Alumni 
who need to be told that this is the 
main entrance to the campus "On 
the Hill." However, the entrance 
was revamped about nine years ago, 
changing from the former gray stone 
pillars to the brick. The entire wall 
in front of the campus now is con- 
structed of brick, to be in harmony 
with the campus buildings. 

On behalf of the Universitv offi- 
cers the News extends a welcome to 
returning old grads for the Forty- 
seventh Annual Alumni Reunion, 
Friday, June 2. 



G. F. Pollock, '23 Baseball 

H. B. Shipley, '14 Basketball 

Stewart McCaw, '35 Boxing 

James Stevens, '19 Lacrosse 

Lewis W. Thomas, '28 Track 



James Busick, '35 Tennis 

Charles Remsberg, '26 Cross Country 

W. C. Supplee, '26 Football 

Dr. E. B. Friedenwald, '03 i 



Dr. A. W. Valentine, '04 



At Large 



Fellow Alumni 

We have undertaken to give 
you early notice of Alumni 
Day, to be held at College Park 
on Friday, June 2nd, beginning 
about noon and ending after 
midnight. The program is be- 
ing carefully arranged, which 
I believe will be worthwhile 
and enjoyable. There is noth- 
ing I can add except to assure 
you that every effort is being 
made to make this day out- 
standing in the annals of our 
Association. We hope you will 
lend vour support bv being 
present with your family and 
friends. 

Sincerely yours, 

C. Walter Cole, 

President. 



Let's All Get Together 

Friday, June 2, At College Park 



WITH the rising of the sun on 
Friday, June 2nd, the Forty-sev- 
enth Annual Reunion of the Alumni will 
be on. Alumni from every direction will 
be heading for the campus "On the Hill" 
at College Park, where old friends will get 
together; also new ones will be made. 

It is a reunion of all classes, with special 
emphasis being placed on the five-year 
reunion classes, beginning with the hon- 
ored class of the day — the boys of 1889. 
As a feature of the dav this class will raise 
their flag to flv over the campus for a day. 
The other distinguished classes are '94, '99, 
'04, '09, '14, '19, '24, '29, and '34. 
University Open House 

All Alumni will assemble in the Univer- 
sitv Library, where registration and the 
Alumni meeting will be held. The Library 
is on top of the hill, facing east and the 
flag pole. Here ample rest-room facilities 
are available for both men and women. 

The University on this day will have 
open house to the Alumni with Faculty 
representatives remaining in each depart- 
ment to receive and greet the Alumni dur- 
ing the forenoon. That night the Univer- 
sity has made available accommodations in 
the Dormitory for those Alumni desiring 
to stay over night. The cost to be 50 cents 
per person. Reservations must be made in 
advance with Alumni Office. 
Class Reunion 

At 12 noon the flag raising will take 
place at the flag pole when Mr. T. D. Grif- 
fith will pull up the flag of '89. At 1 o'clock 
the General Alumni and Class Reunion 
Luncheon will be held in the University 
Dining Hall; the cost of which will be 
50 cents per person. 

In the afternoon, campus tours, special 
class reunions, and entertainment will keep 
the old grads busy. 



Rossbourg Inn 

At 3:30 the flashy University band will 
present a concert on the lawn of the Ross- 
bourg Inn. Following the concert, special 
dedicatory ceremonies of the Rossbourg 
Inn will be held. This is the oldest and 
most historical building on the University 
campus. It is being restored to its original 
state of more than 150 years ago, and on 
this day it will be dedicated to the spirit 
and tradition of the Alumni. The building 
will be open for inspection, although not 
completed. 

Those who visit the Rossbourg Inn will 
see the old fashioned Innkeeper, who will 
be attired in Colonial dress. Other attend- 
ants and hostesses will also be in Colonial 
dress to greet returning grads and show 
them about the building. An old-fashioned 
registration book will be on hand in which 
those Alumni who return for the dedica- 
tory exercises can register. 

Immediately following the dedicatory ex- 
ercises, the annual Alumni Meeting will be 
called to order in the University Library 
by President C. Walter Cole, '21. Here 
the special business of the Association will 
be disposed of and the officers for the en- 
suing year elected. 

The Dormitory accommodations spoken 
of previously are available for Alumni de- 
siring to remain over night for the cost 
of 50 cents per person. Bed clothing pro- 
vided. There will be a few rooms in certain 
sections of Calvert Hall to take care of an 
Alumnus and his family. Single Alumni 
will be cared for — the women in Margaret 
Brent and the men in Silvester Hall. Res- 
ervation for over-night accommodations 
must be made in advance bv writing the 
Alumni Office. 

'Twill be a great dav. Will vou be 
there? 



Safety Education — The National Edu- 
cation Association has practically put the 
safety education program in the hands of 
Maryland grads. The research assistant in 
this work is Pyke Johnson, Jr., '37, a mem- 
ber of Phi Delta Theta. He now is assist- 
ed by Christine Kcmpton, '36, former edi- 
tor of the Old Line. Christine takes Mar- 
jorie Grinstead's, '36, place, who resigned 
to marry Gerald Krohn of Succasunna, 
New Jersey. A bulletin entitled "Safety 
Education Through Schools" is the result 
of the department's work. 



Birth — Mr. and Mrs. Chester Cissel of 
Lisbon, Maryland, announce the arrival 
of Mary Alice, born March 18th. Chester 
is a member of the Alpha Gamma Rho 
fraternity, and is a graduate of the class 
of '36. His present duties are agriculture 
teaching and athletic instructor in the Lis- 
bon High School. 

O 

Copper — A member of the class of 
1911, Hollis F. Bennett is Vice-President 
of the Seaboard Brass and Copper Com- 
pany of Baltimore. 



Alumni Dinner 

At 6 P. M. the Annual 
Alumni Dinner will be held in 
the University Dining Hall. 
The cost will be $1 per per- 
son. A special program will be 
presented with two interesting 
talks. The principal speaker 
will be the Honorable Millard 
E. Tydings, TO, United States 
Senator from Maryland. The 
author of "Ferdinand," better 
known as "The Sissy Bull," 
Munro Leaf, '27, will also be a 
speaker on the program. A 
high class entertainment will 
be presented by Miss Louise 
Baer, a talented soloist from 
New York. Toastmaster will 
be C. Walter Cole, '21, retiring 
President of the Association. 
Reservations should be made 
in advance. Write now for 
your Alumni Ticket. 

Commencement Ball 

That evening all Alumni 
who attended the Alumni din- 
ner will be guests of the Uni- 
versity at the Seventy-seventh 
Commencement Ball, to be 
held in the University Gymna- 
sium. Music will be render- 
ed by the well-known Ted 
Brownagle and his Orchestra. 
The Ball will be from 9 to 1, 
with dress optional. 



President Of Nicaragua 
Visits Campus 

The itinerary of General Anastasio So- 
moza, President of Nicaragua, while on 
his visit to the United States included a 
dav at the University for the purpose of 
discussing new developments in agricul- 
tural research. President Somoza, seeking 
to modernize farm methods in the Latin- 
American country, had a conference with 
President Byrd and the heads of various 
agricultural units. A tour of the campus, 
the experimental farm, and the Govern- 
ment Station at Bcltsville were included in 
the program. 

When General Somoza arrived on the 
campus, he was met by the Pershing Rifles, 
honorary cadet group, and escorted to the 
President's office. Following lunch he re- 
viewed a parade by the entire R. O. T. C. 
cadet corps in his honor. 



Maryland Alumni News 




Dr. F. B. Bomberger, '94 Wm. D. Groff, '00 



H. D. Watts, '04 



A. C. Dices, '20 



L. G. Mathias, '23 



Presenting The Trustees 

For The Alumni 



Fund 



WITH the thought of furthering 
the progress of the Alumni Asso- 
ciation, President C. Walter Cole, '21, has 
appointed during his tenure of administra- 
tion a board of five trustees to make plans 
for increasing and properly handling of 
the Alumni Fund. This was an idea of 
President Cole several vears ago and when 
he became President he immediately set 
upon the task of finding five Alumni to 
entrust with this task. After considerable 
studv, the following were chosen and pre- 
sented to the Alumni Board for confirma- 
tion. 

The tenure of service of each member is 
for five years, thus adding one new mem- 
ber to the Board each vear. The present 
appointments were made for 5-4-3-2-1, in 
the order named. 



Dr. Bomberger 

Chairman of the Board was selected 
for his many years of service to the Alumni 
Association and his vital interest in its 
welfare. Dr. Frank B. Bomberger, '94, a 
past President of the Alumni Association 
and for manv vears a member of the Fac- 
ulty, was asked to act in this capacity. He 
actually does not need any introduction to 
those Alumni who attended the University 
prior to his resignation to become Presi- 
dent of the Baltimore Bank of Coopera- 
tives. To those who are recent graduates, 
you will find it a pleasure to return on 
Alumni Dav to meet Dr. Bomberger, a man 
who amplifies a real interest in the Alumni 
Association and his Alma Mater. Dr. Bom- 
May, 1939 



berger will serve for five vears on the 
Board. 

W. D. Groff 
The next appointment, William D. 
Groff, '00, is an Alumnus with, as far as 
we know, an unchallenged record of at- 
tendance at Alumni reunions. He has not 
missed an Alumni reunion since he gradu- 
ated and he also states he will never miss 
any as long as he has anything to sav 
about it. "Billy'' Groff, as he is more fa- 
miliarly known, lives at Owings Mills, 
Maryland, where he has developed an out- 
standing farm service business. A few vears 
ago his interest doubled when his son, 
"Billv, Jr.," entered the University and 
became a lacrosse star. 

H. D. Watts 

Four years later there graduated a man 
destined to become a successful engineer, 
Harry D. Watts, '04, better known to his 
classmates as Major Harry. Today he is 
vice-president of the James Stewart Con- 
struction Company, one of the leading 
companies in the field. At the present his 
company has the construction of four 
buildings in the University building pro- 
gram. He resides in New York City and 
maintains a very active interest in the 
Alumni group there. 

A. C. Diggs 

We go into Baltimore for the next mem- 
ber and find him associated with a finan- 
cial concern in charge of investments, Aus- 
tin C. Diggs, '20. Ever since graduation 
Austin has been a financier and his success 
in the field has established his prestige as 



one who is very capable to serve on this 
Board. Those Alumni prior to his gradua- 
tion who ever attended an athletic contest 
remember this young man, who could get 
a crowd to give an athletic team more sup- 
port than probably any other person. It 
was his personality and as he has not lost 
those youthful attributes, President Cole is 
expecting his leadership to add a lot of 
support to this project. 

L. G. Mathias 

The youngest member of this illustrious 
Board is Leonard G. Mathias, '23, of Ha 
gerstown, Maryland. "Matty," as he is 
called by familiar friends, has proven his 
ability as a successful business man by the 
way he has conducted a flourishing busi- 
ness in Hagerstown. He is one of the most 
influential young business men of that city. 
It is his native town and immediately fol- 
lowing graduation he returned home to 
enter business with his brother. When the 
Alumni needed organizing in Washington 
County it was "Matty" who put his shoul- 
der to the wheel and gave the organiza- 
tion a boost. He was elected Secretary and 
has managed several successful gatherings. 
His business ability along with his expe- 
rience lends much to the prestige of this 
Board. 

As one reviews the personnel of this 
Board they will see that President Cole 
was conscious of several needed attributes. 
I lowever, the two most outstanding are 
probably personality and popularity of 
these men among their fellow Alumni, as 
well as their real ability in handling fin- 
ances in a most creditable wav. This Board 
will have full charge of this fund and a 
statement as to their proposed policies will 
be forthcoming as soon as a meeting is 
held. 



5 




Arriving 



Being Entertained 



Departinc 



General Washington Visits Rossbourg Inn 



In more ways than one, the Rossbourg 
Inn has been attracting wide attention. 
The Alumni will be interested to know 
that General Washington has now actu- 
ally stopped at the Inn. It was during the 
re-enactment of his trip to New York for 
his inauguration as the first President of 
his country that stopping at the Rossbourg 
Inn was part of his itinerary. The Inn in 
the early days was the first stage coach 
stop out of Washington enroute to Balti- 
more. This is what the recent trip of "Gen- 
eral Washington" included. His coach 
pulled up at the Inn for a brief rest and a 
change of horses. Here the "General" was 
met by several officers of his Continental 
Army and a few charming ladies of the 
vicinity. All were appropriately dressed in 
Colonial costumes. The General was re- 
ceived and escorted to the Inn, where he 
was served ale by the innkeeper. After a 
brief pause and a few chats, the "General" 
was on his way. 

All of this was a part of "General Wash- 
ington's" trip to New York to re-enact his 
inauguration as a part of the opening cer- 
emonies of the World's Fair. The pictures 
above show "General Washington" arm- 
ing at the Inn, then being entertained, and 
as he left. It was a colorful pageant and in 
addition to a few still pictures being taken, 
a movie of his visit was made. 



Improving — Dean Adele Stamp, '24, 
has been for sometime under the doctor's 
care, but we are glad to report that she 
is improving nicelv. She was in Florida but 
has returned to the campus for the final 
events of the year. 



New York's World Fair 
Academy Of Sports 

When the Academy of Sports held their 
dedicatory ceremonies at the World's Fair 
in New York on Monday, May 1, Maryland 
was reperesented by Lyman Oberlin, '17, 
one of the Old Line all-time tackles. Col- 
leges from thirteen of the original States 
were represented for the formal opening, 
conducted by Christy Walsh and his asso- 
ciates. The World's Fair Golden Laurel, 
awarded to the outstanding athlete of 1938, 
was presented to Don Budge. Short talks 
were made by Babe Ruth, Jim Crowley, 
and Captain Eddie Rickenbacker. 

Each college represented raised their 
flag with proper and dignified ceremony. 
Among the colleges represented were: 
Yale, Harvard, Army, Fordham, New York 
U., Columbia, Manhattan, Princeton, Vir- 
ginia, Brown, North Carolina, South Caro- 
lina, Pennsylvania, Georgia, Delaware and 
Maryland. 



Married — The well-known John Wal- 
ter Street, III, '33, Engineer, has taken unto 
himself a wife, Miss Beatrice Dohrman, of 
Ridgewood, N. J. This all happened Feb- 
ruary 18. John is with the Wright Aero- 
nautical Corporation, Paterson, N. J. He 
is a member of Phi Delta Theta. 
O 

Cumberland — Janet T. Anderson, '37, 
a graduate in the College of Education with 
first honors and membership in Phi Kappa 
Phi, now is an English teacher in the Al- 
legany High School in Cumberland, Md. 



Soils — A recent visitor to the campus 
was one George Cole, '33, now with the 
Soil Conservation program of West Vir- 
ginia, with headquarters at Moundsville. 
George, a member of Sigma Nu and a 
former lacrosse star, married Miss Betty 
Story of Washington. They are doing 
very good for the gridiron machine about 
1957 as there are two boys in the family — 
George, Jr., and John Joseph. The latter 
arrived February 14 last. 
O 

"X" Ray — Mary Harbaugh Campbell, 
'25, a member of Kappa Delta, now is lo- 
cated at the Emergency Hospital in Wash- 
ington, D. C. Mary is a specialist in the 
"X" Ray department. 
O 

Birth— On January 14th, 1939, there 
arrived in the home of Dr. and Mrs. John 
E. Savage a baby boy named John E., Jr. 
Mrs. Savage is the former Miss Louise 
Tcwnsend, '30, a member of Kappa Kap- 
pa Gamma sorority, and former Women's 
Editor of The Diamondback in her junior 
and senior years. Jack, '28, as his brothers 
in Phi Sigma Kappa call him, is a former 
Student Government president. Dr. Sav- 
age is now a practicing physician in Balti- 
more City. The Savages reside at 4904 
Woodside Road, Baltimore, Md. 
O 

Parker Lindsay, Maryland's all-America 
midfield attack star last year, is a member 
of the Baltimore A. C. squad, but did not 
play against the Terps at College Park 
May 6. He's still taking work at Maryland 
and also helping to coach the frosh stick 
team . 



Maryland Alumni News 



Old Liners In New York 




New York Group Have 
Annual Get-Together 

A splendid meeting of the New York 
Alumni Group was held April 15, at which 
time Dr. H. C. Byrd, '08; C Walter Cole. 
'21, President of the Alumni, and Honor- 
ahle Munro Leaf, '2~, were the guests of 
honor and made splendid talks. Dr. Byrd 
gave an inside story on what the University 
was doing and planned to do. President 
Cole spoke about the Alumni Association, 
and Munro Leaf told about the origin of 
the sissv bull, "Ferdinand," of which lie 
was the author. 

Toastmaster for the occasion was Harrv 
D. Watts, '04, vice-president of the James 
Stewart Construction Company. As usual, 
Major Harry was at top form as master of 
ceremonies. A very enjovable evening was 
had by all. 

Dingman, '21, Elected 
A short business meeting of the group 
was held for the election of officers for 
the ensuing year. Fred B. Rakeman, '18, 
chairman of the nominating committee, 
presented the slate, which was unanimously 
elected. James E. Dingman, '21, now with 
the American Telephone and Telegraph 
Company, was elected President. He suc- 
ceeds J. Donald Kieffer, '30, who revived 
and reorganized the Group into a successful 
organization. 

Xot enough in the way of praise can be 
said about Don for the way he has given 
generously of his time in keeping the 
Group such an active organization. Shortly 
after going to New York following grad- 
uation, Don became interested in the 



Grapevine News About Those We Know 



4 H Clubs — Assistant Director of Boys' 
and Girls' 4 H Clubs is Mylo Downey, '27, 
former manager of the baseball team in 
1927. Mylo now is stationed on the cam- 
pus and lives in Calvert Hills. 


Teacher — John C. Barto, '29, a gradu- 
ate in Engineering, has been appointed 
Industrial Education teacher in the Spar- 
rows Point High School. John has had 
several years' practical experience in in- 
dustry since graduation, preparing for this 
work. 



Alumni Group. Even though some trying 
times have arisen, his enthusiasm has never 
waned and by his tenacious efforts, with 
the help of several cooperative fellow 
workers, the Group has remained the most 
active in the Association. In recognition of 
his enthusiasm and adaptability in organ- 
izing he was elected as a member of the 
Alumni Board last year. 

Another member elected to office in the 
Group was Sarah Morris, '24, Secretary 
Treasurer. 

Other officers were: Vice-President, from 
West Chester, Pa., Dr. Norwood Thorn- 
ton, '27; Vice-President, from New Jersey, 
Malcolm Rich, '21; Vice-President, from 
Long Island, Gordon Kessler, '29; Report- 
er, James T. Knotts, '24; Executive Com- 
mittee — -Lyman D. Oberlin, '17; Dr. Louis 
V. Hayes, '18; Fred B. Rakeman, '18, and 
J. Don Kieffer, '30. 



1908— The class of 1908 never lets up. 

Another letter has been circulated among 

the class members about the great reunion 

last year and the possibilities of another 

one this year. This class does not wait for 

the five-year reunion, but get together each 

year 

O 

Schools — Superintendent of Schools for 
Queen Anne's County is Franklin D. Day, 
'IS, a member of Kappa Alpha fraternity. 
He married Miss Elizabeth Hook, '20, one 
of Maryland's first women graduates. They 
reside at Centreville, Maryland. 



Engineer — II. Roland Devillbiss, '11, of 
Riverdale, Maryland, is a civil engineer for 
tin Suburban Sanitary Area of Washing- 
ten, D. C. 

O 

To Wed — Member of class of '38 to 
wed in June. Mary Martha Heaps, a mem- 
ber of Kappa Kappa Gamma and Pete 
Costello of Baltimore. 



Buick — Recent news says Charles B. 
Molster, '22, has been promoted to the 
position of Sales Manager for the Maple 
Buick, Inc., a division of General Motors 
oi South Orange, N. J. Charley is a for- 
mer gridiron and baseball star of the Old 
Liner, and is a member of the Kappa 
Alpha fraternity. His address is 147 South 
Orange Avenue, South Orange, N. J. 



May, 1939 



Class Of 1914 

To Hold 

Quarter Century 
Reunion 



& 



All Five-Year Classes 
Convening 

A quarter of a century is not a long time 
if you say it quick, nor does it seem like 
long ago when you begin to reminisce, but 
many things can happen in twenty-five 
years. The latter is what the members of 
the Class of 1914 propose to find out about 
on Friday, June 2, 1939. 

They are going to get together at this 
time and have a real class reunion, talk 
over old times, find out what each has 
been doing, and make plans for the next 
twenty years. 

All those former students who were 
members of that class, whether they attend- 
ed one, two, or three years, are invited to 
attend. 

Register 

First they are going to assemble at the 
registration headquarters, then they will 
have lunch and a good old fashioned gab 



Engaged — Members of '37 to carry on 
together. Janet Weideman, a Kappa Kap- 
pa Gamma and former Women's Editor 
of The Diamondback, and William G. 
Crampton, a Sigma Nu, plan to wed this 

fall. 

O 

Accountant — Ernest Eaton, '36, Kappa 
Alpha, is an accountant with the General 
Motors Corporation in Baltimore, Mary- 
land. 




fest. J. B. Grav, President, assisted by R. 
V. Truitt and E. P. Williams, are making 
plans to keep every 'fourteener busy from 
morning until night. Thev have circular- 
ized the class and a possible one hundred 
per cent, return is indicated. 

Now other classes are making great 
plans also. The class of '89 will reign su- 
preme as the fiftieth anniversary flag flies 
over the campus. Then '94 will be next 
followed by the boys of '99. The young 
men of '04 say that their reunion will top 
them all, as they are making a two-day 
affair, possibly three. And maybe four. 
'29 And '34 

Those of '09 will be on hand with their 
usual spirit and gentlemen of '19 indicate 
a rip-roaring time, recalling old days. Now 



Birth— Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Gifford, 
'31, have a young daughter, Elizabeth Ann, 
born November, 1938. Mrs. Gifford is the 
former Miss Elizabeth Minis, a member 
of Kappa Alpha Delta, Phi Kappa Phi, 
and the Women's Senior Honor Society. 
"Bill" Gifford is a member of Lambda 
Chi Alpha, and is now employed by the 
American Radiator Company in Wash- 
ington, D. C. 



Cooperatives — A promotion has ele- 
vated Paul Mullinix, '36, formerly store 
manager for the Southern States Cooper- 
atives, to that of District Manager, with 
headquarters at 211 East Main Street, Elk- 
ton, Md. 



'24, with Sarah Morris at the top and 
Charlie Prince helping, are making strides. 
Next in line are those of '29, who are 
rearing to go. It looks like a real contest 
between '29 and '34, "Dintv" Koons of 
the former and "South" Sothoron of the 
latter. Both are on the ball and have large 
committees at work. Maybe a tug-of-war 
will be necessary to settle the issue. How- 
ever, they are going to show the younger 
classes how to have a get-together. This 
should be a real reunion. Do not miss it! 



To Wed — News is out that June Barnes- 
ley, '36, and John Simpson, '35, will be 
married May 27 in San Antonio, Texas. 
June, a member of Kappa Kappa Gamma 
and a former May Queen, will soon be 
heading West. John has been taking a 
course in the Army Flying School in Texas 
and will graduate on May 26. It is under- 
stood that his first detail will be in Hono- 
lulu. John, a member of Kappa Alpha, is 
well remembered for his football prowess. 
Norwood Sothoron is expected to be the 
best man at the wedding — second best, 

savs "John." 

O 

Engagement — Recently announced was 
the engagement of E. Robert Kent, '34, to 
Miss Marian Mueller of Baltimore, who is 
a graduate of Goucher College. Plans are 
for a wedding in the fall. Bob is in the 
air-conditioning business in Baltimore, a 
division of Carrier Corporation. 



8 



Maryland Alumni News 



Old Line Athletic Contributions 



By W. H. ("Bill") HOTTEL: 



Terp Teams Making 
Great Record 



BULLETIN NOTE: 

Maryland loses to Hopkins in 
lacrosse, 6 to 3- Wins baseball 
game from Georgetown, 4-0. 

WITH the schedules in their last 
stages, Maryland's Spring sports 
teams were well on their way to one of 
the best seasons ever enjoyed by the Col- 
lege Park outdoor combinations. 

Pacing the teams are the tracksters, who 
have gone undefeated in dual meets, a 
63-63 tie with Dartmouth in the opener 
being followed by triumphs oyer four 
Southern Conference rivals and George- 
town. 

The Terps made a remarkable record in 
the 48 running events in the dual meets, 
losing only four races, two in the Dart- 
mouth meet and one each in the games 
with Washington and Lee and George- 
town, Halbert Evans, senior hurdler, set 
the only University record when he nego- 
tiated the 220-yard highs in 23.8. 

Eddie Miller, senior high jumper, led 
in the field events with a clean slate, but 
there were plenty of fine performances all 
down the line. 

Ball Team Formidable 

The Terp ball team, with a record of 14 
wins in 18 starts, and 5 out of 6 in the 
Southern Conference fight, probably is the 
top team in the section and one that has 
played interesting ball from the start. 

Earl Springer, lefthander from Hagers- 
town, and Pershing Mondorff, big right- 
hander from Emmitsburg, have done the 
bulk of pitching and have shown to be in 
the class with the best college hurlers. 

Hugh Keller, brother of the now well 
noted Charley, has been leading hitter of 
a well-balanced team. 

Their Conference record gives the Terps 
a good chance to carry off championship 
honors, with Duke and Richmond as the 
other top contenders. Maryland beat both 
of these teams to give them their first 
Conference defeats of the season. It was 
Duke's first defeat in 26 games and the 
Blue Devils since then have gone on an- 
other streak. 

May, 1939 



SMASHES RECORD IN HURDLES 




Halbert Evans 

Terps' senior timber-topper, who stepped the 220-yard highs in 23.8 in a meet with 
William and Mary on April 22. This lowered by 8/10ths oi a second the mark 
of 24.6 made by Bob She in 1934. Incidentally, She's mark was set in a meet 
with William and Man'. Evans also is a consistent winner in the 120-yard highs. 



Lacrosse Ten Balanced 

The lacrosse team, despite heavy losses 
of 1938 stars, has proved one of the most 
powerful ever to wear the Old Gold and 
Black, the ten being well balanced, though 
not studded with outstanding performers. 
Rip Hewitt, in home, and Jim Meade, sec- 
ond attack, who have acted as joint cap- 
tains in all the games, are the only seniors 
who are regulars. 

Hewitt, incidentally, is the leading scor- 
( Continued on Page 10) 



Field Day Probably 
Best Ever Held 

Maryland's Twenty-second Annual Field 
Day, held May 6, was one of the best and 
mavbe the best ever staged in the long 
series, for the trophy and individual com- 
petition was keener and closer than in any 
previous set of games. 

Washington-Lee High of Ballston, Va., 
won the open interscholastic trophy with 
(Continued on Page 10) 



■■• 



F> 



i> 



j^ 



- 






Another Dorm For The Boys; 

Buildings Under Way 



>evera 



lOth 



er 



You have here a picture of the latest 
additions to the Men's Dormitories. This is 
just one of the several new buildings now 
being constructed on the campus — a real 
treat for every Alumnus to come back and 
see a progressing Alma Mater. 

This new dorm is located on the south 
side of the campus, facing north and ex- 
tends from Silvester Hall toward the Gym- 
nasium. The dormitory increase called for 
the Dining Hall expansion which is keep- 
ing pace and will be ready for use in the 
fall. Other new buildings to see will be 
an addition to the Engineering, a new 
Home Economics, Administration, Poul- 
try, and General Service Buildings. The 



Rossbourg Inn has been renovated and 
will be open and dedicated on Alumni 
Day. 

Arboretum 

In addition to the buildings we want 
to call your attention to the Arboretum, 
located on Paint Branch at the far north 
side of the campus. Many new sights can 
be seen in a trip through the campus ad- 
dition. 

Any Alumnus will have a full day of 
sight-seeing, meeting old friends, and par- 
ticipating in the many events planned. 
Don't forget the day, Friday, June 2, at 
College Park. 



. . Qrapevine J\fews . . 

Iowa — Good news has been received 
about Bob Straka, '24, who is in Ames, 
Iowa, Mr. and Mrs. Straka announce the 
arrival of a baby boy weighing 7 pounds, 
11 ounces (a halfback in the making). 
Mrs. Straka was formerly Miss Ruth Cow- 
fare of Ames, Iowa. 

Bob is with the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture and second in com- 
mand at the By-Products Laboratory in 
Ames. In addition to his work, Bob earned 
his Ph.D. at Iowa State last year. 



Married — He tumbled at last! On April 
22, Robert Forrest, '18, married Miss 
Irene Sargeant Harwood in Miami, Flor- 
ida. Bob is a leader in the Southern Mary- 
land American Legion and a Prince George 
County Delegate in the State Legisla- 
ture. 



Terp Teams Making Good 

(Continued from Page 9) 
cr with a total of 26 goals, which puts him 
far ahead, but 11 others have scored, il- 
lustrating the attacking balance of the 
team. 

Navy was among the teams beaten, as 
the only loss in the first eight games was 
a 6-5 defeat by Baltimore A. C. 

With 5 wins in 8 matches, the tennis 
team has done fully as well, if not better 
than was expected. In fact, it was pointed 
out at the start of the season, that a 50-50 
record was about all that could be hoped 
for, in view of the toughness of the sched- 
ule. 

Making Great Showing 

When this was written, the four varsity 
teams had scored a total of 3 1 victories and 
a tie out of 39 contests, a better than 75 
per cent. pace. 

The yearling baseball, track, lacrosse and 
tennis squads also had won 13 of 15 con- 
tests. 



Field Day Probably 
Best Ever Held 

(Continued from Page 9) 
24 points, with Wallv Legg their ace ath- 
lete, getting 18 of them. Sixteen other 
teams figured in the scoring. 
Bel Air Is Leader 

Bel Air, by virtue of a relay race vic- 
tory, earned the trophy in the section 
closed to county high schools of the State 
with 23 points, but Allegany and Hagers- 
town, with 15 and 14, respectively, were 
in the running until the last event. 

In all, eight records were either broken 
or tied. J. Gaffney of Allegany was one of 
the outstanding performers. He won the 
county shot put with a record heave of 47 
feet, 1 inch, was third in both the 100 and 
220-yard dashes and took the open inter- 
scholastic javelin throw with a heave of 
174 feet, 4 inches. L. Shaner, a teammate, 
nosed out Gaffnev for the individual coun- 
ty trophy bv one point with a win in the 
440-yard dash and a second in the broad 
jump. 

Varsity Teams Shine 

Maryland's varsity teams made the day 
a big one by taking 3 of 4 events in which 
they took part. The nine beat Washing- 
ton College, 5-3; the track team downed a 
strong Washington and Lee squad, 77-49; 
the tennis outfit blanked Catholic U., 9 
to 0, but the lacrosse combination lost a 
6-5 verdict to Baltimore A. C, though 
generally outplaying the Clubmen. 

Uncanny stops by Frank Christhilf, for- 
mer Terp, playing goalie for B. A. C, was 
the main reason for the reverse. Maryland 
actually had 39 shots to B. A. C.'s 24. 

Dietician — Catherine E. Aitcheson, '36, 
of Laurel, Maryland, is a dietician at the 
Springfield State Hospital at Sykesville, 
Maryland. 



10 



Maryland Alumni News 



University of Maryland 



COMMENCEMENT iaaa 
WEEK PROGRAM L&tDsJ 



Baltimore School 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 
HURSDAY, JUNE 1ST — 
9.00 A.M. — Medical Alumni Association Registration, 

Main Univcrsitv Building. 
10.00 A.M. to 12.00 Noon— Inspection of University Hos- 
pital and Clinics. 
1.00 P.M. — Luncheon, Nurses' Dining Room. 
2.00 P.M. — Annual Meeting of the Medical Alumni As- 
sociation. University Hospital. 
3.00 to 6.00 P.M.— Class Reunions. 
7.00 P.M. — Annual Banquet. Lord Baltimore Hotel. 
RIDAY. JUNE 2ND — 
8.00 P.M. — Pre Commencement Exercises. Lyric Theater. 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 

THURSDAY. JUNK 1ST — 

9.00 A.M.— Senior Prize Contests, Dental Clinic. 
10.00 A.M. — Symposium on Oral Surgery, Dental School 

Building. 
12.30 P.M.— Senior Class Assembly, Dental School Bldg. 
1.00 P.M. — Luncheon, Longfellow Hotel. 
1.30 P.M. — Golf Tournament, Five Farms Course, Balti- 
more Country Club. 
2.00 P.M. — Entertainment of visiting ladies. 
7.00 P.M. — Senior Class Banquet and Dance, and Class 
Reunion Dinners. 
FRIDAY. JUNE 2ND — 

10.00 A.M. to 12.00 Noon— Lectures, Dental School Bldg. 
12.00 Noon — Annua] Business Meeting, National Alumni 
Association . 
2.00 to 5.00 P.M.— Table Clinics. Dental School Building. 
7.00 P.M. — Annual Banquet and Dance of National Alum- 
ni Association. 

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

MONDAY. MAY 29 TH — 

8.00 P.M. to 2. 00 A.M.— Senior Banquet and Prom. 
L'Hirondelle Club, Ruxton, Md. 
WEDNESDAY. MAY 3 1ST — 

6.50 P.M. — Annual Meeting of the Alumni Association, 

Hotel Emerson. 
7.00 P.M. — Banquet of Alumni Association and Graduat- 
ing Class, Hotel Emerson. 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

FRIDAY. MAY 261 II — 

7.00 P.M. — Senior Dinner and Cap Stringing, Nurses' 



College Park School 

SUNDAY, MAY 2STII — 

11.00 A.M. — Baccalaureate Exercises, Auditorium, Agricul- 
tural Building. Sermon by the Rev. Fred G. 
Holloway, B.D., D.D., ' LL.D., President. 
\\ estern Maryland College. 
4.00 P.M. to 5.00 P.M.— Dean's Tea for the Home Econom- 
ics Seniors, Iron Gate Inn, Washington, D. C. 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 3 1ST — 

2.30 P.M. — Award of Commissions, Reserve Officers' 

Training Corps, U. S. Army, Library Green. 
3.00 P.M. — Assembly for Honors and Awards, Library 

Green. 
6.30 P.M. — Senior Class Banquet, Beaver Dam Country 

Club. 
9.00 P.M. — Rossbourg Dance, University Gymnasium. 

THURSDAY, JUNE 1ST — 

5.00 P.M. — Dean of Women's Buffet Supper, Women's 

Field House. 
9.00 P.M. — Junior Senior German, University Gymnasium. 

FRIDAY, JUNE 2ND — 

12.30 P.M.— Senior Class Outing. 
1.00 P.M. — Alumni and Class Reunion Luncheon, Dining 

Hall. 
2.00 P.M.— Class Reunions. 
3.3(1 P.M. — Band Concert, Rossbourg Inn. 
4.30 P.M. — Dedicator}- Ceremonies by Alumni, Rossbourg 

Inn. 
5.00 P.M. — Annual Meeting of the Alumni Association. 

Library. 
6.30 P.M. — Annual Alumni Dinner, Dining Hall. 
9.00 P.M. — June Ball, University Gymnasium. 



ALL SCHOOLS 

SATURDAY, JUNE 3RD — 

11.00 A.M. — Commencement Exercises, Ritchie Coliseum, 
College Park. 



Dining Room. 
THURSDAY, JUNE 1ST — 

.30 P.M. — Alumnae Banquet, Hotel Emerson. 

FRIDAY. JUNE 2ND — 

10.00 A.M. — Corporate Communion, Old St. Paul's 
Church, Charles and Saratoga Streets. 





( . . the catch of the season 
r more smoking pleasure 

In every part of the country 
smokers are turning to Chesterfields 
for what they really want in a ciga- 
rette . . . refreshing mildness . . . better taste 
. . . and a more pleasing aroma. 



rn 




ALUMNI 
NEWS 



JUNE 
1939 









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Volume XI 



MARYLAND ALUMNI NEWS, JUNE, 1939 



Number 



Alumni Association — University of Maryland 

Founded in 1892 



OFFICERS FOR 1939 --10 

Charles W. Sylvester, '08, President 
Baltimore, Md. 

P. W. Chichester, '20, First Vice-President Frederick, Md. 

H. W. Burnside, '04, Second Vice-President Washington, D. C. 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Secretary-Treasurer College Park, Md. 

ALUMNI BOARD 
(Note — The officers named above are also members "I the Alumni Board) 

J. Donald Kiehfer, '30 Arts and Sciences 

Charles V. Koons, '29 Engineering 

R. R. Lewis, '19 Education 

John 1 A. Silkman, '35 Agriculture 

Ruth Miles, '31 Home Economics 

Norwood Sothoron, '34 Commerce 

MEMBERS AT LARGE 

E. E. Powell, '13; Philip Wertheimer, '29 Aden's Representatives 

Mary York Gadd, '28; Gertrude Chesnut, '26 Women's Representatives 

C. Walter Cole, '21 Immediate Past President 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Editor 

Maryland Alumni News, issued monthly by the University of Maryland Alumni Associa- 
tion at College Park, Md., as second-class matter under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Annual Alumni Association dues are $2.(10. One year's subscription to Alumni News, 
50 cents. 

GROUP LEADERS 

ALLEGANY COUNTY: E. Brooke Whitting, '98, President; Dr. Joseph Franklin. "21, Secretary, 
Cumberland, Md. 

BALTIMORE COUNTY: C. Walter Cole, '21, President; H. B. Derrick. '17, Secretary, Towson. 
Maryland. 

BALTIMORE CITY: Chester Tawney. '31. President, 4022 Roland Avenue; E. Gordon Ham- 
mond. '34. Secretary. 1023 W. Barre Street, Baltimore, Md. 

CAROLINE COUNTY: George W. Clendaniel. '20, President; Dr. Maurice A. Brackett, '21. 
Treasurer; Mrs. George W. Clendaniel. '21, Secretary, all of Denton, Md. 

HARFORD COUNTY: W. B. Munnikhuysen, '14, President; H. M. Carroll. '20. Secretary. 
Bel Air, Md. 

FREDERICK COUNTY: J. Homer Remsberg. '18. President; Henry R. Shoemaker. '17. Sec- 
retary. Frederick. Md. 

MONTGOMERY COUNTY: Lawrence G. Smoot, '18. President. Kensington. Md.; Mary Fisher. 
'36. Secretary, Rockville, Md. 

NEW YORK CITY: Donald Kieffer. '30. President. 195 Broadway; Sarah Morris. '25, Secretary. 
310 East 44th Street, New York City. 

PHILADELPHIA: A. Moulton McNutt. '06. President, 413 Cooper Street, Camden, N. J.; J. P. 
Mudd. '07, Secretary, 174 Manheim Street, Philadelphia. Pa. 

PITTSBURGH: E. Minor Wenner, '27, President. 1111 Gladys Avenue; Dr. A. A. Krieger, '32, 
Secretary Highland Building, Pittsburgh. Pa. 

WASHINGTON. D. C: J. Douglas Wallop. '19, President. 6139 N. Dakota Avenue, N.W.; 
Charles V. Koons. '29. Secretary. 419 Fourth Street. N.E., Washington. 

WASHINGTON COUNTY: Hon. Henry Holzapfel, Jr., '93. President, Hagerstown, Md.; L. G. 
Mathias. '23. Secretary. Hagerstown, Md. 



"M" CLUB OFFICERS AND BOARD MEMBERS 



Donald H. Ad wis, 
A. K. Beslev, '23 



. . . . President 
Vice-President 



Dr. E. N. Cory, '0'' 
W. R. Maslin, '09. . 



Secretary-Treas. 

. . Historian 



REPRESENTATIVES 



G. F. Pollock, '23 Baseball 

H. B. Shipley, '14 Basketball 

Stewart McCaw, '35 Boxing 

Fames Stevens, '\'> Lacrosse 

Li wis W. Thomas. '28 Track 



Fames Busick, '35 Tennis 

Charles Remsberg, '26 Cross Country 

W. C Suppi.ee, '26 . Football 

Dr. E. B. Friedenwald, '03 \ 
Dr. A. W. Valentini . '04 \ 



At Large 



Cover Picture 

Few need to be told this is the 
walk leading up to the hill from the 
main gateway. This shady stretch is 
a most inviting section on these hot 
summer days, especially to the Sum 
mcr School attendants, who believe 
the hottest weather is during the 
summer session. 



Snapshots Of Alumni Day 

( Opposite Page ) 

Top row shows the flag-raising by 
R. M. Pindell, '89. In the center he 
talks with Fletcher P. Veitch, '91. 

Second row— Congressman Cole. 
'10, presents gift to Professor C. S. 
Richardson. Dr. Byrd talks with 
members of '04. 

Third row — Freddie Waldman, 
'39, as a colonial dame, stands at the 
door of the Rossbourg Inn to greet 
Alumni. Dr. Skinner inspects build- 
ing. 

Fourth row— Members of '04 ar- 
riving for registration. In center the 
Maslin family-Dad, '09, Peggy, '39. 
and Bill, now a sopohomore. Mem- 
bers of '24, '29 and '30 exchange 
greetings. 

Fifth row — Alumni arriving at 
headquarters — center, Munro Leaf, 
'27, telling about his Ferdinand at 
the banquet. Wharton brothers con- 
gratulate the Trundle twins follow 
ing graduation. 

Bottom row— Tydings speaking to 
Alumni. Members of '19 arrive for 
reunion. 



Alumni Day Attracts Many; 
Sylvester, '08, Elected 

President, Friday, June 2 



It was dark and damp as far as the 
weather was concerned on Friday, June 2, 
but not for the returning grads. All were 
set for a grand and glorious reunion — and 
thev had it! 

The honored guest of the day was the 
Honorable Robert M. Pindell, Jr.. who 
celebrated the fiftieth anniversary of his 
class of 1889. Carrying on the tradition of 
raising the flag of half-century classes, orig- 
inated by the Honorable Melvin C. Hazen, 
'88, first President of the Alumni Associa- 
tion, was the first act of Mr. Pindell. He 
was assisted by Dr. H. C. Byrd, '08, Miss 
Sarah Morris, '24, and the youngest grad- 
uate. Miss Peggy Maslin, '39. a daughter 
of W. B. Maslin of '09. 

Registration for the returning Alumni 
was held in the University Library. Here 
the other reunion classes chalked up their 
list of members as they arrived. 

Pindell Luncheon Speaker 

At 1 P. M. they all met at the Univer- 
sity Dining Hall for lunch. Here the spirit 
of the day began with the singing of 
school songs, led by Harlan Randall, Di- 
rector of Music. C. \\ 'alter Cole, '21, Pres- 
ident of the Association, presided and 
called on the past presidents and the classes 
who were holding special five-year reunions 
terminating with the honor class of the 
day, 1SS9. The representative of the class, 
Mr. Pindell, Jr., was asked to give a few 
remarks, which were very inspiring and in- 
dicative of the great Alumni loyalty and en- 
thusiasm which remains in one's heart for 
their Alma Mater for half a century. 

Dr. Bvrd, 'OS, followed with greetings 
for the returning grads and praised Mr. 
Pindell for his great spirit and admiration 
for his Alma Mater. 

Class Reunions 

In the afternoon various class reunions 
were held and many swapped yarns about 
their campus days. The class of '94 had a 
very good return for their forty-fifth re- 
union, with the boys of '99 joining them 
in making it a get-together for the boys 
of the nineties. 

Not to be outdone bv any class, the boys 
of "04 began their thirty-fifth reunion the 
night before with a banquet. Those of '09 
returned in goodly numbers for their thir- 
tieth anniversary. 

Those to turn on the heat were the lads 



of '14, who were just passing the quarter- 
century point. Close on their heels for a 
real return were those of 1919. These boys 
said this reunion was just a forerunner to 
a real twenty-fifth reunion. 

Not until the president of '24 arrived 
did thev feel like a reunion, but when 
Sarah Morris, president of the class ap- 
peared, the reunion was on. Those younger 
lads in '29 and '34 seemed to be having 
a race for numbers. It was thought at one 
time a tug-of war would be necessary to 
decide the issue. 

All reunion classes gave fair warning 
that other classes had better start now for 
their reunion as they are making big plans 
for the next episode in their history. 

Rossbourg Inn 

At 3:30 o'clock the University Band be- 
gan a concert at the Rossbourg Inn and 
the doors of this historical structure opened 
for visitors. Several hundred Alumni and 
friends of the University inspected the 
renovation now in progress. 

Because of the rain the Dedicatory Ex- 
ercises of the old structure as associated 
with thousands of Alumni who have known 
it as the landmark of years gone bv, were 
held in the old dining room in the rear of 



Cave Man Visits Campus 

This past spring, George Chapman, '20, 
of Shenandoah Caverns, Va., visited the 
campus. With him was his son, who might 
attend Maryland. 

George operates the Shenandoah Cav- 
erns and welcome is on the mat for all 
Old Liners to stop by and see him. On 
several occasions, athletic teams enroute to 
Lexington, Va., have stopped to see George 
and were very much pleased with his cav- 
erns. 



POSITION OPEN 

There is a position open for a Di 
rccting Engineer with the Boy Scouts 
of America. An engineering graduate 
who is interested should write the 
Alumni Office at once. Must have had 
considerable Scout experience. 



the main building. A more detailed de- 
scription of the exercises appears elsewhere j 
in this issue. 

Following the exercises the annual meet- 
ing of the Association convened in the 
main reading room of the library. In addi- 
tion to the general order of business, Pres- 
ident Cole presented the five trustees ap- 
pointed by him for the Alumni Fund. The 
elections of officers for the ensuing year 
were held. Charles \V. Sylvester, '08, Vice- 
President last year, was elected President 
for 1939-40. Immediately following the 
election, past President Cole turned the I 
meeting over to President Sylvester, who 
asked for a motion of adjournment so they 
could be on time for the Alumni Dinner. 
Alumni Dinner 

At 6:30 the annual Alumni Dinner be- 
gan in the Dining Hall with a splendid 
return of old grads and a large attendance 
of faculty and friends. Senator Millard E. 
Tydings, '10, and Munro Leaf, '27, were 
the guest speakers for the occasion. An ac- 
count appears elsewhere. 

After the dinner all Alumni attending 
the dinner were guests of the University 
at the Seventy-Seventh Annual Commence- 
ment Ball. 

Among those present for the day: 
W. T. L. Taliaferro, College Park, Md. 

Class of '88— McDonell. H. B., College Park, 
Md. 

Class of '89— Pindell. R. M.. Philadelphia. 
Pa. | 

Class of '91— Veitch, F. P., College Park, 
Md. 

Class of '92— Besley. F. W.. Baltimore. Md.; 
Casbarian, H. T., College Park. Md.; Morde- 
cai. George P., Baltimore, Md. 

Class of '94 — Bomberger, Franklin B., Col- 
lege Park, Md.; Cairnes. Charles W., Wash- 
ington, D. C; Dent, Howard M.. Brandywine, 
Md. 

Class of '95 — Skinner, W. W., Kensington, 
Md. 

Class of '99— Betton. J. J., Washington, 
D. C; Chambers. J. W., Washington, D. C. 

Class of '00— Groff, Wm. D., Owings Mills. 
Md.; Kefauver, Dr. H. J., Frederick. Md. 

Class of '02 — Symons, T. B., College Park, 
Md. 

Class of '04 — Anderson, J. A., Wilmette. 
111.; Brown, D. E.. Upper Marlboro, Md.; 
Burnside. H. M.. Washington, D. C; Gray. 
J. P., Johnsonburg. Pa.; Merryman, E. W., 
Catonsville, Md.; Mitchell, W. R., Virginia 
Blade. Va.; Mullendore, Thomas B., Buffalo, 
N. Y.; Sasscer, E. R., U.S.D.A.. Washington. 
D. C; Watts. Harry D.. New York. N. Y.; 
Wentworth, George S., Yonkers, N. Y.; Mayo, 
Edmund C Providence, R. I. 

Class of '06 — Graham, J. J. T., Bowie, Md. 

Class of '08 — Brigham, Reuben, Ashton, 
Md.; Byrd, H. C, College Park, Md.; Brough- 
ton. L. B„ College Park, Md.; Hoshall, H. 
B., College Park. Md.; Long, Urah W., Sel- 
byville. Del.; Oswald. E. I.. College Park, 
Md.; Sylvester, Charles. Baltimore, Md.; Sil- 
vester, Richard L... Washington. D. C; Som- 
erville. A. S.. Cumberland, Md.; Warthen. 
C. A., Washington, D. C. 

Class of '09— Cory. Ernest N., College Park, 
Md.; Coster, H. M., Indian Head. Md.; Jarrell. 
T. D., Hyattsville. Md.; Maslin. Wm. R., Port 
Chester, N. Y. 

Class of '10— Cole, W. P.. Jr.. Towson, Md.; 
Maxwell, Frank J., Towson, Md. 

Class of '12— Hillegeist, Willard M.. Balti- 
more, Md.; Kemp, W. B., College Park, Md. 

Class of '14 — Gray, John B.. Jr.. Prince 
Frederick, Md.; Hoffecker, F. S., Sr., Spar- 
rows Point. Md.; Truitt, R. V., College Park, 
Md.; Williams, E. P.. College Park, Md.; 
Shipley. H. B., College Park, Md. 

(Continued on Page 10, Col. 3) 



Maryland Alumni News 



PRESIDENT'S 
MESSAGE 



Fellow Alumni of Maryland: 

I am deeply grateful to you for the 
confidence placed in me by electing me 
your President for 1939-40. While 1 ap- 
preciate the honor and privilege of sen ing 
as vour leader I fully recognize the duties 
and responsibilities of the office. I trust 
that I shall be able to plan wisely, to 
proceed with good judgment and to work 
effectively in the interest of our Associa- 
tion. I have great confidence in our strong 
and capable Alumni Board. With your 
assistance, this year should be a banner 
one. 

The University owes us little, if any- 
thing, but we owe everything to the Uni- 
versity. Many of our Alumni, fully appreci- 
ating that fact, have continued to serve 
their Alma Mater vear in and vcar out since 
graduation. No university in the world 
has a finer group of Alumni, but there is 
not enough genuine interest on the part 
of the Alumni generally. We need the 
Universitv — the University needs us. Let 
us, each and every one. extend our efforts, 
renew our interests, if lost, and actually 
dedicate our lives to the welfare, growth 
and spirit of the Institution. 

The many features of Alumni Day this 
year, including class reunions; the pre- 
liminary dedication of the Rossbourg Inn; 
the Annual Reunion. Dinner and Com 
mencement Ball, demonstrated beyond 
doubt the true spirit of Maryland and its 
traditions. Loyalty supreme, friendship re- 
newed, and true interest were all in evi- 
dence. 

It was all thrilling and satisfying. Did 
you attend? Are vou a member? If not, 
why? No Alumnus of Maryland can have 
a good reason. Help us to build a bigger 
Association. It can be better. Alumni, 
we are depending on vou. Write me and 
give me that assurance of loyalty, interest, 
and support. 

On behalf of the Alumni Board it is my 
great honor and privilege, as your Presi- 
dent, to extend to you most hearty greet- 
ings. We pledge vou our continued in- 
terest, loyalty and genuine desire to work 
for the welfare of our Association and the 
Universitv. In return we solicit and expect 
the loyalty, active support, and interest of 
every Alumnus of the University. 
Most sincerely yours, 

Charles W. Sylvester, 

President. 



Robert M. Pindell Celebrates 
His Fiftieth Anniversary 

AFTER raising his class flag in celebra- 
tion of the Fiftieth Anniversary of his 
class, the Honorable Robert M. Pindell, '89, 
was the principal speaker at the Alumni 
Luncheon. In his remarks, Mr. Pindell 
said: "That fifty years have passed since I 
walked down this winding road is hard to 
believe, and I am struck with this fact: 
Fifty years in antic- 
ipation is a long 
time, but fifty years 
in retrospect is a 
very short time; and 
if you would but 
remember that, I 
think you would get 
a great deal more 
happiness out of 
life than if you take 
the attitude that 
with t h c passing 
years you are just 
so many men and 
women. As I walked 
up from the pike 
this morning along the winding road, I 
was conscious of the fact that when I got 
to the Library steps that the walk was an 
easy walk, and I walked it as I had fifty 
years ago. It took a very short time in ret- 
rospect. 

"President Cole has referred to the fact 
that I was President of the Association in 
the years 1915 to 191". That is a fact. 
And perhaps there are some of you here 
who do not realize that those were quite 
important years in the life and history of 
the old M. A. C, and I am very proud of 
the fact that I was able to be among those 
present at that time. It was during that 
time that they traded ownership in the Old 
(Continued on Page 11, Col. 1) 



THE ANNUAL 
MEETING 




R. M. Pindell, 



Rossbourg Inn 

Needs Antiques 

Anv Alumnus who has, in his or 
her family, anv antique glassware, 
potterv, pewter or furniture which 
was m use prior to 1800 and desires 
to give or loan for use in the Ross- 
bourg Inn, will be gratefully appre- 
ciated. 

Gestures in this way would tend 
to greatlv increase the tradition of 
the Inn as associated with the Alum 
ni. Those who have anything of 
interest, please write the Alumni 
Office. 



The minutes of the previous meeting 
were read and approved. The treasurer's 
report showed a vcarlv income of $3,1 34.72 
with an expenditure of $3,098.29, leaving 
a balance of $36.43. The expenses in- 
cluded the printing of the Alumni Nivvs, 
group organization mailing. Homecoming, 
Alumni Day, and various costs in the Alum 
ni Office. The auditors' report, by Mr. 
Cissel of the College of Commerce, found 
the books to be in order. 

Fund Trustees 

President Cole then gave a resume of 
his tenure of office, touching on the high 
spots of the year — Homecoming, Charter 
Day Celebration, the Rossbourg Inn and 
the appointment of the five trustees for 
the Alumni Fund. His appointments were 
as follows: Dr. F. B. Bomberger, '94, Mr. 
W. D. Groff, '00, Mr. H. D. Watts, '04. 
Mr. A. C. Diggs, '20 and Mr. L. G. Math 
ias, '23. A motion was passed by the As- 
sociation confirming the appointments. 

The secrctarv was asked to present an 
amendment to the Constitution as recom 
mended bv the Alumni Board, providing 
for an increase in personnel of the Board. 
The amendment provided for another vice- 
president, a representative of the College 
of Commerce and two more members at 
large. The amendment reads as follows: 

Amendment to Article IV, Section 2 

"The Alumni Board shall be composed 
as follows: The President, immediate past 
President, First and Second Vice-Presi- 
dents, Secretary-Treasurer of the Alumni 
Association, one graduate from each of the 
Schools of the University, which is pre- 
sided over by a Dean and four members- 
at large, two to be elected from the women 
and two from the men Alumni." 

Amendment to Article VII, Section 3 

"At each annual meeting, there shall be 
elected members of the Alumni Board from 
the Schools of the Universitv-, as provided 
for in Article IV, Section 2. The terms of 
the members of the Alumni Board (except 
the President, First and Second Vice-Pres- 
idents and Secretary-Treasurer) shall be for 
three vears, one-third, or approximately 
one-third, of the members being elected 
each year, except the members at large, 
who shall be elected annually.'' 

Carried June 1, 1939. 
(Continued on Page 11, Col. 1) 



June, 1939 



5 



New Officers Of Alumni Association 




Chichester 



BuRNSIDE 



Chesnut 



Powell 



Wertheimer 



Dr. Arthur Hebb, Heads Medical Alumni; 
Dr. Harry E. Kelsey, Elected President of Dentists; 
Dr. Charles Austin To Lead Pharmacy 



WHEN the Professional Alumni 
Associations held their annual 
meetings during June Week they elected 
new Presidents. For the ensuing year Dr. 
Arthur Hebb, '98. B. M. C. will lead the 
Medical Alumni. Dr. Hebb has been a 
practicing physician in Baltimore City ever 
since his graduation. He is a member of 
the American Medical Association and a 



specialist in proctology. 

The Dental boys chose Dr. Harry E. 
Kelsey, '96, B. C. D. S„ a specialist in 
orthodontia and one who has always had 
an active interest in the Dental School. 
Prior to the merger of the Baltimore Col- 
lege of Dental Surgery, the oldest dental 
school in the world, with the University 
of Maryland, Dr. Kelsey was professor of 



orthodontia. He is also a past President of 
the Maryland State Dental Association. 

In the Pharmacy Association thev have 
elected probably one of the most enthu- 
siastic, loyal and hardest working Alumnus 
in the University, Charles S. Austin, '16. 
He has been on practically every commit- 
tee, a member of the Board of Directors, 
and Vice President. If any one knows how 
to keep the Alumni active, Charles Austin 
should. 

The News takes this occasion to congrat- 
ulate the newly elected Presidents and wish 
for each a most successful tenure of office 



Haines, 96, Entertains Faculty And Alumni 



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On a week-end last month, Mahlon N. Haines, '96, of York, Pa., 
entertained some twenty faculty members and Alumni from College 
Park. 

Haines is the "Shoe Wizard" and, in addition to his business, has 
quite an interesting array of hobbies. Probably the most outstanding 
are his 18 to 20 trotting horses which have won several hundred blue 
ribbons. His saddle horses have captured many a horse show through- 
out the Eastern States. 

Then you go out to his "Wizard Ranch" where is located a 
collection of curios for many years and from many foreign coun- 
tries. Most of these are his own collection. At the ranch he has a 
team of oxen, several burros and many prize chickens of rare breeds. 
Also ducks, peacocks, pheasants and monkeys. 

From the ranch he led the party to his hotel on the banks of 
the Susquehanna, for a fried chicken and waffle dinner. 

Haines has a beautiful home located on the outskirts of York 
called "Haines Acres." 

Those making the trip were Dr. and Mrs. W. W. Skinner. '95, 
Dr. H. C. Bvrd. '08. Dr. T. II. Taliaferro, Dr. and Mrs. L. B. 
Broughton, '08, Dr. \V. T. L. Taliaferro, Dr. and Mrs. F. II. Bom 
berger, '94, Mr. and Mrs. Parker Mitchell, '96, of Pcrryville, Md., 
Mr. and Mrs. Harlan Randall, Miss Francis Idc, and Mr. and Mrs. 
G. F. Pollock, '23. 



Maryland Alumni News 



Gov. O'Conor Among Alumni 

Who Receive Honorary Degrees 



Among those to receive honorary tie 
grees at the one hundred and thirty-second 
Commencement Exercises were three dis- 
tinguished Alumni. His Excellency Her- 
bert R. O'Conor, Governor of Maryland, 
;i graduate of the Law School in 1920, 
received the degree of Doctor of Laws. 
Another was the Honorable Mclvin C. 
Ha/en. chairman of the District of Co- 
lumbia Commissioners, first President of 
our Alumni Association, and a graduate 
in the class of 1888. He also received the 
degree of Doctor of Laws. 

From the mid-West came Dr. Fred 



Wharton Rankin, noted surgeon and out 
standing graduate of the School of Med 
icine in the class of '09, who received 
the degree of Doctor of Science. 

Glenn Martin Also Honored 
Other men outstanding in their field to 
receive honorary degrees were the Hon- 
orable Glenn F. Martin, president of the 
Martin Aeroplane Company of Baltimore, 
who received the degree of Doctor of En- 
gineering. The Honorable Cecil Willis 
Creel, director of extension at the Uni- 
versity of Nevada, received the degree of 
Doctor of Agriculture. 



Alumni Dinner A Success; 

Sen. fydings And Munro Leaf Speak 



The innovation of having the Alumni 
Dinner on Friday night met with consid- 
erable success. A very attractive and enter 
raining program pleased the returning old 
grads and many faculty members. 

Senator Millard L. Tydings, "111. who 
was a principal speaker along with Munro 
Leaf, '27, author of Ferdinand, gave the 
old grads some of his good, sound thoughts. 
"Many things make a great University," 
said Senator Tydings. "First is a good stu- 
dent body, second is a good faculty and 
third, an up-and coming and spirited 
Alumni Association. And although you 
might have a good student body, good 
teachers and a good Alumni Association, 
somehow it might not click — it might not 
be the fine success that such material 
should make it. There is a deeper thing, 
it seems to me, that makes a school good 
and that thing is, for want of a better 
word, 'spirit.' If 'spirit' is in any way di- 
minishing, then it is more important to 
build than any dormitories or laboratories. 

"For somehow or other it does not 
seem to me that the Alumni are attached 
closelv enough to the school to which 
they owe so much. I do not know how 
that can be increased." 

Come Back Often 

"Alumni should go back, not once but 
two or three times a year and familiarize 
themselves with the progress and develop 
ment that is taking place. We should sup- 
port the President, the faculty and the 



Board of Regents in every way we can 
where sound measures are before the Leg 
'slature. When we have a real need we 
ought to unite and lend our support to 
die fight. We will be building monuments 
to ourselves while we are living which is 
a rare thing to do. This University will be 
a monument to every Alumnus. It is the 
greatest thing we can do for the State 
University and for our future generation." 
Munro Leaf told what inspired him to 
write Ferdinand the Bull. This he did in 
an interesting and humorous way. 

Cole Toastmaster 

Mr. C. Walter Cole. '21, past Presi- 
dent of the Association, who was toast- 
master, called on Dr. H. C. Bvrd, '08, for 
a word of greeting to the Alumni. Dr. 
Bvrd responded in his usual enthusiastic 
and attractive way. 

At the dinner one of our outstanding 
faculty members was appropriately hon- 
ored for his many years of devoted and 
loyal service to our Alma Mater — Profes- 
sor Charles S. Richardson, retiring head of 
the Public Speaking Department. Profes- 
sor Richardson has served the University 
in many capacities for a forty year period 
and in recognition of his services, our il- 
lustrious Alumnus, the Honorable William 
P. Cole, Jr., TO, made the presentation 
of a gift on behalf of the University. Even 
the veteran in public speaking was so 
deeply touched that his words failed him 
in response of grateful appreciation. 
(Continued on Page 11, Co/. 2) 




Top — Governor O'Conor Receives Hood 

for LL. D. 

Middle — Mr. Hazen Receiving Degree. 

Bottom — Evelyn Bvrd Receives Diploma 

from President Bvrd, her father. 

Dedicatory Exercises 
At Rossbourg Inn 

One of the outstanding events on the 
Alumni Day Program was the Dedicatory 
Exercises of the traditions of the Ross- 
bourg Inn as associated with the Alumni. 
The Inn was open for inspection and 
many Alumni and friends visited the his 
toric structure, now in progress of renova 
tion. A visitor's book was on hand and 
the first to register was the Honorable 
Robert M. Pindell, '89, past President of 
the Alumni and the only returning mem- 
ber of the fifty-year class. 

Under the auspices of the Alumni As 
( Continued on Page 11, Col. 3) 



June, 1939 



Old Line Athletic Contributions 



By W. H. ("Bill") HOTTEL: 



64 Athletes And 5 Managers 

Awarded Letters In Spring Sports 



Sixty-four Maryland athletes and five 
managers in as many sports received let- 
ters at an Assembly on the campus on 
May 31, the awards being made in base- 
ball, lacrosse, track, tennis and rifle. 

Onlv baseball will be hard hit bv grad- 
uation, the nine losing six men, includ- 
ing Eddie Johnson, George Knepley, and 
Shortv Chumbris, three regular infielders. 

Jim Meade and Rip Hewitt, two great 
lacrosse players, will be lost, as will Eddie 
Miller, high jumper, and Hermie Evans. 
hurdler, the best men Maryland ever has 
had in these events. 

All of the tennis players will return and 
only three will be lost from an outstand- 
ing rifle team. 

Those to receive the awards were: 

Baseball — *Joe Crisafulli, 'Angelo 
Chumbris and *Cleom Chumbris, Wash- 
ington, D. C; Adam Bengoechea, Chevy 
Chase, Md.; *Charhe Weidinger and 
Erank Dwyer, Baltimore; Earl Springer, 
Hagerstown, Md.; Pershing Mondorff, 
Emmitsburg, Md.; *George Knepley, Al- 
toona, Pa.; Fritz Maisel, Catonsville, Md.; 
*Eddie Johnson, Germantown, Md.; Rob- 
ert Burns, Havre de Grace, Md.; Hugh 
Keller, Middletown, Md.; Burton Culver, 
Hyattsville, Md.; '"Manager George Seeley, 
Baltimore. 

Lost — Crisafulli, A. Chumbris, C. 
Chumbris, Weidinger, Knepley, and John- 
son. 



Lacrosse — *John Badenhoop, William 
Bond, Charles Allen, * Frederic Hewitt, 
James Heil, Oscar Nevares, Gary Todd, 
Leo Mueller, John Mueller, Jordan Sex- 
ton, *John Muncks and *Manager Rich- 
ard O'Neill, Baltimore; *Jim Meade, Port 
Deposit, Md.; William Cole and John 
Grier, Towson, Md.; Jim Forrester, Ber- 
wyn, Md.; George Lawrence, Hanover, 
Pa.; Milton Mulitz, Washington, D. C. 

Lost — Hewitt, Meade, Muncks and 
Badenhoop. 



Kluge, Washington, D. C; Mason Chron- 
ister and * William Howard, Baltimore; 
Joe Devlin, Catonsville, Md.; Jim Kehoe, 
Bel Air, Md.; Charles Morris, Delmar, 
Md.; Joe Murphy, Carney's Point, N. J.; 
Vernon Miller, Laurel, Md.; Gene Ochsen- 
reiter, Rockville, Md.; *Manager Samuel 
LeFrak, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Lost — Evans, E. Miller, Peaslee and 
Howard. 



Tennis — Nathan Askin, Jack Phillips 
and Phil Burkom, Baltimore; Albert Ritz- 
enberg, Lawrence Lichliter, James Burn- 
side and James Hardv, Washington, D. C, 
and Manager Joseph Morris, Port Deposit, 
Md. 



Rifle — * Warren Davis, George Meeks, 
Willard Jensen, * Floyd Soule, Enos Ray, 
Raymond Hodges, Jack C. Marzolf and 
Joseph M. Marzolf, Washington, D. C; 
Thomas Riley, Germantown, Md.; F. Dean 
Evans, Chevy Chase, Md.; A. E. Imus, 
Mount Rainier, Md.; Robert Laughhead, 
Bethesda, Md.; *Manager Richard Kern, 
Braddock Heights, Md. 

Lost — Evans, Soule and Davis. 



Track — *Halbert Evans and Tom 
Fields, Hyattsville, Md.; * Edwin Miller. 
*Joe Peaslee, Alan Miller and Gordon 



* Gold awards for those who were on 
Varsity squads for three years and won the 
"M" at least once. 



KELLER BEST BATTER 

Hugh Keller, brother of Charlie Keller, 
who is making a name for himself with 
the New York Yankees, led the Maryland 
nine in batting during the past season 
with an average of .468. He hit in all of 
the 19 games, except the first, getting an 
average of 2 hits a game, 
o 
PITCHERS STAGE DUEL 

Lefty Earl Springer of Hagerstown and 
Pershing Mondorff of Emmitsburg, staged 
a hot duel for slab honors on the Terp 
nine. Each lost his first game, then Spring- 
er won 7 straight and Mondorff took 6 in 
a row. Both will be seniors next year and 
big league scouts are looking them over. 



Pair Of Terp Stickmen 
Are All-America 

Jim Meade, at second defense, and Mil- 
ton Mulitz, at cover point, were named 
to the all-America team by the Commit- 
tee of the United States Intercollegiate 
Lacrosse Association, headed by Laurie 
Cox of Syracuse. 

Fred Hewitt, at first attack, was placed 
on the third team, while Jack Grier, goal- 
ie, was given honorable mention. It was 
expected that Hewitt would at least make 
the second team. 

Meade, Mulitz and Hewitt previouslv 
had been chosen on the all-Maryland first 
team by Craig Taylor of the Baltimore 
Sun. 

Meade was rated the best midfielder of 
the year and Mulitz was termed the sec- 
ond best close-in defense player in the all- 
America selections. 

o 

Johnson, Meade Named 
For Highest Honors 

Eddie Johnson, who received the Sil- 
vester gold watch, given by the class of 
1908 for typifying the best in athletics, 
and Jim Meade, who got the Linhardt 
ring as the best Maryland athlete, gained 
the highest awards for the year in Terp 
sports. 

Johnson was outstanding in basketball 
and baseball, while Meade was brilliant in 
football and lacrosse. Each was on his re- 
spective teams for three seasons. Both will 
be sorely missed. 

George Knepley got the Berger award 
as being the most valuable baseball player 
of the year. 

Incidentally, it was an athlete, Joe Peas- 
lee, a trackman, who got the citizenship 
award as the one who has done the most 
for the advancement of the University 
during his four years as a student. 

• 

TRACKMEN BOOST LAURELS 

Maryland's track team added to its 
laurels at the close of the college season 
by easily winning the District A. A. U. 
meet, held in Byrd Stadium, although 
not having its full strength in the games. 
The Terps scored 57 points and took 
about half the 14 individual titles. 



Maryland Alumni News 



Winners, Honor Award 




Top — Peaslee Receiving Citizenship Award. ^ _ 

Be/ou — Meade Receiving Linhardt Ring. Congressman Cole n , " r , 

Presenting. * B Below - Lyd 

Basketball 15 9 

Maryland Has Great Lacrosse 2 

yi £ Baseball 15 4 

ear In Sports Tennis 7 3 o 

Enjoying outstanding success in its spring T t- Is 54 7 5 4 

program of baseball, lacrosse, track and 

. » , , , , , , ., , This is an average of better than 68 per 

tennis, Maryland had one of the best . , r 

. . .. ,. . ,. ., ,„, n cent, victories for the year, 

sports years in its history during the 1938- J 

, n , ' Included in the feats were the winning 

39 term. 6 

T,--., ., , . „. ., of the Southern Conference boxing crown, 

\\ ith the track team setting the pace b 

• ., - • , .. . , , , .j the runner-up position in the loop basket- 

with 5 wins and a tie in 6 dual meets, the r v v 

• „„,. t ->a l a-> ball tourney, second in indoor track and 

spring sports teams captured 34 of 43 " 

, ,„ . ■ ,,■■■ . ., , „ , ., third in the outdoor meet. Maryland took 

events in addition to the deadlock on the >..,..,, 

• > , ■ , ., t>. , ., 6 individual indoor track titles in 12 
cinders, which was with Dartmouth. 

t , _. . c ,, f ..na events and gained 4 in the outdoor com- 

ln tact, except for the football team, b 

there was no Terp aggregation of the year " 

that did not finish well on the right side Maryland's tennis duo of Allie Ritzen- 

of the ledger. Here is the complete rec- ber § and Nathan Askin won the Confer- 

ords of the seven Varsity teams: ence cloilblt -' s title and the Terp lacrosse 

Sport W. L Tied team ' U1S tne best claim to the national 

Football 2 collegiate championship. Maryland and 

Boxing 3 3 Navy are the only leading stick teams that 



Johnson Receiving Silvester Award. 

ia Evans Receiving Mortar Board Award. 

lost only one collegiate game and the 
Terps beat the Middies. They also routed 
Mount Washington Club, 11 to 1, which 
later beat Navy, 8 to 7. 

Joe Murphy, who won the 100 in :09.8 
and the 220 in 21.4 in the outdoor meet, 
tied two University records, the latter set 
in 1926 by Henry (Gump) Matthews. 
Hermie Evans smashed a Maryland record 
with his 23.8 for the 220-yard low hurdles. 

While the Varsity teams were compil- 
ing such a fine record the freshman out- 
fits were keeping pace, taking 34 out of 44 
tests in 7 pastimes, as follows: 



Sport 


W. 


L. 


Football 


. . 3 


-i 


Basketball 


13 


3 


Boxing 





-> 


Lacrosse 


5 


l) 


Tennis 


j 


It 


Track . . 


4 


1 


Baseball 




2 


Totals 


34 


10 



Grapevine News About Those We Know 



Married — Sam Berman and Miss Ida 

Gultinas were married May 7, 1939. Mrs. 

Berman is a grad of Goucher and Sam 

is a member of the Old Liner Class of '37. 



Music — Mrs. Slaby, formerly Miss Lai 
lian Drake, '35, of the Old Line Rifle- 
team, is secretary for Mrs. Dorscv, di- 
rector of the Metropolitan Opera pro- 
gram, in Washington, D. C. Mr. Slaby is 
a member of the Remington-Rand firm in 
Washington and knows Ray Schmidt, '33, 
and Ham Fook, '35, also members of the 
firm. Lillian "savs" they frequently have a 
real Maryland get-together. 
O 

Bank — In the Riggs National Bank in 
Washington you will find Thomas Cor- 
win, '3 5, who is a member of Sigma Phi 
Sigma and a former major in the R. O. 
T. C. Tom recently came to the campus 
looking for applicants who wished to en- 
ter the banking field. This is the way to 
help fellow Alumni. 
O 

Wedding — On Saturday, June 1", at the 
Howard Chapel Church near Long Corner, 
Md., Miss Laura Burdette, '38, and Mr. 
William Browning were married. The hon- 
eymoon was spent in West Virginia, and 
they are now residing in College Park. 

Laura is a graduate in Home Econom- 
ics. Mr. Browning is a former Marine, and 
now is employed at U. S. Soldiers' Home, 
o 

Poets — Nancy Allen Finch, who is now 
attending the University of Maryland, and 
Dorothy Grey Smith, who received her 
degrees of B.A. and M.A. from the U. of 
Md. in 1936 and 1938, arc represented 
in the major anthologies which Henry 
I larrison, New York poetrv publisher, is 
issuing this summer. These books are Eros, 
Sonnets, Music Unheard, and The North 
America Book ot Verse. 
o 

Married — An error was made by the 
News in a previous announcement about 
a wedding. There are two Margaret Eliza- 
beth Jones; one is Marguerite and the 
other is Margaret. Now the marriage of 
Marguerite E. Jones, '37, was to Robert 
Camp, '37. The other Margaret (Peg) E. 
Jones, '35, a member of K. D., married 
William E. Siddall, '31, a member of K. 
A. Mr. and Mrs. Siddall will reside at 4320 
Belview Avenue, Baltimore. 



Europe — Everett Rufus Jones, '34. a 
former Old Line trackster, is touring Eu- 
rope this summer as the official photogra 
pher for the International Methodist Youth 
Conference in Amsterdam. When in 
America, he operates his father's plumb- 
ing business. 



Teaching — Mrs. Curry Noursc Caples, 
'30, a member of Kappa Kappa Gamma, 
now is teaching Home Ec at Poolcsville 
High School, Maryland. She is going to 
Columbia Summer School to study for 
her Master's degree. With her this sum- 
mer will be Maxinc White, '37, also teach- 
ing, but at Damascus High School. 

O 

Birth— William II. Dunbar, an A. T. 
O. of the class of '33, is the proud parent 
of a new prospect for his old Alma Mater. 
Mary Elizabeth, born Friday, May 13th, 
1938, is the granddaughter of Mr. E. B. 
Dunbar, class of '03, and a niece of Ruth 
Dunbar, class of '42. \ Irs. William Dunbar 
was the former Alice Morgan Tilden of 
Frankhnvillc, N. Y., and a graduate of 
Oberlin. The Dunbars arc now residing 
in Little Valley, N. Y., where Bill is en- 
gaged in the feed and grain business. 
O 

Principals — At Oxon Hill High, Thom- 
as S. Gwynn, Jr., '34. is the principal. 
Over at Upper Marlboro, Mr. Can is Shu- 

gart, '29, is the principal. 

O 

Engaged — Andy Bcvcridge is engaged 
to Miss Betty Griffith, daughter of Dr. W. 
Allen Griffith, '09, M.D., of Berwyn, Mel. 
Andy is in the Patent Department of the 
General Electric Company in Washington 
and attending George Washington Law 
School. 

O 

Receives Norfolk Call — The Rev. Rob- 
ert W. Sonen, '34, of Washington, D. C, 
was recently extended a call to the pastor- 
ate of the Unitarian Church of Norfolk, 
Virginia. 

Sonen is a student at the Mcadville The- 
ological School at Chicago. He was a mem- 
ber of Phi Sigma Kappa social fraternity 
and Scabbard and Blade, honorary mili- 
tary fraternity. He was also a member of 
the Varsity track team for three years. He 
later took graduate work at George Wash- 
ington University before going to Chicago. 



Alumni Day Attracts 
Many Old Grads 

( Continued from Page 4, Col. 3 ) 

Class of '16— Bopst, L. E.. College Park, Md. 

Class of '18— Cotterman. H. F.. College 
Park. Md.; Eppley. Geary. College Park. Md.; 
Walls. H. R., College Park. Md. 

Class of '19 — Bolgiano, J. Walton. Cockeys- 
ville. Md.; Brown, M. C. Baltimore, Md.; 
Coster, Howard O., Washington, D. C; Bletch, 
Chester F.. Washington, D. C; Hardisty. 
Walter R., Lanham, Md.; Lewis, Ransom R., 
Jr.. Frederick. Md.; McLean, David L., Bal- 
timore, Md.; Paine. Charles E., Washington. 
D. C; Seaman. R. Lee, College Park. Md.; 
Stevens. James E.. Baltimore. Md.; Wallop, 
J. Douglas, Jr., Washington, D. C. 

Class of '20— Chichester, Peter W.. Fred- 
erick. Md.: Clendaniel. George W.. Denton. 
Md.; Ruppert. C. Edward. Washington, D. C. 

Class of '21— Bland. Billie. Sparks, Md.; 
Cole. C. Walter. Towson. Md.; Diggs. Austin 
C. Towson. Md ; Slanker, Frederick K... 
Washington. D. C. 

Class of '22— Browne. E. L.. North Arling- 
ton, Va.; Davis, Malcolm, Washington, D. C; 
Filbert. Edwin B.. Baltimore. Md.; Jones, 
Mrs. Mildred S.. Washington, D. C; Kirby, 
Wm. W., Rockville, Md. 

Class of '23 — Barnes. Benjamin L., Princess 
Anne. Md.; Besley. Kirk, Hyattsville. Md.; 
Davis, Malcolm Mrs., Washington, D. C; 
Mathias, L. G., Hagerstown. Md.; McBride, 
Austin A., Huntingdon, Pa.; Preinkert, Alma 
H., Washington, D. C; White. Charles E., 
College Park, Md.; Pollock, G. F., College 
Park. Md. 

Class of '24 — Cohee. Lee A., College Park. 
Md.; Darcy. George D.. College Park, Md.; 
Filbert, Portia M.. Baltimore, Md.; Lankford, 
J. Miles, Pocomoke City. Md.; Luckey. 
George J„ Washington. D. C; Miller, R. H.. 
Jr.. Spencerville. Md.; Morris. Sarah E.. New 
York. N. Y.; Prince. Charles E., Jr.. Calvert 
Hills, Md.; Rothgeb. R. G.. Takoma Park. 
Md.: Stamp. Adele. College Park. Md. 

Class of '25— Eppley. Elizabeth Flenner, 
College Park. Md.; Hale. Grace C, Bloom- 
field, N. J.; Rolland. Arthur H . Elkview, 
West Va.: Schrader, A. L.. College Park. Md.; 
Worthington. Leland G., Berwyn, Md.; Zale- 
sak, E. F., College Park. Md. 

Class of '26— Fogg, George W., College 
Park, Md.; McBride. Olive W.. Huntingdon. 
Pa.; Supplee. W. C, Laurel. Md. 

Class of '27— Munro Leaf. New York City. 

Class of "28— Thomas. Lewis W., Jr., Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Class of '29— Boyer, Roswell R.. Washing- 
ton, D C: Burhoe. Alice P.. Mrs.. Takoma 
Park. Md.; Cockerill. Wm. H.. Purcellville. 
Va.; Epstein, Herman. Baltimore. Md.; Fried- 
enwald. Aaron. Baltimore. Md.; Hamilton. 

A. B.. University Park. Md.; Koons, C. V.. 
Washington. D. C; McNeil, W. Gelston, Bal- 
timore. Md.; Plumley. Rev. Walter P., Had- 
don Heights. N. J.; Snouffer, E. Nelson, Col- 
lege Park, Md.: Stabler. Stanley P., Spencer- 
ville, Md.; Wertheimer, Philip. Frederick. 
Md. 

Class of '30— Cobey. W. W., College Park, 
Md.; Kieffer, J. Donald, New York City; 
Madigan. George F., Laurel, Md.; Simmons. 

B. S., Chevy Chase, Md. 

Class of '31— Bewley, John P.. Berwyn. 
Veitch, Dr. F. P.. Jr.. College Park, Md.; 
Cissel, C. Wilbur. College Park. Md. 

Class of '33— Burdette, Roger F., College 
Park, Md.; Woods. Albert W., College Park, 
Md. 

Class of '34— Baldwin, Dick. Baltimore 
Md.; Gwynn. Thomas S.. Jr.. Clinton. Md 
Mansfield. William F., Washington. D. C 
Reinhol, Louise, Hyattsville, Md.; Sclar. Ja- 
cob B., Silver Spring, Md.; Sothoron. Nor- 
wood S., Washington, D. C. 

Class of '35— McCaw. F. Stewart, Edmon- 
ston. Md.; Poffenberger. Paul R.. College 
Park. Md.; Rittenhouse, Charles K.. Balti- 
more, Md.; Silkman, John A., Baltimore, 
Md. 

Class of '36— Quigley, George D.. Laurel. 
Md.; Sachs. George H.. Washington. D. C. 

Class of '37 — Snyder. Ruth, University 
Park, Md.; Somerville. Ruth E.. Cumber- 
land. Md.; Williams, Margaret, Silver Spring, 
Md. 

Class of '38 — Horman. Austin S.. Balti- 
more. Md.; Long, Edwin D., Jr., Westover. 
Md. 



10 



Maryland Alxnnni News 



The Annual Meeting 



(Continued from Page 5, Col. 3) 
Following the adoption of the amend 
ment by the Association, the chairman of 
the Nominating Committee was asked for 
a report. Mr. Reuben Brigham, '08, chair- 
man of the Committee, presented the fol 
lowing nominations: 

For President — Charles W. Sylvester, '08 
For First Vice-President— Peter W. Chi 

Chester. '2(1 
For Second Vice-President — Harold W. 

Burnside, '04 
For Representative of Arts and Sciences — 

J. Donald Kieffer, '30 
For Representative of Education — R. Ran- 
som Lewis, '19 
For Representative of College of Com 

mercc — Norwood Sothoron, '34 
For Representatives-at-Large : 

Women — Mrs. Mary York Gaddj '28 

Miss Gertrude Chcsnut. '26 
Men — Phillip Wertheimer, '20 

Edward E. Powell, '13. 
A motion made and passed that the 
presentation of the Nomination Commit- 
tee be unanimously elected. The secretary 
was requested to cast the ballot. 

President Cole then asked Mr. Chiches- 
ter and Mr. Lewis to escort President Svl- 



Alumni Dinner 
A Success 

(Continued from Page 7, Col. 2) 
Entertainment for the dinner was pro 
vided by Miss Louise Baer, an opera star 
from New York, and Mr. A. B. Pearcc of 
the Gridiron Club of Washington. 

Following the dinner all were invited to 
attend the Commencement Ball in the 
University Gymnasium as guests of the 
University, which concluded the forty- 
seventh annual Alumni Reunion. 



Whiteford, '01, Sends Greetings 

A telegram was received from past 
President Henry C. Whiteford, '01, ex- 
pressing his regret for his inability to be 
present. 

The telegram, read by President C. 
Walter Cole, said: "Sorry it will be im- 
possible for me to have the pleasure of 
being with my fellow Alumni today. Please 
convey my best regards to all the boys. 
Signed, Henry C. Whiteford, '01." 

vester to the chair to receive the gavel as 
President for the ensuing year. After a few- 
remarks, and no further business. President 
Sylvester asked for a motion of adjourn- 
ment. 



Celebrates 50th Anniversary 

Maryland Agricultural College with the 
consent of the stockholders by the present 
form of charter, and I hope I may be per- 
mitted to take sonic little credit for having 
been active along that line — the change 
is marvelous and almost unbelievable and 
I must offer my congratulations to Presi- 
dent Byrd and the members of the Faculty 
and the Alumni Association for accom- 
plishing it. I am very, very glad I came 
here todav and I am coming again," con- 
cluded Mr. Pindcll. 

President Cole called on President Bvrd 



for a few remarks. He also introduced each 
of the past Presidents of the Alumni As- 
sociation present: 

I)r. F. B. Bombergcr. '94 

Dr. Fletcher P. Veith, '95 

Dr. T. B. Svmons, '02 

Mr. W. D. Groff, '00 

Mr. E. F. Zalesak, '25. 

Those classes holding special reunions 
were requested to stand, and the class of 
'04 had eight out of ten present, reported 
W. R. Mitchell, president of the class. 

Following the luncheon the class re- 
unions were held at various spots on the 
campus. 



Plaque Presented 

(Continued from Page 7, Col. 3) 
sociation, special dedicatory exercises were 
held at the Inn at which time a bronze 
tablet was unveiled to commemorate the 
traditions of the Inn as exemplified in its 
Alumni. 

Cole Presents Plaque 
Dr. 1''. B. Bombergcr, '94, past Presi- 
dent of the Alumni Association, presided 
in the absence of the Honorable Mclvin 
C. Ha/en, '88, first President of the As- 
sociation. Remarks were made by Dr. II. 
J. Patterson, former director of the Uni- 
versity Experiment Station, and one who 
occupied this building as an office for more 
than fiftv years. President C. Walter Cole, 
'21, of the Association, made the presen- 
tation of the plaque on behalf of the 
Alumni Association, and Dr. W. W. Skin- 
ner. '95, chairman of the Board of Re- 
gents, accepted on behalf of the Univer- 
sity. The plaque was unveiled by Miss 
Fredericka Waldman, '39, and Miss Lor- 
raine Jackson, '40, who were dressed in 
Colonial costumes. 

Dr. II. C. Byrd, 'OS, made the conclud- 
ing remarks about the historical tracli 
tions of the building and how it is planned 
to perpetuate these traditions. 

The inscription on the plaque is as fol- 
lows : 

THE ROSSBOURG INN 
Erected in 1798, in the infancy of 
the nation and a few years before the 
founding of the University of Mary 
land, the Rossbourg Inn stands as one 
of the landmarks of the nation's and 
the University's growth. 'Phis historic 
structure has been restored by the 
Univcrsitv of Maryland with the aid 
of the Federal Government and is ded- 
icated to the spirit of loyalty and the 
the traditions of democracy as ex- 
emplified in its Alumni and students. 



Placed June 2, 1939, with appro- 
priate exercises by the Alumni As- 
sociation of the University of Mary- 
land. 



CUT ON THIS LINE 



THE NEW YEAR DRIVE IS ON 

A/^ ill You Join Your Fellow Alumni? 



Fellow Alumni: 

wish to be a contributing member of 
ic University of Maryland Alumni As. 
)ciation, and am enclosing the usual 
fount of $2.00 for the year 1939-1940, 
f this fifty cents is for one year's sub- 
notion to the Alumni News. 



r PLEASE FILL OUT AND RETURN THIS BLANK NOW ! ! 



Name Class ..... Occupation 

Address 

Married? To whom Children 
Business address Title 



Si 

p 

:. 



5 

a. 

« • 



3 
« 
I: 




J he Chesterfield glove, created by New York's 
smart designer Merry Hull. . . 

Original and different too is chesterfield's 

way of combining the world's best tobaccos to bring 
out the finer qualities of each. It's the Chesterfield way 
and that's why Chesterfields are milder than other 
cigarettes. They also have a better taste and more 
pleasing aroma. Chesterfields really satisfy. 




070*" 

HAND- 



AND-GLOVE WITH 
SMOKING PLEASURE 







ALUMNI 
NEWS 



JULY 
1939 






u 

ha 



o 
o 




Our Military Staff 




Second Row 
First Row — 



— Sergeant Wood, Sergeant Uhrinak, Sergeant Norris. 

Captain Maglin, Major Hervey, Lieutenant-Colonel Patch, 
Major Jones, Major Wastfall. 



R. O. T. C. 



jti 



ream mi- 



Recipient of the highest War Depart- 
ment rating since the year 1926, the Uni- 
versity of Maryland is justly proud of its 
record and especially desirous of maintain- 
ing its high standard. 

To the capable army officers stationed 
at the University goes a great deal of 
credit, for their policy of developing cam- 
pus leaders as cadet officers and permitting 
them to use individual initiative has borne 
fruit. "It is a conceded fact," says Col. 
}. D. Patch, head of the Maryland con- 
tingent, "that our officers compile the 
finest records at summer training camp, 
both from point of conduct and leader- 
ship." 

Attesting to the capacities 
of the army and cadet officers 
and also to the fine spirit of a 
cooperative regiment during 
the 1938-39 school year are 
Col. Frank T. Kellond, officer 
in charge of R. O. T. C. af- 
fairs for The Third Corps 
Area, whose stamp of approv- 
al leaves the way clear for a 
War Department inspection, 
and Genl. F. T. Hines, di- 
rector of the Veterans' Ad- 



D. C, both of whom we 
pressed bv regimental reviews. 

At a similar review the regiment hon- 
ored Warrant Officer William McManus 
who, after twenty years at the University, 
was transferred to Third Corps Area head- 
quarters at Baltimore. It was fitting that a 
gold watch be presented at this time to 
the man who, says Colonel Patch, "has 
done more for the Military Department 
than any other man." 

With the passing of Military Day on 
May 9th, with its competitions and final 
inspection, this year by Genl. Frank Park- 
er, commander of the famous First Divi- 
sion, the regiment may look back with sat- 
isfaction, yet forward with anticipation 
for greater years to come. 




ministration at Washington, 



Sergeant McManus Saying Goodbye 



Lieut.-Colonel J. D. Patch 

(From the 1939 Terrapin) 
Few men in the brief span of four years 
have exerted as lasting an influence upon 
the students of the University of Mary- 
land as the present professor of Military 
Science and Tactics. By his words, actions, 
and manner, he has won the respect and 
admiration of all with whom he has come 
in contact. A gentleman at all times, he 
has shown himself a man worthy not only 
of his calling but also of the confidence of 
the student body. In recognition of the 
many services he has rendered the Univer- 
sity and the inspiring example he has set 
for all, the editors dedicate this volume 
of the Terrapin to Lieut. -Col. Joseph D. 

Patch, Commandant of Cadets. 
o 

Three Officers Leave 

Lieutenant-Colonel Patch, Major Her- 
vcv and Captain Maglin have been trans- 
ferred to other military posts this sum- 
mer. 

All have rendered invaluable services to 
the University in many capacities other 
than military during their tenure of serv- 
ice. Thev have won the admiration of the 
entire University and The News takes this 
occasion to wish for each an abundance of 
success in all future endeavors. 



Volume XI 



MARYLAND ALUMNI NEWS, JULY, 1939 



Number 2 



Alumni Association — University of Maryland 

Founded in 1892 



OFFICERS FOR 195') -40 

Charles W. Sylvester, '08, President 
Baltimore, Md. 

P. W. Chichester, '20, First Vice-President Frederick, Md. 

H. W. Burnside, '04, Second Vice-President Washington, D. C. 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Secretary-Treasurer College Park, Md. 

ALUMNI BOARD 
(Note — The officers named above are also members of the Alumni Board) 

J. Donald Kieffer, '30 Arts and Sciences 

Charles V. Koons, '29 Engineering 

R. R. Lewis, '19 Education 

John A. Silkman, '35 Agriculture 

Ruth Miles, '31 Home Economics 

Norwood Sothoron, '34 Commerce 

MEMBERS AT LARGE 

E. E. Powell, '13; Philip Wertheimer, '29 Men's Representatives 

Mary York Gadd, '28; Gertrude Chesnut, '26 Women's Representatives 

C. Walter Cole, '21 Immediate Past President 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Editor 

Maryland Alumni News, issued monthly by the University of Maryland Alumni Associa- 
tion at College Park, Md., as second-class matter under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Annual Alumni Association dues are $2.00. One year's subscription to Alumni News, 
50 cents. 

GROUP LEADERS 

ALLEGANY COUNTY: E. Brooke Whitting, '98, President; Dr. Joseph Franklin. '21. Secretary. 
Cumberland, Md. 

BALTIMORE COUNTY: C. Walter Cole, '21, President; H. B. Derrick, '17. Secretary, Towson, 
Maryland. 

BALTIMORE CITY: Chester Tawney. '31. President, 4022 Roland Avenue; E. Gordon Ham- 
mond, '34. Secretary, 1023 W. Barre Street. Baltimore. Md. 

CAROLINE COUNTY: George W. Clendaniel. '20. President; Dr. Maurice A. Brackett, '21, 
Treasurer; Mrs. George W. Clendaniel. '21, Secretary, all of Denton, Md. 

HARFORD COUNTY: W. B. Munnikhuysen, '14, President; H. M. Carroll, '20, Secretary, 
Bel Air, Md. 

FREDERICK COUNTY: J. Homer Remsberg, '18, President; Henry R. Shoemaker. '17, Sec- 
retary, Frederick. Md. 

MONTGOMERY COUNTY: Lawrence G. Smoot, '18. President. Kensington. Md.; Mary Fisher. 
'36. Secretary, Rockville, Md. 

NEW YORK CITY: Donald Kieffer. '30. President, 195 Broadway; Sarah Morris, '25. Secretary. 
310 East 44th Street. New York City. 

PHILADELPHIA: A. Moulton McNutt. '06. President. 413 Cooper Street, Camden, N. J.; J. P. 
Mudd. '07, Secretary, 174 Manheim Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

PITTSBURGH: E. Minor Wenner, '27. President. 1111 Gladys Avenue; Dr. A. A. Krieger, '32, 
Secretary Highland Building, Pittsburgh. Pa. 

WASHINGTON, D. C: J. Douglas Wallop. '19. President. 6139 N. Dakota Avenue, N.W.; 
Charles V. Koons. '29. Secretary, 419 Fourth Street. N.E., Washington. 

WASHINGTON COUNTY: Hon. Henry Holzapfel. Jr., '93. President, Hagerstown, Md.; L. G. 
Mafhias, '23, Secretary, Hagerstown, Md. 

"M" CLUB OFFICERS AND BOARD MEMBERS 

Donald H. Adams, '28 President Dr. E. N. Cory, '09 Secretary-Treat. 

A. K. Beslf.y, '23 Vice-President W. R. Maslin, '09 Historian 



G. F. Pollock, '23 Baseball 

H. B. Shipley, '14 Basketball 

Stewart McCaw, '35 . Boxing 

James Stevens, '19 Lacrosse 

Lewis W. Thomas, '28 Track 



REPRESENTATIVES 

James Busk k, '35 Tennis 

Charles Remsberg, '2f> Cross Country 

W. C Supim.m , 76 . .Football 

Dr. E. B. Frii 
Dr. A. W. Vale 



t, Z.V, x in,u,dii 

II 1)1 NW \l 1). 'Ill ) . T 

... . ( . . . . At Large 

ai. inline, 04 J 



Cover Picture 

The picture on the cover is of 
Miss Nancy King, of Annapolis, 
Md., who was chosen from a group 
of coed pictures as "Miss Maryland 
for 1939" by Mr. Howard Chandler 
Christy, selector of five "Miss Amer- 
icas". The Terrapin sponsored the 
presentation of "Miss Maryland" as 
a feature of the students' annual. 
Miss King is a freshman and a mem- 
ber of Kappa Kappa Gamma. 



President's Column 

As President Charles W. Sylvester, 
'08, is in Fort Collins, Colo., for this 
month, we do not have a particular 
message from him except a card 
which says, "As soon as I return, we 
will have an Alumni Board meeting 
and get after the membership list." 

Charley Sylvester is a leader 
among men. He is head of the vo- 
cational education for Baltimore 
City, has been President of the 
Scimiter Club of the Shrine, and 
was chairman of the ticket sales 
committee for the recent Shrine 
convention held in Baltimore. In 
1938 he was vice-chairman of the 
Charter Day Celebration of the Uni 
versity. 

The Association is fortunate in 
having an enthusiastic and capable 
leader like Charley to carry on the 
good work of his predecessor, C. 
Walter Cole. Such a leader warrants 
the support of loyal Old Liners to 
carry on the program of our Alumni 
Association. 




Citizens Of Washinston 

Honor Melvin C. Hazen, 



*88 



More than a thousand citizens of Wash- 
ington and vicinity tendered the Hon. 
Melvin C. Hazen, '88, a testimonial din- 
ner on June 26 in honor of his fifty years 
of service to the District of Columbia. 
In addition, a handsome silver service was 
presented him as a token of appreciation 
for his many years of unselfish devotion to 
the inhabitants of the Nation's Capital. 
Mrs. Hazen was by his side and shared in 
the limelight of tributes paid our eminent 
Alumnus. Mr. Hazen, first President of 
vour Alumni Association, entered the en- 
gineer's office of the District of Columbia 
in 1889, one year after his graduation. 
From then on by the fruits of his own ef- 
forts lie has today attained the honor of 
Chairman of the Board of Commissioners 
of the District of Columbia, the scat of 
the Nation's Capital. 

His hobby during his span of life has 
been and still is horses. I Ie was the or- 
ganizer and first president of the National 
Capital Horse Show, which is a feature of 



the Capital's social calendar. His farm is 
located in Virginia, where he keeps many 
head of his pride and joy. 

One of the most picturesque and out- 
standing features of the dinner, held at 
the Mav flower Hotel in Washington, was 
the original carriage in which Mr. and 
Mrs. Hazen began their honevmoon, pic- 
tured above. This was on display in the 
lobby of the Mayflower. 

Press, '28, Secretary 

The dinner was sponsored by the Wash- 
ington Board of Trade, of which William 
Press, '28, is the executive secretarv. 

The Alumni Association can feel quite 
proud of their eminent Alumnus, who was 
the first President of our Association and 
number one man of the Nation's Capital, 
who has been accorded an unprecedented 
honor. The editor of The News is confi- 
dent that he expresses the feeling of every 
Alumnus when he conveys 

"Congratulations and admirations for 
the honors Mr. Hazen has attained." 



Nineteen Nineteen 
Had Great Reunion 

By remote control Erston V. Miller, 
president of the class of '19, started off 
the reunion of his class even though he 
was in Florida. He wrote a letter to Doug 
Wallop, chairman of the reunion, and sug- 
gested that each member give a brief ac- 
count of his activities in the past twenty 
years. Erston started it off bv writing his 
out. He taught in China, took grad work 
at Michigan State College, managed fath- 
er's business and is now doing research 
in biochemical studies of the coloring of 
citrus fruits in Florida. He married Miss 
Elinor Case of Michigan and has three 
children. 

Douglas Wallop has four boys and is 
in the insurance business. 

Pete Chichester is salesmanager for Die- 
trich & Gambrill in Frederick, and has one 
girl. 

J. W. Bolgiano, farming and insurance, 
has three boys and one girl. 

Chester F. Bletch, field man for the 
Maryland -Virginia Milk Producers Asso- 
ciation, has one girl. 

George W. Clendaniel, County Agent 
in Caroline County, has three bovs and 
one girl. 

Ranson R. Lewis, farming, has no chil- 
dren. 

C. E. Payne, lawyer in Washington, has 
no children. 

R. Lee Sullivan, insurance business, one 
boy. 

J. W. Stevens, produce business in Bal- 
timore, has one girl and one boy. 

}. W. Swartz, fur and distillery business 
in Baltimore, has one boy and one girl. 

D. L. McLean, lumber and ship ceiling 
business, has three children. 

M. C. Brown, salesmanager for Wavne 
Gasoline Pumps, has no children. 

Walter R. Hardcsty and H. O. Coster 
got in late — no report. 

It was a grand reunion and they plan 
big things for the twenty-fifth celebra 
tion. 



R. M. Watkins, '23, 
On Park Commission 

Gov. Herbert R. O'Conor, '20, recently 
approved the appointment of R. M. Wat- 
kins, '21, as a member of the Park and 
Planning Commission of the Metropoli- 
tan Area. "Bunt" is also president of the 
Calvert Hills subdivision, a modern resi- 
dential section near College Park. 

Maryland Alumni News 



Class Of *08 Holds 
Annual Reunion 

While some of the classes are holding 
special five-year reunions, the class of 1908 
never missed a single year. Each year there 
is a reunion and they have a big return 
every year. 

Reuben Brigham, secretary, sends quite 
a document to each member, including 
a roster, letters from fellow classmates and 
a personal letter. There were three rather 
interesting letters received from those far 
away. Barny Cooper, in Miami, Florida; 
C. Solari Y. Sevoredo, in Lima, Peru, and 
Mrs. Flora Darling Frey. in California. The 
letters were all very interesting and the 
following excerpts will emphasize their 
spirit: 

From the Letter of Barny C. Cooper: 

"I would like to look over the records 
and see how I stand on the list of grand- 
fathers for my class. I had a grandson 
born February 1, '39, in Miami. I do not 
remember whether vou ever mentioned 
any of the other boys having a grand- 
son or not. Well, send Richard Regi- 
nald Cooper a card telling him who 
I am and what he is. 

From the Letter of Sevoredo in Lima, 
Peru 

"I received today a nice letter from 
Charles Sylvester inviting me and fam- 
ilv to the reunion. As I am not able to 
be with you, I wish to tell everyone how 
happv I would be if I could be with 
them." 

From the Letter Mrs. Frey writes from 
California: : 

"As I picture vou in my mind renew- 
ing old friendships and recalling old 
times, it doesn't really seem possible 
that thirty years have passed away since 
we rallied 'round one bright June morn- 
ing on the campus at M. A. C. for the 
last time before going our separate ways. 
What worlds we were going to conquer, 
and what deep niches we were going 
to carve in the halls of fame! What 
manv of you have accomplished is a 
lasting tribute to the training and guid- 
ance of that patient group of teachers 
who worked long and steadfastly with 
us and in my memorv lingers verv grate- 
fullv the name of Prof. Novik. I learned 
from him tolerance and tactfulness, for 
how else could he have managed a class 
of exuberant voung men and a solitarv 
young woman and how admirably and 
wisely he rose to every emergency when 
the occasion demanded. 

July, 1939 



ALUMNI PRESIDENT 




C. W. Sylvester, '08 



"I wish I might see the University as 
it stands today, but I am afraid I should 
be rather overwhelmed with the size of 
the student body and the many new 
buildings which have replaced the old 
ones of our period. It is a wonderful ad- 
vancement for the young people who 
are coming from all parts of the State 
and I am especially happv that so manv 
girls have found their places in the 
school. I am glad if in a very small wav 
I helped a little in opening the door of 
opportunity to them. 

"With deepest regret that I cannot 
be with you and a hope that today will 
bring back many of the class for a re- 
newal of friendship and delightful recol- 
lections of our own days at school, I 
am, as ever." 

The class of '08 are exhibiting real class 
spirit. 

Maryland State Society 
Reelects Col. Calvert, '92 

When the annual meeting of the Mary- 
land State Societv was held this spring 
Col. George H. Calvert, Jr., '92, was re- 
elected president for the sixteenth consec- 
utive year. Colonel Calvert is a prominent 
attorney of Maryland and Washington, 
D. C. He is a direct descendant of the late 
Hon. Charles B. Calvert, founder of the 
College Park Schools of the University in 
1856. 



Bureau Of Fisheries 
Building $100,000 Lab 

A new SI I'll. ODD building to house expel 
imental and research laboratories is to be 
erected by the United States Bureau of 
Fisheries at the University of Maryland in 
College Park. 

The new building will house laboratory 
units which two years ago were moved to 
the University from Gloucester, Mass. 
With the completion of the structure more 
than two-thirds of all the fisheries lab- 
oratory work centered in College Park, Dr. 
H. C. Byrd, President of the University, 
declared. 



Bill Warfield 
Experiments With Beans 

"We don't know enough about beans," 
was the comment which started Bill War- 
field, '36, now the head vegetable breeder 
at Fordhook Farms in Pennsylvania, prop- 
erty of the Burpee Seed Company. He 
was requested by M. David Burpee to grow 
in their trial gardens, every known garden 
bean in the world. "Why, we have the 
best beans on earth," said Bill, "but we 
will try them and see for ourselves." 

"Garden beans are natives of this con- 
tinent, having been discovered here by 
Columbus. Also the American Gardneners 
have been consistently ahead of the proces- 
sion in beans ever since N. B. Keeney dis- 
covered the world's first stringless bean in 
New York," says Bill Warfield. 

But to prove his statement he rounded 
up beans from every continent in the 
world. He wrangled beans from Uncle 
Sam's wandering seed hunters in manv 
lands. All together, he gathered 66 indi- 
vidual varieties and grow them at the Ford- 
hook Farms. At the end of the season Bill 
told his boss, "we've been eating beans a 
dozen times a day and there isn't a bean 
among them that an American housewife 
would have on a bet, except a few of our 
own varieties that foreign growers have 
renamed." But he did discover some good 
characteristics among the foreign beans 
which he plans to breed into our American 
bean. 

The last sentence tells another storv. It 
used to be that seed people would travel 
thousands of miles to find plants or vege- 
tables already made bv nature. But today, 
vegetable originators build the plants to 
order by cross breeding. 

This is William C. Warfield's, '36, job 
at the Burpee Fordhook Farms. 

5 



Far Eastern Alumni Group 

Holds Meeting In Manila; 

Peach, *03, and Saunders, *I0 



When Preston L. Peach, '03, returned 
to Kaula Lumpur, in the Federated Malaya 
States, he stopped in Manila long enough 
to have lunch and hold an Alumni Meet- 
ing with Lt. Col. (). H. Saunders, '10, In- 
spector General of the Philippines. 

Colonel Saunders had previously visited 
the home of Mr. Peach, who was away in 
the States at the time. This was in De 
cember, 1938. Then Peach and Saunders 
met in Manila in February and the account 
of the meeting arrived at College Park 
in June. 

According to Saunders, Peach is a very 
modest man, because he really found out 
about him while he was away. Peach is a 
three-hat man besides managing and di- 
recting about 120 schools and 800 teach- 
ers for about 20,000 pupils. 

Alumni Meeting 

The Alumni Meeting was held at Saun- 
ders' home on February 13, in Manila. The 
accompanying picture shows the two fam- 
ilies standing in the shadow 7 of Old Fort 
Santiago, the original fort built by the 
Spaniards in 1593 — and is the oldest fort 
over which flies the American flag. 

The visit and Alumni Meeting came to 
a very quick close when Peach went to 
the phone to check on the sailing time of 
his ship which, he had been told, would 
be the following Wednesday. The steam- 
ship company called back and said the 
boat was sailing at that moment from a 
pier about 30 blocks away. Peach said, 
"But my dear fellow, I'm a passenger on 




Mr. and Mrs. Peach 
Col. and Mrs. Saunders 



that boat and vou can't sail without me." 
Saunders thought him very mild. However, 
the company agreed to hold the boat 
twenty minutes and there was some fast 
gathering of baggage and wild auto riding 
to get the boat, but as the gang plank went 
up so did Peach on his way to Singapore. 
"Quite an unceremonious way to usher a 
guest from a lunch and an Alumni Meet- 
ing," said Saunders. 

Saunders Returning 

Colonel Saunders is returning to the 
States in September and will be stationed 
at Fort Howard in Baltimore. He will re- 
ceive another promotion at the same time, 
becoming a full Colonel. 

While in the Orient he has been in 
China, Japan, Indo-China, Siam and the 
Federated Malaya States. A welcome awaits 
Colonel Saunders in Baltimore. 



Summer School Well Attended R.O.T.C. Boys Win Rifle Honors 



Keeping up with the regular University 
trend, the Summer School for 1939 was 
well attended. Approximately 1,400 stu- 
dents, including teachers in public and 
private schools, as well as many seeking 
graduate degrees, were enrolled. 
• 

Aviator-Ensign Bob Slye, '36, of the 
United States Navy Flying Squadron, vis- 
ited the campus near Alumni Day. Bob 
will be remembered as one of Geary Epp- 
ley's timber-toppers of the Terp tracksters. 
Bob has been transferred to the Pacific 
coast, where he will do more maneuver- 
ing with the dive bombing squadron. 



When the rifle competition was held 
at the annual R. O. T. C. summer en- 
campment at Camp Meade, Maryland boys 
corralled their share of honors. Out of 
eleven bovs selected to go to the National 
competition, five were Terps. 

Willard C. Jensen, a junior engineer, 
was high man and has been chosen team 
captain. Others to qualify were Bob Laug- 
head, Merle Preble, George Meeks, and 
Tom Coleman. All made expert riflemen 
over a course requiring the firing of 70 
rounds. 

The procedure is as follows: The entire 
battalion fires the range; from this, thirty- 



Poultry Building Dedicated; 
Gov. O'Conor Present 

More than one hundred and thirty-five 
delegates from thirty nine nations took 
part in the Poultry Building dedicator) 
exercises at College Park, on Julv 26. His 
Excellency, Herbert R. O'Conor, '20, 
LL.B.. Governor of Maryland, was the 
guest of honor and officially extended 
greetings to the assembled delegates of the 
World Poultry Congress. The Governor 
was introduced by Dr. H. C. Byrd, '08, 
who first welcomed the delegates and poul- 
trymen to the University campus. The oc- 
casion was Maryland's Poultry Dav, held 
prior to the opening of the World's Poul- 
try Congress to be held in Cleveland, Ohio. 
The exercises were held in the Agriculture 
Auditorium which was decorated with flags 
of many nations. 

Buffet Luncheon 

Following the exercises the delegates and 
almost a thousand poultry men of Mary- 
land were guests of the University at a 
buffet luncheon held on the campus. 

In the afternoon a tour of inspection 
was conducted through the new poultry 
plant of brooder houses, laving pens, etc., 
now under construction. The new poultry 
building is located east of the Horticulture 
Building and is expected to be completed 
in the fall. 

The formal dedication was conducted by 
Mr. Harry H. Reick, president of the Mary- 
land Poultrymcn's Association, and Mr. 
Charles E. Pynchon, executive assistant of 
the Public Works Administration of the 
Federal Government. 

Dr. Jull Presides 

Dr. James E. Rice, Professor Emeritus 
of the Poultry Department of Cornell Uni- 
versity, was the principal speaker. Mr. Karl 
Vetter of Germany, president of the 
World's Poultry Science Association, and 
Mr. Vezzani of Italy and Mr. Kock of 
Denmark, past presidents, gave brief re- 
sponses to the Governor's words of greet- 
ing. Dr. T. B. Symons, '02, Director of 
Extension Service, gave a talk on the Poul- 
try Industry of Maryland. Dr. Morley Jull, 
Head of the University's Poultry Depart- 
ment, was the presiding officer at the exer- 
cises. He is also secretary for the World's 
Poultry Congress being held in Cleveland, 
Ohio. 

five men were chosen. Then the thirty-five- 
competed, out of which eleven were se- 
lected, according to their score, to go to 
Camp Perry, Ohio, for the National Rifle 
Matches. 

Maryland AUimni News 



Old Line Athletic Contributions 



By W. H. ("Bill") HOTTEL: 



Terp Stickmen Gain 
National Crown 

Maryland's lacrosse team has been ac- 
claimed the 1939 national collegiate cham- 
pion by the United States Intercollegiate 
Lacrosse Association in an announcement 
made by Rovce N. Flippin, president of 
the ruling organization. 

The Terps earned the title over Navy 
by beating the Middies in a battle at An- 
napolis, 5 to 3, although the Sailors, like 
Maryland, lost only one collegiate game 
during the season. 

Maryland's lone defeat was at the hands 
of Johns Hopkins, 6 to 3, in the final 
game of the campaign and came the Sat- 
urday following the grueling contest with 
the Navy. Hopkins, a mighty fine team, 
was at its peak that day while the Terps 
were below the standard they had shown 
in previous games. Several players were 
pretty well battered, Rip Hewitt, in par- 
ticular, having a bandaged hand that was 
of little use to him. 

Maryland has been to the forefront in 
lacrosse three times in the past four 
years, gaining the title outright in 1936, 
sharing it with Princeton in 1937 and los- 
ing it in 1938 by bowing to Navy, 8 to 7, 
after having a 7-to-3 lead. 

Maryland will suffer only two great 
losses from the squad, Jim Meade, all- 
America second defense, and Hewitt, in 
home, who led the Terps in scoring with 
26 goals. 

Maryland's surprising 11-to-l defeat of 
Mount Washington, which eventually won 
the national club honors, may have had 
some bearing on its selection for the top 
post, as the Mounts later scored over Navy 
by a one-point margin. 

Jack Faber, head coach, and Al Heagy, 
defense mentor, turned out a polished 
Maryland outfit that at the outset did not 
figure to hang up such a fine record, 
o 

Dobson Recovering 
From Illness 

Frank M. Dobson, Maryland's popular 
head football coach, is recovering from a 
sudden and serious illness that attacked 
him early in June while he was at West 
Point seeing his son, Jack, graduated from 
the Military Academy. 




Lacrosse Coaches — Heagy, '30, Faber, '26, and Manager, O'Neili . '39 



Jim Meade To Play 
With Redskins 

Jim Meade, who starred on the grid and 
lacrosse field for Maryland over a stretch 
of three years, will try his hand at pro 
football this fall with the Washington 
Redskins. 

Meade, who was an outstanding back 
for Maryland for two seasons, saw little 
action last fall, as he suffered a broken 
ankle in the game with Penn State on 
October 1 and never returned to the 
line-up. 

He had shown enough in the two pre- 
vious seasons, however, to convince George 
Marshall, owner of the Capital City team, 
that he had enough of what it takes to 
make good in the exacting pro game. 

Meade, who is 6 feet 1 inch tall, and 
scales above 190, is sturdy, a fast starter, 
an excellent kicker, and able on defense. 

It would be surprising if he failed to 
make the grade. 

Dobson was in a hospital for quite a 
while after returning from West Point 
but now is at his home in the Westchester 
Apartments in Washington and gradually 
returning to normal. 

It is hoped and expected that he will 
be ready to take full charge of the Terp 
gridders when they report for practice at 
College Park on September 1. 

He again will have Jack Faber and Al 
Heagy as his aides and they have melded 
into a smooth trio in the several years 
they have worked together. 



Places For Two Grid 
Games Shifted 

Maryland has adjusted the sites of some 
of its 1939 football games so that it will 
have two "home" contests in Baltimore 
and three at College Park. Five others will 
be played on its hosts' fields. 

It has been decided to play the Western 
Maryland game of October 7 in the Bal- 
timore Stadium and to entertain Syracuse 
at College Park on November 25. This is 
just the reverse of the original listings. It 
was done primarily because Washington 
and Lee will be plaved in the Baltimore 
Stadium on Thanksgiving, just five days 
after Syracuse is met. 

Hampden-Svdney in the opener on Sep- 
tember 20 and Florida for homecoming on 
October 28 provide the other games at 
College Park. 

Georgetown, to be plaved in Washing- 
ton on November 11, also may be counted 
as a "home" tilt. 

Here is the revised list: 

Sept. 30 — Hampden-Svdnev at College 
Park. 

Oct. 7 — Western Maryland at Baltimore 
Stadium. 

Oct. 14 — Virginia at Charlottesville. 

Oct. 21 — Rutgers at New Brunswick. 

Oct. 28— Florida at College Park 
(Homecoming). 

Nov. 4 — Penn State at State College. 

Nov. 11 — Georgetown at Washington. 

Nov. 18 — Virginia Military Institute at 
Norfolk Stadium. 

Nov. 25 — Syracuse at College Park. 

Nov. 30 — (Thanksgiving) — Washing- 
ton and Lee at Baltimore 
Stadium. 



July, 1939 



Graduate Employment 

An editorial in the Baltimore Sun gives 
encouraging news to College graduates. 
Employment opportunities for graduates 
look good. The following is a reprint of 
the editorial, by permission of the Balti 
more Evening Sun. 

Jobs For Graduates — College gradu- 
ates of the current vintage, greeting. From 
a source which we regard as unimpeach- 
able, comes good news. (Well, fairly good 
news.) Mr. King Merritt, vice-president 
of Investors Syndicate, in an interview with 
Consolidated News Features, has an- 
nounced that "job prospects of college 
graduates this year are brighter than for 
several years." 

You may recall that when 155,000 of 
you were getting ready for commence- 
ment on June 1, we delivered a baccalaur- 
eate sermon in which we pointed out a few 
facts obtained from the United States De- 
partment of the Interior. A study made by 
the Department's Office of Education 
showed that 98 per cent, of college men 
and 99 per cent, of college women have 
never been on relief, and that out of 46,000 
alumni of 31 major universities and col- 
leges, only 4 per cent, of the men and 7 
per cent, of the women are now unem- 
ployed. The information furnished by Mr. 
Merritt is still more specific. He has com- 
piled divisions of the country, showing 
the percentages of this year's graduation 
crop who will land jobs this summer. Here 
it is: 

Division Pei Cent. 

West South Central . 9lYz 

Mountain States 88 

West North Central ... . 78 ? /4 

East South Central 78 5 /4 

Pacific States 76 Yi 

New England 75 1 /i 

South Atlantic 71 

East North Central 68Y2 

Middle Atlantic 62 Yi 

If this surprises vou, it surprises us no 
less. The West South Central division, 
which tops the list, includes Arkansas, 
Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas — and we 
hadn't heard anything about a business 
boom down that way. The Middle Atlan- 
tic States (New York, New Jersey and 
Pennsylvania, in Mr. Merritt's table) are 
right on the bottom — for which there is 
no ready explanation, either. This year's 
graduates most in demand "are those qual- 
ified for teaching, engineering, business 
administration, salesmanship, medicine, 



RETIRES THIS YEAR 




Dr. W. S. Small 
Retiring Dean of the College of Education 



law, accounting, agriculture, insurance, 
home economics, journalism, secretarial 
work and the ministry, in the order 
named." Due to rapid industrialization, 
the South Atlantic States offer a good 
field for engineers. Salesmanship ranks 
high in the Middle Atlantic States. Ac- 
cording to Mr. Merritt, employers in all 
sections rate character first, scholarship 
second and adaptability third. Personality 
takes fourth place, so you had better not 
rely too strongly on that winning smile. 

Pooling the information furnished by 
Mr. Merritt and the Department of the 
Interior, we reach the conclusion that 
though 8V2 per cent, of you who live in 
the West South Central Division and 37 Y2 
per cent, of you who inhabit the Middle 
Atlantic States will still be looking for 
jobs at the end of the summer, all but 
a very small percentage of you will have 
found something to do before the next 
graduation crop comes on the market in 
June, 1940. 

Note — The information so presented 
seems to bring back the yesteryear advice 
of "Go West, Young Man, Go West." 
However, it is our belief that business con- 
ditions will soon take another upturn and 
the 29 per cent, in the South Atlantic 
States (including Maryland) will dimin- 
ish to a one-figure percentage. Keep in 
touch with the Alumni Office as you never 
know when your opportunity will appear. 



Dr. W. S. Small Retires; 

Successor Appointed 

Educator and author, Dr. Harold Benja- 
min has been appointed Dean of the Col- 
lege of Education, to succeed Dr. W. S. 
Small, who retires this year after fifteen 
years of service in the University. 

Dr. Small can be commended for much 
of the development and advancement of 
the College of Education. He will be re- 
membered by many Alumni whom he 
helped on the road of education. 

Dr. Benjamin, formerly Dean of the 
College of Education, and Director of 
Summer School at the University of Colo- 
rado, brings quite a background in the de- 
velopment of secondary education. He is 
a graduate of Oregon in '21 and three years 
later got his Master's degree. In 1937 he 
got his Doctor's degree from Stanford. 
He served at the University of Minnesota 
as Assistant Dean of Education before go- 
ing to Colorado. 

He is a member of Phi Beta Kappa, and 
has been a delegate at numerous national 
and international educational conventions. 

He belongs to many educational societies, 
including the National Society of College 
Teachers of Education. 

During the World War he served with 
the 17th U. S. Artillery and the Army of 
Occupation. He was on the Mexican Border 
in 1916 with the Oregon Militia. He is 
married and has two sons and a daughter. 

Dr. Benjamin will assume his duties at 
College Park in September. 

Sasscer, '04, President, 
Entomology Society 

President of the American Association 
of Economic Entomology is E. Ralph 
Sasscer, '04, of the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture. Ralph was elected at 
the annual meeting in December and will 
preside at the next meeting in Columbus, 
Ohio. The Association has approximately 
1,400 members and publishes the Journal 
of Economic Entomology. His class held 
their thirty-fifth reunion on Alumni Day 
and a real reunion it was. Ralph is in the 
Department of Entomology of the United 
States Department of Agriculture. 
• 

Radio — Conductor of "Every Woman's 
Hour" over Station WFBR in Baltimore 
is Martha Ross Temple, '31, M.S. '32, and 
a member of A. O. Pi. Her address is 
Chadford Apartments, 909 W. University 
Parkway, Baltimore, Maryland. 



Maryland Alumni News 



McAboy, '36, Becomes 
Ensign In Naval Aviation 

Among several flying cadets to receive 
promotions and the rank of Ensign in 
Naval Aviation on July 1 last was Lyman 
McAboy, '36, a former Terp boxing star. 
He is also a member of the Sigma Nn 
fraternity and a graduate in physical edu- 
cation. 

McAboy's home is in Washington, D. 
C, and his first assignment in the Navy 
is San Diego, Calif. 

Pres. Magers, '14, LLB., 
Visits College Park 

The College Park Alumni Association 
had the honor of welcoming very dis- 
tinguished guests on Alumni Day in the 
persons of the Hon. John F. Magers, 14. 
President of the Law Alumni Association. 
and Mrs. Magers. 

The first event Mr. and Mrs. Magers at- 
tended was the Dedicatory Exercises at the 
Rossbourg Inn and was John pleased when 
he was met bv the Colonial Dames and 
escorted through the building! It was hard 
to tell which interested John the most, 
the building or the dames. We wonder. 

It was a pleasure to have Mr. and Mrs. 
Magers with us for the Alumni Dinner 

following the exercises. 

• 

Mary Harbaugh Campbell, 
Air Derby Winner 

In an aerial fox hunt, taking off from the 
College Park Airport, Mary Harbaugh 
Campbell, '27, won second place in a 
competition with more experienced fliers. 
Man had her first solo flight just three 
weeks prior to the meet, but observers 
praised her for handling the plane like 
a veteran. 

The fox was George C. Brinkcrhoff, pro- 
prietor of the airport. With a 45-minute 
headstart, he landed four times in a 30-mile 
square area, divided into quadrants, and 
pinned down a 6-foot marker. The hunters, 
knowing only that there was a marker in 
each quadrant, were required to locate 

them on the maps thev carried. 

• 

Appointed To Faculty At Vassar 

Mildred Hearn, '37, M.S. '38. has been 
appointed to the faculty at Vassar College 
as director of the cooperative house and 
assistant director of the halls. Mildred will 
also do some teaching in nutritions, her 
major subject in study for her Master's 
degree. 



Grapevine News About Those We Know 



Visitors — From East Orange, N. J., were 
Mr. and Mrs. Denzel Davis ( nee Nancy 
Brice, '38). Denzel now is with the Ohio 
Injector Company as representative for 
New Jersey, New York and Connecticut 
area. 

The Daviscs reside in East Orange and 
thev plan to get an Alumni Group started 
there where there seems to be quite a 
few Maryland grads around. While at- 
tending a plav on the outskirts of New 
York Denzel and Nancy saw Fred Has- 
kin, '36, a Phi Delta Theta. Fred has 
finished his theological study and now has 
a church in Chicago. 

Nancv has agreed to be the East Or- 
ange correspondent for The Alumni 
News. Thank you, Nancy, 
o 

Married — Graduates of '38 unite. Miss 

Isabel Hamilton and James Turnbull took 

the step in June. Bob Walton, '38, was 

best man, Warren Gilbertson, '38, usher. 

Their honeymoon included the World's 

Fair and points north. James is a grad in 

education and is now with the Federal 

Government. The newlyweds are residing 

in Hyattsville. 

O 

Birth — Another Cobey. Mr. and Mrs. 
W. W. Cobev have a son, W. W\, Jr., 
born May 13. Mrs. Cobey was formerly 
Miss Mary Gray Munroe, of Ouincy. 
Florida. "Bill." as he is better known, is 
cashier in the Financial Office of the Uni- 
versity. He is the son of the late W. W. 
Cobev, 01. The Cobevs reside on Clag- 
gett Road in University Park, Md. 


Married — William Miles Hanna, '32. 
and Miss Carolvn Louise Whiteford, of 
Whiteford, Md., were married on July 6 
at the home of the bride. Mrs. Hanna is 
the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry C. 
Whiteford. Mr. Whiteford is a graduate 
of the University of Maryland in 1901, 
and a past President of the Alumni Asso- 
ciation . 

Mr. Hanna is a member of Alpha Gam- 
ma Rho and now is principal of the Dub- 
lin High School, where Mrs. Hanna for- 
merly taught French and English. 

The newlyweds will reside in Bel Air. 

Md. 

o 

Birth — Mr. and Mrs. Allen Blanchard 
(nee Bettv Franklin) announce the arrival 
of a babv boy and will call him Allen, Jr. 



Birth — Mr. and Mrs. John Cotton have 
a baby boy named John, Jr. Mrs. Cotton 
was formerly Miss Marion Hoglund of 
Washington. John is a member of Alpha 
Gamma Rho and a grad in the class of '34. 



Congress — David J. Ward, Jr.. '32, is 
the son of Representative David J. Ward, 
elected to the United States Congress to 
the term vacated by the resignation of 
Judge Allan Goldsborough. Dave is cm- 
ployed in Salisbury. 

O 

Married — News is finallv out that Miss 
Audrey Killian, '28, and James E. Zulick. 
'28, are now Mr. and Mrs. Zulick. Audrey 
is the well-known figure who, for a number 
of years, has been an important member 
of the Dining Hall staff and now is di- 
rector. Jim, as his friends call him, is 
Educational Supervisor and Director for 
the Third Corps Area of the C. C. C. 
Camps. 

O 

Librarian — Jean Patterson, '38, former 
Queen of the May, now is librarian for 
the State Department of Public Welfare 
in Baltimore. Jean is the daughter of Dr. 
Alex Patterson, D.D.S., '11. 



To Wed— Willie Wolfe, '38, the former 
all-Marvland guard on the Terp eleven, 
and Miss Virginia Crossfield, of Virginia, 
plan to wed this fall. Willie is with the 
McCormick Companv of Baltimore and 
stationed in Knoxvillc. Tenn. The news 
became known while Willie was on his 
vacation, during which time he paid the 
old campus a visit. His address in Knox 
ville is 116 Hillsboro Heights. 



Married — Miss Mary Leslie Stallings. 
'35, and Mr. Creighton R. Coleman were 
married on June 24 at the Washington 
Cathedral. Mrs. Coleman is a graduate 
with first honors in Arts and Sciences, a 
member of Alpha Omicron Pi and Mortar 
Board. The newlyweds will reside in Wash- 
ington, where Mr. Coleman is employed. 



Manager — Ossie Beck, '31, it has been 
learned, is manager of the Washington of- 
fice for the International Harvester Com- 
pany. 



July, 1939 



ADVANCED 
DEGREES 



Grapevine News About Those We Know 



Several Alumni were among those to 
receive advanced degrees at the Commence- 
ment Exercises. Four who received their 
Doctor of Philosophy were: 

Earnest A. Walker, '26. in Plant Path- 
ology, is a member of Delta Psi Omega. 

Howard Livingston Steir, '32, in Hor- 
ticulture, a member of Alpha Gamma Rho. 

Walter F. Jeffers, '35, in Plant Path- 
ology. 

John Kavanaugh Wolfe, '36, in Organ- 
ic Chemistry, a member of Alpha Chi Sig- 
ma. 

In the Master of Arts, five received their 
advanced degrees: 

Samuel Preston Caltrider, '31, in Edu- 
cation, of Westminster, Md., a first honor 
student in Agricultural Education. 

Temple R. Jarrell, '35, in Education, 
former student head of the physical edu- 
cation program and son of an Alumnus. 

Miss Margaret Barbara Pahlman, '3"". in 
Education. 

Miss Kathleen McCallman Shearer, '38, 
in Sociology. 

Miss Vivian Doris Wiser, '38, in His- 
tory. 

In the field of Master of Science, seven- 
teen achieved the distinction: 

John Raymond Stewart, '24, in Agri- 
cultural Economics, now a superintendent 
of Agriculture in Pennsylvania. 

John P. Bewley, '31, in Soils. 

James Glenn Graham, '35, in Zoology, 
a member of Alpha Lambda Tau. 

Edward P. Carter, '36, in Plant Path- 
ology. 

Arthur B. Buddington, '36, in Ento- 
mology. 

Nathan Gammon. Jr., '36, in Soils, a 
member of Alpha Chi Sigma. 

Roy Carlton Dawson, '37, in Bacteriol 
ogy. 

Mary Washington Frazer, '37, in Bac- 
teriology. 

William Anthony Nolte, '37, in Bac- 
teriology. 

James McClain Osborn, '37, in Chem- 
istry. 

Virginia Eleanor Thomas, '37, in Ento- 
mology. 

Marriott Warfield Bradekamp, '38, in 
Chemical Engineering, a member of Delta 
Sigma Phi. 

Ann Elizabeth Carver, '38, in Bacteri- 
ology, a member of Kappa Kappa Gamma. 

Mildred Louise Hearn, '38, in Home 
Economics — nutrition, a member of Delta 
Delta Delta. 

Amihud Kramer, '38, in Horticulture. 

Albin Owings Kulm, '38, in Agronomy, 
a member of Alpha Gamma Rho. 

Winthrop Charles Wolfe, '38, in Chem- 
istry. 



Birth— Mr. and Mrs. Claude H. Smith 

announce the birth of a son. Claude, Jr., 

on October 19. 1938, at Garfield Hospital. 

The Smiths also have a daughter, Elaine 

Joy, who was three years old in October. 

Mrs. Smith was formerly Gene Wright, 

'30, a member of A. O. Pi. "Smitty", '32, 

is an A. T. O., and was President of the 

Student Government Association. Both 

parents were elected the "student who had 

done the most for the University" in the 

Year Book contest. 

o 

Birth — In November, 1938, Mr. and 
Mrs. Robert Straka announced the arrival 
of a future halfback, now weighing 7 
pounds and 1 1 ounces. Mrs. Straka was 
formerly Miss Ruth Comare of Ames, 
Iowa. Bob is second in command at the 
Agricultural Bv Products Laboratories. He 
can also be called Dr. Straka as he has his 
Ph.D. degree from Iowa State College. 


Married — Henry E. Duke, '24, and Miss 
Eleanor Rhea Mathews of Raleigh, N. C, 
and Spartanburg, S. C. Duke, originally 
from North Carolina State, finished at 
Maryland in 1924, became connected with 
his uncle, Captain Emerson of the Emer- 
son Drug Company. Now Duke is vice- 
president of the Willard Oil Co. of South 
Carolina. 

P. D. Saunders, '24, editor of the South- 
ern Planter, was best man. 
O 

Married — Frank Patrick Duggan, '36, 
a member of Phi Delta Theta, and Miss 
Beatrix Rash Phillips of Sudlersville, Md., 
were married October 22, last, 
o 

Married — Urban T. Linzev, Jr., '30, 
and Miss Norma Crable of Cresshill, N. J., 
were married June 11, last. 
O 

Chemist — Robert Barnctt, '38, is a 
chemist with the Government at the Naval 
Experiment Station. 


F. B. I. — Joe Keller, '38, now is a mem- 
ber of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, 
located in Washington, D. C. 

O 
Law — Hubert K. Arnold, '35, and a 
recent grad of the Duke Law School is 
to be located in New York, where he will 
be connected with the firm of James Max- 
well Fassette, 60 Wall Street. 



Birth — In April Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
Littleford announced the arrival of a baby 
girl, Angela Jeanne, who is living with her 
parents at Solomons Island. Mrs. Littleford 
is the former Genevieve Everett, '37, and 
Bob Littleford, '33, is Associate Zoologist 
of the Chesapeake Biological Laboratory. 


Labor — In the Statistical Division of the 
Department of Labor we find Bonson S. 

Davison, '18. 

c 

Engaged — Miss Jane Hoffman, '38, of 

Kappa Kappa Gamma, and Edwin D. Long, 

Jr., '38, of Phi Delta Theta, are among the 

engaged. Ed is in business with his dad 

at Westover, Md. 



Foods — Helen Somers is really getting 
the food business training. At present she 
is in charge of the bakery counter for 
Woodward & Lothrop. Prior to that she 
had served in the tea room, the fountain 
room and the foods department. Helen is 
a member of Tri Delta and now resides at 
1113 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

O 

Married — At the beginning of the year 
1938 Gilbert Teal, '37, and Miss Jane Cor- 
bett, '37, were married in Hancock, Md. 
Alumni in the bridal party were Edmund 
F. Yocum, '32, best man; Philip McCurdy, 
'37, and David Wallace, '36, ushers; brides- 
maids were Anna L. Keplinger, '37, Eliza- 
beth McFarland, '36, and Nell Conner, 
'35. Teal now is employed as safety en- 
gineer for the Travelers Insurance Co. in 
the New York office. He was recently 
awarded a fellowship for graduate study 
in safety education at New York Univer- 
sity. 

o 

Connecticut — Word has drifted in that 
Jack Tunis is with the Remington Arms 
Company, in Bridgeport, Conn. 
O 

Married — Dr. Otto Mathcke, '34. and 
Miss Elsa Calkins of Cohocs, N. Y., were 
married on July 1. Otto is a practicing 
physician in East Orange, N. J. 


Lawyer — Ernie Haines, '30, who mar- 
ried Ruth Hayes of Washington, is living 
in Wcstficld, N. Y. Ernie is with the 
Standard Oil Company of New York in 
the legal department. 



10 



Maryland Alumni News 



Pharmacy Schools Receive 
$4,200 For Fellowships 

For the purpose of cooperating in phar- 
maceutical research, the William R. War- 
ner and Co.. Inc.. have contributed $4,200 
to establish the fellowship in the Phar- 
macy School. 

It was through Dr. Marvin R. Thomp- 
son, formerly a member of the Pharmacy 
School faculty that the contribution was 
made. 

Three University of Maryland graduates 
have received appointments for the fellow 
ships, which are for one vcar: Dr. M. F. 
W. Dunker. Ph.G., '33; Mr. Kenneth 
Hamlin. B.S., '38, and Mr. George Hager, 
B.S.. '38. 

Mr. G. A. Pfciffcr. vice-president of the 
Warner Company, writes Dean DuMez: 
"I trust this will mark the beginning of a 
long and fruitful cooperative relationship 
in scientific research." 
o 

Married — Miss Jane Kephart. '39. and 
Ralph Kellar. '38, were married on June 
24 in Takoma Park. Md. Jane is a mem- 
ber of Kappa Delta and a past president of 
Mortar Board. Ralph now is Athletic Di- 
rector in the Richard Montgomery High 
School, is a member of Delta Sigma Phi. 
The ncwlyweds will reside in Rockville, 

Md. 



Business — In the Remington-Rand office 
in Washington we find Dan Drake, '37, 
Ernest Lundell, '37, Henry Johnson, '39, 
and Johnny Bell. '37. Thev are in the 
business system division. 
O 

Visitors — Into the Alumni Office came 
Miss Erna Riedel, '34, and Rav Chapman, 
'35, one day this summer. Erna now is 
teaching Home Economics in the Wash 
ington high schools. Ray is located in Pitts- 
burgh with the Worthington Pump Com- 
pany. 



Dyer and Price 

Consultant Engineers 

Two Maryland graduates in Engineer- 
ing have opened offices in Hyattsville. un- 
der the name of Dyer & Price, better 
known as Ben Dyer, '31, and Milly Price, 
'30. 

Ben married Miss Katherine Perry of 
Dallas, Texas, and they reside at 204 
Jackson Avenue, University Park, Md. Ben 
is a member of K. A. and O. D. K. He is 
a former cadet major in the R. O. T. C. 

Milly is a K. A., married Miss Marga- 
ret Armcntrout of Washington, and they 
have a young son. Milton. Jr.. in their 
home at 300 Roosevelt Street, Bethesda, 
Md. A former lacrosse player, Milly also 
won the R. O. T. C. platoon drill. 
• 

Married — Miss Dorcas R. Teal, '37, and 
Mr. Augustus R. Glasgow were married 
Julv 13. Mrs. Glasgow has been teaching 
at the Bladenshurg High School. Mr. Glas- 
gow got his Master of Science in Chem- 
istry at the University this past year. He 
is regularly employed at the Bureau of 

Standards. 

O 

Georgia — Robert White, '16, is in At- 
lanta, Ga., with the Armour Fertilizer Com- 
pany, according to Ray Chapman, who was 

formerly in Atlanta. 
O 

Beach — Bob Wiley, '31, and Bert Eby, 

'32, were seen at North Beach, Md. Bert 

is in the law profession in Washington. 
O 

Ayrsh ires— Jack D. Hartman, '39, M.S., 

is with the Ayrshire Breeders' Association 

in Brandon, Vermont. This was received in 

reply to a notice sent to Jack about an 

opening in his field. 
O 

Law — Gerald D. Fasbrook, '37, a former 

member of the Terrapin, now is attending 

Harvard Law School. He visited the campus 

during the Summer Session. 



James Stevens, '19, 
Butter And Egg Man 

This vcar James W. (Jimmie) Stevens, 
'19, is the chief butter and egg man of 
Baltimore, in fact of the country. The 
reason is that Jimmy is vice-president of 
the National Poultry. Butter and Egg As- 
sociation as well as general chairman for 
the Association's convention to be held 
in Baltimore. October 8 to 10. this fall. 
Nearly 1,000 members and their wives 
are expected to attend the meeting. 

A visit to the Poultry Department of 
the University of Maryland is a part of 
the program. Jimmy is a member of the 
firm of Stevens Brothers, wholesale bakers, 
of Baltimore. 

Telephone — In the Central Office of 
the C. & P. Telephone Company is Ed- 
ward Siddell, '31, K. A. His sisters, Mrs. 
Blanche Dulin, '32, and Mrs. Emily S. 
Gray, makes three Alumni in that family. 
O 

C. C. C. — Bernard F. Brims, '36, a mem 
ber of Theta Chi and a Lieutenant in the 
Officers Reserve Corp, is in charge of a 
C. C. C. camp at Laport, Pa. He is a grad- 
uate of Engineering and has taken a year's 
course in the Army. His sister, Helen, at- 
tended Summer School this year. 
O 

Buffalo — Nellie Buckey, '25, a member 
of Kappa Delta, taught Home Economics 
during Summer School. Nellie was on leave 
from Buffalo Teachers College, where she 
is a member of the faculty. 
O 

Following the death of Charles E. Brid- 
dell, Sr.. this past year, Charles E. Briddell, 
Jr., '35, has been named president of the 
Briddell Hardware Manufacturing Com- 
pany of Crisfield, Md. With him are his 
two brothers, Thomas, '36, who is vice- 
president, and in charge of sales. Willis 
handles the accounting and office. 



CUT ON THIS LINE 



THE NEW YEAR DRIVE IS ON 

/ill You Join Your Fellow Alumni? 



Fellow Alumni: 

vish to be a contributing member of 
University of Maryland Alumni As- 
iation, and am enclosing the usual 
Dunt of $2.00 for the year 1939-1940, 
this fifty cents is for one year's sub- 
ption to the Alumni News. 



r PLEASE FILL OUT AND RETURN THIS BLANK NOW ! ! 



Occupation 



Name _ ...Class 

Address 

Married? To whom Children 

Business address Title 



J: 

: 

; 



M 




A Glorious jf~\ 
Combination A 



Copyright 1939, Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. 



^ ...the right combination 

of the world's best cigarette tobaccos 

Day after day there's added proof that for 
more smoking pleasure Chesterfield is America's 
choice. When a man or a woman turns to Chest- 
erfield, he finds out and she finds out what real 
mildness means in a cigarette. 

And Chesterfields have a taste and pleasing 
aroma that smokers like. They really Satisfy. 







te5e 



ALUMNI 
NEWS 



AUGUST 
1939 



O 



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O »"-• 
Q> O 





T 

R 
P 

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E 



Joe Murphy scoring touchdown against Washington and Lee at the Baltimore Stadium fast Thanksgiving Day 

in the game the Terps won, 19 to 13. Rip Hewitt threw the pass. 

Follow the xJViaryland terrapins . 

FOOTBALL SCHEDULE, 1939 

SEPTEMBER 30— HAMPDEN - SIDNEY COLLEGE PARK 

General Admission, $1.10 

OCTOBER 7— WESTERN MARYLAND BALTIMORE 

Reserved Seats, $1.65 and $1.10 

OCTOBER 14— VIRGINIA CHARLOTTESVILLE 

OCTOBER 21— RUTGERS NEW BRUNSWICK 



« 



OCTOBER 28— FLORIDA 



HOMECOMING 

Reserved Seats, $1.65 and $1.10 



COLLEGE PARK 



NOVEMBER 4— PENN STATE STATE COLLEGE 

NOVEMBER 11— GEORGETOWN WASHINGTON 

NOVEMBER 18 V. M. I. NORFOLK 

NOVEMBER 25— SYRACUSE COLLEGE PARK 

Reserved Seats, $1.65 and $1.10 

NOVEMBER 30— WASHINGTON AND LEE BALTIMORE 

Reserved Seats, $1.65 and $1.10 

Prices include any taxes in all instances. All games will be played at 2:30 P. M., except Georgetown and 
Syracuse, and they will be played at 2 o'clock. The time of the Washington and Lee game on Thanks- 
giving Day will be announced later. 

Applications for advanced reservations should be made to the Athletic Office, University of Maryland, 
College Park, Md. Telephone, Greenwood 3670. Add fifteen cents to any order if you desire your tickets sent 
by registered mail. 



JL 

5" 





Volume XI 



MARYLAND ALUMNI NEWS, AUGUST, 1939 



Number 



Alumni Association — University of Maryland 

Founded in 1892 



OFFICERS FOR 1939-40 

Charles W. Sylvester, '08, President 
Baltimore, Md. 

P. W. Chichester, '20, First Vice-President Frederick, Md. 

H. W. Burnside, '04, Second Vice-President Washington, D. C. 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Secretary-Treasurer College Park, Md. 

ALUMNI BOARD 
(Note — The officers named above are also members of the Alumni Board) 

J. Donald Kieffer, '30 Arts and Sciences 

Charles V. Koons, '29 Engineering 

R. R. Lewis, '19 Education 

John A. Silkman, '35 Agriculture 

Ruth Miles, '31 Home Economics 

Norwood Sothoron, '34 Commerce 

MEMBERS AT LARGE 

E. E. Powell, '13; Philip Wertheimer, '29 Men's Representatives 

Mary York Gadd, '28; Gertrude Chesnut, '27 Women's Representatives 

C. Walter Cole, '21 Immediate Past President 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Editor 

Maryland Alumni News, issued monthly by the University of Maryland Alumni Associa- 
tion at College Park, Md., as second-class matter under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Annual Alumni Association dues are $2.00. One year's subscription to Alumni News, 
50 cents. 

GROUP LEADERS 

ALLEGANY COUNTY: E. Brooke Whitting, '98, President; Dr. Joseph Franklin, '21, Secretary, 
Cumberland, Md. 

BALTIMORE COUNTY: C. Walter Cole, "21, President; H. B. Derrick, 17, Secretary, Towson, 
Maryland. 

BALTIMORE CITY: Chester Tawney. '31, President, 4022 Roland Avenue; E. Gordon Ham- 
mond, '34. Secretary, 1023 W. Barre Street, Baltimore, Md. 

CAROLINE COUNTY: George W. Clendaniel, '20, President; Dr. Maurice A. Brackett, '21, 
Treasurer; Mrs. George W. Clendaniel. '21, Secretary, all of Denton. Md. 

HARFORD COUNTY: W. B. Munnikhuysen, '14, President; H. M. Carroll, '20, Secretary. 
Bel Air. Md. 

FREDERICK COUNTY: J. Homer Remsberg, '18, President; Henry R. Shoemaker, '17, Sec- 
retary, Frederick, Md. 

MONTGOMERY COUNTY: Lawrence G. Smoot, '18, President. Kensington, Md.; Mary Fisher, 
'36, Secretary, Rockville, Md. 

NEW YORK CITY: Donald Kieffer, '30. President, 195 Broadway; Sarah Morris, '25, Secretary. 
310 East 44th Street, New York City. 

PHILADELPHIA: A. Moulton McNutt, '06, President, 413 Cooper Street, Camden, N. J.; J. P. 
Mudd, '07, Secretary. 174 Manheim Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

PITTSBURGH: E. Minor Wenner, '27, President, 1111 Gladys Avenue; Dr. A. A. Krieger, '32, 
Secretary Highland Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

WASHINGTON, D. C: J. Douglas Wallop. '19, President. 6139 N. Dakota Avenue, N.W.; 
Charles V. Koons. '29, Secretary, 419 Fourth Street, N.E., Washington. 

WASHINGTON COUNTY: Hon. Henry Holzapfel, Jr., '93, President, Hagerstown, Md.; L. G. 
Mathias, '23, Secretary, Hagerstown, Md. 

"M" CLUB OFFICERS AND BOARD MEMBERS 



Donald H. Adams, 


'28... 


President 


Dr. E. N. Cory, '09 






Secretary-Treas. 


A. K. Besley, '23 




. . . . Vice-President 


W. R. Maslin, '09 






Historian 






REPRESENTATIVES 








G. F. Pollock, '23 




Baseball 


James Busick, '35 . 






Tennis 


H. B. Shipley, '14 




Basketball 


Charles Remsberg, 


76 




. .Cross Country 


Stewart McCaw, 


'35 ... . 


Boxing 


W. C Supplee, '26. 






Football 


James Stevens, '19 




Lacrosse 


Dr. E. B. Friedenwald 


'03 


>... . At Large 


Lewis W. Thomas, 


28 


Track 


Dr. A. W. Valentine, 


"04 



Cover Picture 

It will be easier from now on to tell the 
time of day on the "Campus on the Hill." 
From the tower of the Arts and Science 
Building will come the well-known musi- 
cal tones of the Westminster Chimes 
striking the hour of dav. The chimes arc a 
gift of several classes, but were inspired by 
the class of 1938. 

Chairman of the committee to formu- 
late ways and means of procuring the 
chimes was Miss Eleanor Quirk, '38. 
President of her class was Robert Walton 
of Baltimore. President of the class of 
1939 was Joe Pitzer and with the help of 
manv co-workers the project now becomes 
a reality. 

The chimes will add much to the tra- 
ditions of the old campus, establishing a 
desire in the hearts of the former students 
to return to the campus and hear that 
which makes college days pleasant mem- 
ories. 

Alumni of Maryland 

The opening of the new school year is 
near at hand. While many of us cherish 
the traditions of Old Maryland we now 
have a new Mary- 
land, modern in ev- 
ery respect. It has 
grown larger each 
year, its standards 
are of the best and 
with its constantly 
expanding program of 
education it ranks 
high among the fi- 
nest Universities of 
America. 
As an Alumnus of this great institution, 
what arc vour plans for the year? We are 
counting on you to become one of the 
loyal workers and supporters if you are not 
already in that group. Take more interest 
in the affairs of the University. Attend its 
athletic events regularly. Become acquaint- 
ed with the members of the Faculty. Your 
presence on the campus a few times during 
(Continued on Page 10) 




Won Women's Citizenship Award Whos Who Amon s 

The Activ-es 




Helen ReindoUar, '39 

Miss Helen ReindoUar, '39, one of the outstanding members of the senior class, 
received the Citizenship Award which goes to the woman who, during her four years, 
tvpifies the model citizen and has done most for the University. 

Helen was the women's editor of The Dianiondback and was active in many extra- 
curricular activities. She was President of the Women's League and a member of the 
Calvert Debate Club. Helen is a member of Kappa Kappa Gamma and Pi Delta Epsilon, 
an honorary journalistic fraternity. She is a resident of Baltimore. 



Buckey, '26, Taught 
In Summer School 

Miss Nellie Buckey, '26, a member of 
the faculty at Buffalo Teachers College, 
was a special teacher in the University's 
Summer Session of 1939. Nellie is a mem- 
ber of Kappa Delta and was formerly with 
the Teachers College of Columbia Univer- 
sity. She has had numerous trips abroad 
in arranging tour courses for those special- 
izing in Home Economics. 

Nellie has taught in Michigan, North 
Carolina. New York and Maryland. She 
is a specialist in Home Economies. 



Married — Miss Virginia Long, '40, of 
Selbvville, Delaware, and a prominent 
member of the University Student Band, 
has married Mr. William A. Law, a grad 
of Temple University. They are now liv- 
ing at West Lawn, Pennsylvania. 



J. G. O'Connor, '12, 

Knows Foreign Service 

Manager of the foreign service depart- 
ment of the Standard Oil of New Jersey 
is J. G. O'Conor, '12. He is the older 
brother of His Excellency Herbert R. 
O'Conor, '20, who is Governor of Marx- 
land. Mr. O'Conor's travels have carried 
him to many parts of the world, but he 
found time this spring to stop by and 
watch his Alma Mater in a game of la- 
crosse. 

His duties have kept him away so much 
in the fall that he has missed the football 
games but he hopes for better luck this 
year. His New York address is 26 Broad- 
way. 

East Again — Mrs. C. T. Thomason 
(nee Catherine Dennison, '34), returns 
from California, where she has been visit- 
ing. 



J. A. Anderson. '04. 1539 Spencer Avenue 
Wilmette. 111.; Executive, National Rail- 
road Adjustment Board. 

Benj. L. Barnes, '23, Princess Anne. Md. 
Clerk of the Court for Somerset County 

F. W. Besley, '92, 303 Wendover Road. Bal 
timore, Md.; State Forester. 

Kirk Besley, '23, Hyattsville, Md.; Bacteriol 
ogist. United States Department of Ag 
riculture. 

J. J. Betton, '99. Washington. D. C; Inst- 
ance Underwriter. 

Billie Bland, '21, Sparks, Md.; Schoo 
Teacher. 

Chester Bletch. '19. Washington. D. C; Fiel 
Man of Maryland and Virginia Mill 
Producers' Association. 

Dr. F. B. Bomberger. '94. College Park, Md 
President. Baltimore Bank for Cooper 
atives. 

Reuben Brigham, '08, Ashton, Md.; Exten 
sion Administrator. United States De 
partment of Agriculture. 

D. E. Brown. '04. Upper Marlboro, Md.; Chie 

Scientific Aid. Tobacco Experimenta 
Farm. 
L. B. Broughton. '08. College Park, Md 
Dean. College of A. & S., University o 
Maryland. 

E. L. Browne, '22, 4808 24th Street, Nor! 

Arlington, Va. 
M. C. Brown. '19. 5504 Kemper Road, Balti 

more. Md. 
Miss Nellie Buckey. '25. Buffalo, N. Y.; Fac 

ulty. Buffalo Teachers College. 
Roger Burdette. '35, College Park, Md.; Ag 

ricultural Economics, University o 

Maryland. 
H. M. Burnside. '04. 3802 Ingomar Street 

N.W.. Washington. D. C; Vice-President 

Riggs National Bank. 
Charles W. Cairnes. '94. Ontario Apartments 

Washington, D. C; Retired Commandei 

United States Coast Guard. 
Barbara H. Caminita, '37, Washington, D. C. 

Laboratory Technician. 
J. W. Chambers. '99. 1151 16th Street, N.W 

Washington, D. C; Coal Merchant. 
Peter Chichester. '20. Frederick. Md.; Sale 

Manager, Dietrick & Gamble, Frederick 

Md. 
C. Wilbur Cissel. '32, College of Commerce 

University of Maryland; Teaching, Uni 

versity of Maryland. 
George Clendaniel, '20. Denton. Md.; Count} 

Agent, Caroline County. 
W. W. Cobey, '30, College Park. Md.; Cash 

ier, University of Maryland. 
Wm. H. Cockerill, '30. Purcellville, Va.; Agri- 
cultural County Agent in Virginia. 
C. Walter Cole. '21, Towson, Md.; Attorney 

at Law. 
W. P. Cole, Jr., '10, Towson, Md.; Marylan- 

Representative in Congress. 
E. N. Cory. '09, College Park. Md.; Sta 

Entomologist. 
H. M. Coster, '09, Indian Head, Md.; Chemist.] 
George B. Darcy, '24, College Park, Md.; 

Auto Salesman, Lustine Nichols, Hyattsn 

ville, Md. 
Malcolm Davis, '22, 904 11th Street. S.E.J 

Washington, D. C; United States NaJ 

tional Zoological Park. 
Mrs. Malcolm Davis, '23, 904 11th Street, S.E.J 

Washington, D. C; Keeping the Home 

Fires Burning. 
Austin Diggs, '21, Baltimore, Md.; Financial! 

Advisor with Auchincloss, Parker & 

Redpath. 

Maryland Alumni News 



Senator Tydings, '10, Receives Boom For | Presidency 



Sponsored by the Calvert Club of Bal- 
timore. Senator Millard E. Tydings, '10, 
is being boomed for the Democratic Pres- 
idential nomination in 1940. Senator Tyd- 
ings was consulted by the officers of the 
Club before the campaign was formally 
launched and gave his consent. The Sen- 
ator expressed gratification and apprecia- 
tion for the interest of the Club in his 
behalf. 

The Calvert Club took an active part 
in the Senator's recent campaign for re- 
election to the Senate, which was won by 
an overwhelming majority. 

The Calvert Club is composed of Bal- 
timore Democrats, many of whom are 
Maryland graduates, which makes it all the 
more evident that we all have particular 
interest in the progress of our eminent 
Alumnus. 

Senator Tydings began his political ca- 
reer in Harford County and by leaps and 
bounds went through the State Legisla- 
ture. He was Speaker of the House, then 
entered the United States Congress and in 




Senator Millard E. Tydings, 



192" he was elected United States Senator 
from Maryland. 

The Senator had his toughest political 
struggle in the 1938 primary when he was 
opposed by Mr. David J. Lewis, a Presi- 
dential sponsored candidate, but Senator 
Tydings came through with colors flying 



for the Free State of Maryland. To the 

best of our records, he is the second Alum 
nus to be sponsored for the Presidential 
nomination. The late Albert C. Ritchie, 
former Governor of Maryland, was the 
other Alumnus. 

Senator Tydings is classed among the 
conservatives and one who lias openly op- 
posed some New Deal projects. He is a 
World War veteran and has several dec- 
orations for gallantry in the line of duty. 
He is a native of Maryland, born and raised 
in Harford County and continues to re- 
side there. He finished at the College Park 
Schools of the University in 1910, and 
then took a Law course, receiving his de- 
gree and admission to the Bar in 1913. 

Chester W. Tawney, a member of the 
Calvert Club should be contacted if any 
Alumnus desires posters, stickers, etc. His 
address is Northwood Apartments, Balti- 
more, Maryland. 

Editor's Note — I am sure The News 
expresses the thoughts of every Alumnus 
when we say the "Best of Success, Fellow 
Alumnus. We are for you." 



Clarence A. Eck, '39. Overlea. Md.; Florist. 

Geary Eppley. '20, College Park, Md.; Di- 
rector of Athletics, University of Mary- 
land. 
.Mrs. Geary Eppley, '25. College Park, Md.; 
Director of the Director's Home. 

John Eiseman, '21, Chevy Chase, Md.; Na- 
tional Bureau of Standards. 

Herman Epstein. '29, 1016 St. Paul Street, 
Baltimore, Md.; Director of Physical 
Education at Baltimore City College. 

Edwin Filbert, '22. Baltimore. Md.; Pottery 
Manufacturing. 

Aaron Friedenwald. '29, 15 E. Fayette Street, 
Baltimore. Md.; Insurance Underwriter. 

J. J. T. Graham, '06, Bowie, Md.; Vice-Pres- 
ident. Lanham-Severn Road Corpora- 
tion of Maryland. 

John B. Gray, Jr., '14. Prince Frederick, Md.; 
Attorney at Law. 

William Gray, '00. O wings Mills, Md.; Feed 
Business. 

Mrs. Grace Coe Hale. '25, Bloomfield. N. J.; 
Keeping the Home. 

Bettie Harcum. '38. 606 Park Avenue, Salis- 
bury, Md.; Physician's Secretary, Salis- 
bury. 

Williard M. Hillegeist, '12, University of 
Maryland; Director of Admissions, Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 

Frank Hoffecher. '14. Sparrows Point, Md.; 
Mechanical Director. Bethlehem Steel. 

Austin S. Horman. '38. 118 Collins Avenue. 
Baltimore. Md. 

H. B. Hoshall, '08, College Park. Md.; Assist- 
ant Professor of Mechnical Engineering. 

T. D. Jarrell, '09. 23 Ralston Avenue. Hyatts- 
ville. Md.; Chemist, United States De- 
partment of Agriculture. 

Dr. Harry J. Kefauver, '00, Frederick, Md.; 



Practicing Physician. 

Dr. W. B. Kemp. '12. College Park, Md.; 
Professor of Statistics, University of 
Maryland. 

C. V. Koons, '29, Washington, D. C; Attor- 
ney at Law, Member of Alumni Board. 

J. Miles Lankford, '24, Pocomoke City, Md.; 
Eastern Shore Politician. 

Munroe Leaf, '27, New York City, N. Y.; 
Author, Stokes Publishing Co., New 
York. 

Ransom R. Lewis, Jr.. '19. Frederick, Md.; 
Farming in Frederick County, Member 
of Alumni Board. 

Edwin Long. Jr., '38. Westover. Md. 

Urah W. Long, '08, Selbysville, Delaware. 

George J. Luckey, '24, Washington, D. C. 

George F. Madigan, '30, 201 Washington 
Avenue. Laurel Md.; Instructor, Soil 
Technology. 

William F. Mansfield. '34. 1656 U Street, S.E., 
Washington, D. C; With Transient Bu- 
reau, Cumberland, Md. 

William Maslin. '09, Port Chester, N. Y. 

R. H. Miller, '24, Spencerville, Md.; Farmer. 

W. R. Mitchell. '04, Virginia Blake, Va.; 
Crane Distributing Co. 

Thomas B. Mullendore, '04, 880 Lafayette 
Avenue. Buffalo, N. Y. 

E. I. Oswald, '08. College Park, Md.; Pro- 
fessor of Extension. 

Steward McCaw, '35, University of Mary- 
land; Instructor in Physical Education, 
University of Maryland. 

Austin A. McBride, '23. 310 17th Street, 
Huntingdon, Pa.; Teaching Vocational 
Agriculture in High School at Towanda. 

Charles G. Paine, '19, 2331 Cathedral Ave- 
nue, N.W., Washington, D. C; Lawyer. 

R. M. Pindell, '89, Philadelphia, Pa.; Leather 



Business. 

Walter Plumley, '29, Haddon Heights, N. J.; 
Minister. 

Alma Preinkert, '23. 1436 Chapin Street. 
N.W,. Washington, D. C; Registrar at 
University of Maryland. 

Louise Reinohl. '34, 427 Calvert Street, Hy- 
attsville, Md.; Secretary, Beltsville. 
United States Department of Agriculture. 

Charles K. Rittenhouse. '35, 503 Chapel Gate 
Lane, Baltimore, Md. 

R. G. Rothgeb, '24, Takoma Park, Md.; As- 
sociate Professor, Plant Breeding, Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 

E. C. E. Ruppert. '20, Washington, D. C; 
Sales Director. Westinghouse, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

George Sachs, '36, Washington, D. C. 

E. R. Sasscer, '04, United States Department 
of Agriculture. Washington, D. C; Pres- 
ident, American Association Economic 
Entomology. 

R. Lee Sellman, '19. College Park, Md.; In- 
surance Underwriter. 

Richard L. Silvester. '08, 3140 Klingle Road, 
Washington, D. C; Practicing Physician. 

Frederick K. Slanker, 21, 1725 17th Street, 
N.W., Washington. D. C; Special At- 
torney. United States State Department. 

W. W. Skinner. '95. 6 Knowles Avenue, Ken- 
sington. Md.; Associate Director, Bureau 
of Chemistry, United States Department 
of Agriculture. 

E. Nelson Snouffer. '29. 10 Beechwood Road, 
College Park, Md.; Building Supplies. 

Ruth Somerville, '37. Cumberland, Md.; Red 
Cross Director in New Jersey. 

W. A. S. Somerville, '08, 106 Altamont Ter- 
race, Cumberland, Md.; Coal Business. 
(Continued on Page 6) 



August, 1939 



Woolford, '89, Builder 

Of Large Public Service 



Just before the turn of the present cen- 
tury, Messrs. Cator and Guv Woolford, 
brothel s, started a credit reporting agency 
( for retail merchants and department 
stoics) now known as the Retail Credit 
Company of Atlanta, Georgia. They were 
— as the passing years have clearly demon 
strated — voung men of integrity, ability, 
enthusiasm and vision. They were hard 
workers, too. and the business grew. One 
day, while soliciting a life insurance agen- 
cy for credit reports on life insurance ap- 
plicants who wanted to give notes for 
premiums, thev learned that one life in- 
surance company was making its own "in- 
spection reports" (data regarding char- 
acter, habits, and health history) on life 
insurance applicants. Inquiry then showed 
that other companies were endeavoring 
to obtain such reports, and that many com- 
panies felt the need for that type of in- 
formation. Although the information re- 
quired in such instances was considerably 
different from that necessary in strictly 
retail credit reporting, the young and small 
organization began serving in this field. 
At first, the service was limited to At- 
lanta and its vicinity, but very soon, largely 
at the request of the life insurance com- 
panies who were using the service, the 
company began extending its facilities. 
Thus was born what is now an interna- 
tional reporting agency serving many kinds 
of insurance and commercial organiza- 
tions. 

Mr. Cator Woolford proved to be quite 
gifted in matters of organization, sales, 
and personnel — selecting, training, and de- 
veloping men. Mr. W'oolford's ability with 
men goes back to his college days when 
he was top sergeant of a cadet company 
which won second place in the National 
Encampment and Drill held in Washing- 
ton, D. C, in 1887. In this company was 
the Honorable Melvin C. Hazen, now 
Commissioner of the District of Colum- 
bia, also Dr. L. B. Johnson of Morganza, 
Maryland, a classmate of Mr. Hazen. 

Mr. Guy Woolford was particularly tal- 
ented along the line of efficient and scien- 
tific office operations. The business pro- 
gressed and the facilities were expanded 





Guy Woolford, '89 

gradually on a conservative financial basis. 
No outside capital was used and the com- 
pany is still a closed corporation; the stock 
is owned bv officers and a large number 
of key employees. 

There are branch offices throughout the 
United States and Canada and in a few- 
foreign countries. The full-time personnel 
numbers more than 2,000. In addition 
there are part time representatives in prac- 
tically every community in North Amer- 
ica and in the principal cities of most for- 
eign countries. 

The Retail Credit Company gathers and 
furnishes information on people for busi- 
ness purposes — such information being 
used bv customers, mainly in connection 
with insurance and long-term credit trans- 
actions. Customers include practically all 
the life, fire, and casualty insurance com- 
panies in the United States and Canada; 
also a large number of manufacturers, dis- 
tributors, and finance companies who oper- 
ate nationally or sectionallv. 



Married — Sam Bogley, '36, Theta Chi, 
married Miss Anita Clark in June, 1939. 
The newlyweds live at 307 McKinley St., 
N.W., Washington, D. C. Which, inci- 
dentally, is next door to Mr. and Mrs. 
Edward E. Quinn, '36. Mrs. Ouinn was 
formerly Miss Louise Fenton. 



Who s Who Among 
The Actives 



Norwood Sothoron. '34, 2805 27th Street, 
N.W., Washington. D. C.J Promotional 
Salesman of Quaker Oats. 

Stanley Stabler. '29. Spencerville. Md.; Su- 
perintendent of Farms. University of 
Maryland. 

James W. Stevens, '19. 226 S. Charles Street. 
Baltimore. Md.; Produce Broker, Bal- 
timore. 

Frank G. Stewart, '12, 1800 14th Street, N.W.. 
Washington, D. C; With Standard Auto 
Supply Co., Washington, D. C. 

W. C. Supplee, '26, Laurel. Md.; Assistant 
Professor of Chemistry, University of 
Maryland. 

Charles W. Sylvester, '08, 2811 Mt. Holly 
Street, Baltimore. Md.; Vocational Ed- 
ucational Director, Baltimore. 

T. B. Symons, '02, College Park, Md.; Di- 
rector of Extension, University of Mary- 
land. 

L. W. Thomas, '28, Washington. D. C; Lines 
Department. C. & P. Telephone Co. 

R. V. Truitt, '14, College Park, Md.; Di- 
rector Chesapeake Biological Laboratory. 

F. P. Veitch, '91, College Park, Md.; Bureau 
of Chemistry, United States Department 
of Agriculture. 

F. P. Veitch, Jr., '31, College Park, Md.; 
Chemist, National Canners Association, 
Research Laboratory, Washington, D. C. 

J. Douglass Wallop, '19, 6138 North Dakota 
Avenue, N.W., Washington, D. C; In- 
surance and Bonding Business, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

H. R. Walls, '18, University of Maryland; 
Chemist, State Inspection Service. 

C. A. Warthen, '08, 3219 17th Street, Wash- 
ington, D. C; Engineering. 

Harry D. Watts, '04, 230 Park Avenue, N. Y.; 
Vice-President, James Stewart Con- 
struction Co., New York. 

George S. Wentworth, '04, Central Avenue, 
New York. 

Charles White, '23, College Park, Md.; Pro- 
fessor of Inorganic Chemistry. 

E. P. Williams, '14, College Park, Md.; 
Laundry Manager. 

Albert Woods, '33, College Park, Md.; As- 
sistant Professor of Agronomy. 

Leland Worthington, '25. Berwyn, Md.; In- 
structor in History. 

E. F. Zalesak, '25, College Park, Md.; Pro- 
prietor, Varsity Grill, College Park. 



Dr. Lewis Allen, M. D., '96, 
Physician And Horseman 

'Tis a good doctor who has gained a 
reputation in the medical world, but to 
gain also national prominence in another 
profession is for an eminent Alumnus 
such as Dr. Lewis Allen, '96, of Northern 
Virginia. Not only is he a prominent phy- 
sician in obstetrics, but he has carried on 
the traditions of Virginia as the land of 
thoroughbred horses. , 

(Continued on Page 7) 



Maryland Alumni News 



RESIGNS 



APPOINTED 




Dr. Arthur M. Shipley, '02 

In recognition of his twenty-eight rears 
of service to the Citv Hospitals of Balti- 
more, Dr. Arthur M. Shipley, '02, was 
tendered a testimonial dinner bv members 
of the hospital and medical staffs. Dr. 
Shipley had recently rendered his resig- 
nation as Surgeon-in-Chief of Staff and in 
doing so had said, "For the good of the 
service and a younger man is needed." 

Dr. Shipley, however, retains his posi- 
tion as Professor of Surgery at the Uni- 
versity Medical School. 

His successor as Surgeon in-Chief of 
Staff for the City Hospitals is Dr. Thomas 
B. Aycock, '24. a prominent young sur- 
geon of Baltimore. 

Began In 1911 

Dr. Shipley began his services with the 
Baltimore City Hospitals in 1911 and 
through his accomplishment in the sur- 



Dr. Shipley, '02, 

Resigns; 

Dr. Aycock, *24, 
Successor 



gical profession attained the position of 
Chief of Surgical Service. He now has 
been made Chief Consulting Surgeon and 
chairman of the Medical Advisory Board. 
His achievements in the surgical field 
have been acclaimed far and wide. He en- 
tered the Medical Corps in the World 
War as a Captain, later attaining the rank 
of Major. He was the guest speaker at the 
meeting of the North Pacific Surgical As- 
sociation in Spokane, Washington, in 

1938. He also presented a post-graduate 
course at the meeting of American Col- 
lege of Surgeons held in Baltimore in 

1939, and the Medical Association of 
North America. Recently he was elected 
to the Surgical Society of America. 

Member of Fourth Regiment 
His successor, Dr. Aycock, is having suc- 
cess come his way. He has been connected 
with the Medical School of the Univer- 
sity since 1927 when he began as an as- 




Dr. T. B. Aycock. '24 

sistant in Surgery and instructor in Anat- 
omy. Today he is Clinical Professor of 
Surgery. Dr. Aycock became a member of 
the City Hospitals Staff as visiting surgeon 
in 1931 and by his splendid services in 
surgery he received the appointment as 
Surgeon-in-Chief of Staff. He is a mem- 
ber of the Fourth Medical Regiment with 
the rank of Major. His interest in the Med- 
ical Alumni Association has been constant. 
Since graduation he has served on the 
board and as secretary of the Association. 
In July this year Dr. Aycock was in- 
vited to present a paper before the Amer- 
ican Medical Association meeting held in 
San Francisco. Mrs. Aycock accompanied 
him on this trip across the country. Fol- 
lowing the meeting Mr. and Mrs. Aycock 
toured the Pacific Coast, returning bv way 
of Canada. 



Dr. Lewis Allen, M. D., '96 

Dr. Allen was born near Bern-ville in 
1874. Attended the University of Vir- 
ginia and later the University of Mary- 
land Medical School, from which he grad- 
uated in 1896. His mother, Mrs. Robert 
Omen Allen, the former Miss Edith How- 
ard, died in child-birth and so it was not 
only the search of a profession that led 
Dr. Allen to become a specialist in obstet- 
rics. Following graduation he studied in 
Berlin, Vienna, Dresden, Munich and 



Lcipsic. Afterwards he was an associate 
professor of obstetrics at the University's 
Medical School until 1910. 

He returned to Berryville and began his 
medical career, which has done so much 
for Northern Virginia. At Blue Ridge 
Summit in Pennsylvania he was the at- 
tending physician at the birth of Wallis 
Warficld, the present Duchess of Wind 
sor. 

Thoroughbreds His Hobby 

But perhaps Dr. Lew, as he is famil- 
iarly called, is as well known in equine 



circles. He inherited a natural love for 
horses. His father was a cavalry leader and 
his brother was a prominent horseman. 

Dr. Lew has successfully carried on the 
traditions of thoroughbred breeding which 
was started by his great-grandfather, Da- 
vid Hume Allen, in 1810. 

Not only has he upheld a century old 
tradition but at the same time has done 
more for Northern Virginia, than any 
other man through his practice of obstet- 
rics. 

(Notes taken from The Senator.) 



August, 1939 




Mr. and Airs. Burleigh in upper left and snapshots from their trip. 

'Petcy", ex. '29, is a member ot Alpha Omicron Pi, and is the former Anita 
Peters. Bill Burleigh, '28, is a Sigma Phi Sigma. 



The Lure of the East 



The Queen Mary leaves her berth with- 
out the tugboats which have always as- 
sisted before. It is some moments before 
the large ship swings around, just clearing 
the Italian Line pier and the Cunard Line 
platform, on which our friends are waving 
us farewell and bon voyage. Captain Irv- 
ing's spectacular feat of taking the Queen 
Mary out under her own power will surely 
break the tugboat strike! 

Farewell to New York, as the skyline 
fades in the distance — farewell to America, 
as we pass Miss Liberty! 
London 

We are bound for London — the Lon- 
don of fond memories, and of quaint St. 
Ethelburga's, the only Church to have 
withstood the London fire and the one in 
which we were married onlv a year ago. 
But London looks changed — her lovely 
green parks are scarred with bomb-proof 



BY ANITA PETERS BURLEIGH, '29 

shelters, and her people are grimlv deter- 
mined to face war if it should come. Our 
friends show us where anti-aircraft guns 
have been stationed on the apartment- 
house roof, and the small gas masks with 
which their children have been fitted. The 
old peace and repose still linger at Wind- 
sor Castle, Stratford-on-Avon, and Hamp- 
ton Court, we are glad to find. 
Paris 
And now to Paris! We make the most 
of our time by taking in four night clubs 
the first night, and by exploring the gar- 
dens of Versailles to our heart's content 
the next day. How lovely the woods arc 
in their vivid fall coloring as we wander 
through them to come unexpectedly upon 
a statue, a fountain, or an exquisite am- 
phitheatre. And then we explore further 
by carriage when our feet begin to com- 
plain. 



But we arc anxious to return to Italy — 
the scene of our honevmoon. We awake 
early in the morning to catch a glimpse 
from the window of the Simplon-Orient 
Express of our favorite spot in Switzer- 
land — lovely Montreux, set on the edge of 
the lake with the towering Alps above, 
and projecting out into the lake the me- 
dieval Chateau d'Chillon, wherein Bonni- 
vard, as immortalized by Bvron, was im- 
prisoned. 

Venice 

As we hurry on to Venice we enjov the 
high Italian Alps and pass inviting lakes. 
To see St. Mark's again at sunset, to pass 
in our gondola at midnight and hear en- 
chanting voices floating down to us from 
the bridge overhead — this is Venice as it 
is and has always been! 

Leaving Venice, we sail down the blue 
Adriatic, which becomes grev and less 
friendly as we approach Crete. We are 
told that the moon's total eclipse, which 
wc watch from the sun-deck, may be re- 
sponsible for our rough seas. However, 
not even now do we spoil our perfect rep- 
utation as sailors! 

Egypt 

The African coast emerges from the dis- 
tant haze as our cruise across the Mediter- 
ranean nears an end. Fascinating Egvpt and 
the East — what thoughts of the Arabian 
Nights and the Magic Carpet come back 
to us! And, indeed, this seems a make- 
believe world with its turbaned peoples, 
it conglomeration of tongues and colors. 
We must see evervthing — the intriguing 
shops in the Souks (or bazaars), the na- 
tive quarters, the beautiful mosques with 
their priceless mosaics and prayer rugs and 
their romantic minarets. The Pyramids and 
Sphinx under the full moon, the Royal 
Tombs, the camels, the white sails on the 
Nile, these all appear to us as in a dream. 
We meet friends in Cairo with whom we 
had celebrated New Year's in Rome the 
previous year, and this helps to orient us 
as to reality. 

Arabia 

And then from Suez we embark upon 
the bluest of waters we have ever seen — 
the Red Sea. We pass the Sinai Penin- 
sula on our left, and recall that this is 
where Moses and the people of Israel 
wandered for fort}' years in the Wilder- 
ness. 

(Continued on Page 10) 



Maryland Alumni News 



Old Line Athletic Contributions 



By W. H. ("Bill") HOTTEL: 



Football Squad Of 50 
Gathers September 5 

Maryland will start football practice on 
Tuesday, September 5, with a squad of 
approximately 50 aspirants that will include 
17 letter men. The others will come from 
the 193S frosh and the junior varsity of 
last fall. 

Coach Frank Dobson, who will return 
from his vacation about September 1. 
again will have Jack Faber and Al Heagv, 
two Maryland grads. as his aides, with Al 
Woods, another former Terp athlete, as 
freshman mentor. 

Mankind has above average material as 
far as Terp griddcrs go, but will be oxer- 
matched in manpower bv every team it 
will meet, with the exception of Hamp- 
dcn-Sidney, which will be played in the 
opener at College Park September 30. 
17 Letter Men Return 

Most of Maryland's regulars doubtless 
will come from the following 1" letter 
men: 

Ends — Francis Beamer, Frank Dwyer, 
Leo Mueller and Dick Shaffer, the last a 
reserve halfback last year. 

Tackles — Bob Brown, Ralph Albara- 
no. Bill Krouse, Bob Cochrane and Frank 
Blazek. who has been shifted from end. 

Guards — George Lawrence and Ed- 
ward Llovd. 

Center — Bob Smith. 

Backs — Joe Murphv, Frank Skotnicki. 
John Boyda, Bob Brand, and Fred Wide- 
ner. 

George Gienger, guard, out most of 1938 
with an injury; Pershing Mondorff. shelved 
early last fall with an appendectomy; Mil- 
ton Lumsden, back, and Frank I lever, 
guard, who won their way up from the 
jayvees; and Merle DuVall, quarterback; 
John Cordyack, back; Ralph Burlin, guard, 
and Jim Wharton, center, from 1st year's 
fall frosh. also will furnish some of the 
regulars and first-string reserves. 

Mondorff, who won his letter in 1937; 
Gienger and DuVall, and possibly Lums- 
den. figure to be regulars or near-regulars. 
(Continued on Page 10) 



MARYLAND'S PROSPECTIVE 1939 GRID SQUAD 



(FROM 1938 VARSITY SQUAD) 













Yrs.on 






Name 


Pos. 


Ht. 


Wt. 


Age 


Squad 


High School 


Home 


*Francis Beamer 


End 


6-2i 2 


183 


22 


3 


Roosevelt 


Washington. D. C 


*Leo Mueller 


End 


5-11 


175 


21 


2 


Balto. City Coll. 


Baltimore. Md. 


* Frank Dwyer 


End 


6-2 


174 


22 


2 


Forest Park 


Baltimore, Md. 


*Riehard Shaffer 


End 


6-3 


175 


20 


2 


Ferndale 


Denton. Md. 


* Frank Blazek 


End 


6-1 


190 


20 


2 


Poly 


Baltimore, Md. 


* Robert Brown 


Tackle 


6-1 


216 


21 


3 


W. Hazelton 


W. Hazleton, Pa. 


* Ralph Albarano 


Tackle 


6 


198 


24 


3 


Lilly 


Lilly. Pa. 


* Robert Cochrane 


Tackle 


6 


202 


21 


2 


Forest Park 


Baltimore. Md. 


*Bill Krouse 


Tackle 


6-2 


233 


22 


2 


Western 


Bethesda, Ma. 


*Elmer Bright 


Tackle 


5-11 


200 


21 


2 


Poly 


Baltimore. Md. 


* George Lawrence 


Guard 


6-1 Vz 


184 


23 


3 


Fr. & Mar. Acad. 


Hanover, Pa. 


George Gienger 


Guard 


6 


201 


25 


2 


Scottsville 


Brentwood. Md. 


* Edward Lloyd 


Guard 


5-11 


179 


23 


3 


Western 


Washington, D. C 


* Robert Smith 


Center 


5-11 


185 


22 


2 


Tome 


Woodlynne. N. J. 


*Joe Murphy 


Back 


5-10 


151 


22 


2 


Tome 


Carney's Pt., N. J 


Pershing Mondorff Back 


5-11 


195 


21 


3 


Emmitsburg 


Emmitsburg, Md. 


*John Boyda 


Back 


6 


188 


23 


3 


Vocational 


Iselin, Pa. 


*Frank Skotnicki 


Back 


5-10 


168 


21 


3 


W. Hazleton 


W. Hazleton. Pa. 


''Robert Brand 


Back 


6-1 


168 


21 


3 


Eastern 


Washington. D. C 


*Fred Widener 


Back 


5-10 


165 


20 


2 


Balto. City Coll. 


Baltimore. Md. 



* 1938 Letter Men. 



(FROM 1938 JUNIOR VARSITY SQUAD) 













Yrs.on 






Name 


Pos. 


Ht. 


Wt. 


Age 


Squad 


High School 


Home 


Israel Leites 


End 


5-10 


171 


21 


2 


City College 


Baltimore. Md. 


Thornton Race 


End 


5-11 


166 


22 


2 


Rutherford 


Hagerstown, Md. 


Charles Morris 


End 


6-l' 2 


180 


23 


2 


Delmar 


Delmar. Md. 


Emery Sedlak 


Tackle 


6-1 


180 


21 


2 


Homestead 


College Park, Md 


John Morton 


Tackle 


5-10 


186 


19 


2 


Roxborough 


Mt. Airy, Md. 


Dent Abell 


Tackle 


6 


190 


20 


2 


Newman 


Leonardtown, Md 


Arthur Rudy 


Guard 


6 


197 


26 


3 


Middletown 


Middletown. Md. 


Paul McNeill 


Guard 


6 


180 


19 


2 


Kingston 


Baltimore. Md. 


Frank Heyer 


Guard 


5-11 


171 


19 


2 


McDonogh 


Baltimore. Md. 


Jack Mintzer 


Guard 


5-11 


170 


19 


2 


Ocean City 


Ocean City, N. J. 


Herman Knust 


Center 


5-11 


198 


21 


2 


Poly 


Baltimore, Md. 


Allen Minion 


Center 


6 


170 


20 


2 


Barringer 


Baltimore. Md. 


Vernon Miller 


Back 


5-10 


145 


20 


2 


Highland Springs 


Highl'd Sp'gs. Va 


Kenneth Hess 


Back 


5-11 


184 


23 


3 


Tech 


Washington. D. C 


Gabriel Fox 


Back 


5-10 


173 


24 


2 


Business 


Baltimore, Md. 


Milton Lumsden 


Back 


5-9 


165 


20 


2 


Poly 


Baltimore. Md. 


Jack Mueller 


Back 


6-1 


172 


21 


2 


Balto. City Coll. 


Baltimore, Md. 



(FROM 1938 FRESHMAN SQUAD) 











Yrs 


on 




Name 


Pos. 


Ht. 


Wt. 


Age Squad High School 


Home 


Charles Bowers 


End 


6-2 


202 


19 


Northside 


Corning, N. Y. 


Ashton Garrett 


End 


6-2 


184 


19 


Rich-Montgom. 


Rockville. Md. 


Robert Steele 


End 


6 


172 


19 


Collingdale 


Collingdale. Pa. 


Harry Pappas 


End 


5-lli 2 


161 


18 


Poly 


Baltimore, Md. 


Ralph Burlin 


Tackle 


6-1 


190 


21 


Tome 


P't Deposit, Md. 


John Hepburn 


Tackle 


5-9 


201 


19 


Devitt 


Brentwood, Md. 


Theodore Vial 


Tackle 


6-li 2 


172 


18 


Tech 


Riverdale. Md. 


Larry MacKenzie 


Guard 


6-1 


177 


19 


Forest Park 


Silver Spring. Md 


William Jack 


Guard 


5-10 


175 


18 


Tome 


P't Deposit. Md. 


Edwin Bader 


Center 


5- 10 1 2 


173 


19 


Ogden 


Chevy Chase. Md 


James W 7 harton 


Center 


6 


155 


21 


Forest Park 


Baltimore, Md. 


Jack Barrett 


Center 


6 


170 


19 


Salesianuim 


Wilmington. Del. 


Merle DuVall 


Back 


5-10 


169 


19 


Mt. St. Joe 


Baltimore. Md. 


Bernard Ulman 


Back 


6-1 


165 


21 


Forest Park 


Baltimore. Md. 


Elmer Rigby 


Back 


5-11 


165 


21 


Forest Park 


Baltimore. Md. 


Jack Warfield 


Back 


5-11 


155 


21 


Balto. City Coll. 


Baltimore. Md. 


James Dunn 


Back 


5-10 


160 


18 


Staunton M. A. 


Washington. D. C 


John Cordyack 


Back 


6 


167 


21 


Osceola Mills 


Baltimore. Md. 



August, 1939 



Grapevine News About Those We Know 



Married — From the ranks of bachelor- 
hood tumbles Omar D. Crothers, '29, and 
married Miss Margaret Jefferson of Ches- 
tertown, Md. The ceremonies took place 
on August 1 at St. Ann's Church at Mid- 
dletown, Delaware. Best man was Robert 
T. Settle, '30, a Sigma Nu and fraternity 
brother of the bridegroom, who is more 
familiarly known as "Gus." 

The newlyweds will reside in the De 
Soto Apartment, University Parkway, Bal- 
timore, Maryland. "Gus" is an attorney 
at law with offices in the Title Building, 
and also Safety Director of the WPA for 

Maryland. 

O 

Married — Rosella Gengnagel, '37, and 

Al Ireland, '37, are now Mr. and Mrs. 

Ireland of Rochelle, New York. Rosella 

is a member of Kappa Kappa Gamma and 

Al stayed with the Theta Chi boys. Al 

is employed by the McCormick Company 

of Baltimore. 

O 

Married — Harry T. Kelley, '34, has 
stepped off and married Miss Grace Dur- 
rett of Huntington, West Virginia. The 
ceremonies took place in Ville Platte, 
Louisiana, on July 14th. Harry is a civil 
engineer for the Fluhr Construction Corn- 
pain' of San Francisco. The address for the 
newlyweds will be General Delivery, Sea- 
graves, Texas. 

o 

Pathology — Charles Gibson Grey, '30 

now is a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine 

in the Pathology Department in the 

United States Department of Agriculture. 

Charley attended Michigan State when he 

got his D.V.M. in '34. He is a member 

of Alpha Gamma Rho and Phi Kappa 

Phi. He is married and lives in Colonial 

Village, Virginia. 

O 

Scholarship — Edith Brechbill, '36, A. 

O. Pi, has won a scholarship to Columbia's 
Teachers College in New York. Her cur- 
riculum will be the workshop in science. 



Motors — Ernest Eaton, '36, and a mem- 
ber of K. A., is with the General Motors 
Corporation in Baltimore, Maryland. 



Summer School — Ed Walters, '34, and 
Mrs. Walters attended Summer School. 
Ed now is teaching at the Cambridge High 
School. During the Summer Session Ed 
served as chairman of the Dance Program. 

Another Alumnus who served on the 
Summer School Social Program is Miss 
Ethel Enderlee, '38, who is now a teacher 
at Southern High School in Lothian, Mary- 
land. Ethel was chairman of the Musical 

Program. 

O 

Summer Theatres — Loretta Dolan, '37, 
a member of Kappa Delta and a former 
star of the Footlight Club, is playing with 
the Severn River Players at their Summer 
Theatre at Arnold, Maryland. 



Supervisors — Lee R. Pennington, '15, 
a former trackster of note and a World 
War veteran, with several citations, is a 
special financial supervisor in the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation. Another former 
Old Liner athlete, A. Courtney Havden, 
'31, of football note, is also a supervisor. 



The Lure of the East 

The sea is calm and we should like to 
sail longer on its sunny waters. We land 
in Holy Arabia, the scene of the pilgrim- 
ages to Mecca and Medina. Before us is 
a city of white buildings four and five 
stories in height, and purplish mountains 
rising beyond the white sandy beaches 
which are strewn with lovely shells and 
corals. We shall select some of these mol- 
lusks for the Smithsonian Institute, as 
that museum is anxious to have a com- 
plete collection from the Red Sea. We arc 
shown Eve's tomb, where the two hun- 
dred foot lady is said to have been buried. 
We have the rare opportunity of crossing 
by caravan to the Persian Gulf, stopping 
enroute at King Ibn Saud's Palace in 
Riyadh and later in his hunting encamp- 
ment outside the city, where we are gra- 
ciously granted an audience with His Maj- 
esty. 

(Continued Next Issue) 



Alumni of Maryland 

the year will give much encouragement 
to the officials of Maryland. 

You can do much to encourage out- 
standing high school graduates from your 
community to attend the University of 
Maryland. Make it your business to know 
the local school officials, aid them in their 
guidance programs and assist in building 
a better local educational program. This 
will aid education generally. If in business 
where you use new employees with Uni- 
versity training, give the Maryland grad- 
uates a chance. 

Membership in the Alumni Association 
costs only $2.00 per year. You cannot af- 
ford not to belong. Help us build a larger, 
stronger and better Association. Take pride 
in your Alma Mater. Boost and continue 
to boost. 

Sincerely yours, 
CHARLES W. SYLVESTER, 

President. 

Football Squad Of 50 
Gathers September 5 

Dates May Be Changed 

Maryland, like other schools, has been 
given a problem in the change of Thanks- 
giving Day. However, Washington and 
Lee, listed on November 30, may be shift- 
ed to December 2, and Syracuse, down 
for November 25, may be battled on the 
23rd. If these shifts are made, Maryland's 
schedule will be: 
Sept. 30 — Hampden-Sidney, at College 

Park. 
Oct. 7 — Western Maryland, in Baltimore 

Stadium. 
Oct. 14 — Virginia, at Charlottesville. 
Oct. 21 — Rutgers, at New Brunswick. 
Oct. 28— Florida, at College Park. 

(Homecoming.) 
Nov. 4 — Penn State, at State College. 
Nov. 11 — Georgetown, at Griffith Sta- 
dium, Washington. 
Nov. 18— V. M. I., at Norfolk, Va., Sta- 
dium. 
Nov. 23 — Syracuse, at College Park. 
Dec. 2 — Washington and Lee, at Balti- 
more Stadium. 



Farming — John "Ben" Cowgill, '33, is 
farming in Prince George's County. He is 
a member of Alpha Zeta and a graduate in 
Agriculture. 



10 



Maryland Alumr.i News 



MEMORIES OF FELLOWSHIP 




f f/e 



luiJerf/ctta/u 0<f»///((j 

ffji(/ So /(((va to /' id laremeff. 

Your Alumni Association endeavors to keep these memories alive. With your cooperation it 
can be done. Have you joined your fellow Alumni in contributing to the worthy cause? If not, 
here's your chance. Fill out and return this blank. 



CUT ON THIS LINE 



lie usual contribution is two dollars per year; 
this, fifty cents is for one vear's subscription 
iThe Alumni News. 



Name _ ..—Class Occupation, 



Address 



Married? To whom Children 

Business address Title 



r-, a it n ■ 






•« • 

"•■! 

B», 

is 



Bfti 




...everywhere you loolf 

i\l the beaches ... hero, there 
and everywhere it's Chesterfield . . . for 
Chesterfield is the cigarette that's good 
for more pleasure . . . Chesterfields are 
milder and better-tasting . . . more and 
more smokers know 



Copyright 1939, Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. 




ALUMNI 
NEWS 






SEPTEMBER 
D 1939 



>> 

u P. 

•° § 
►J o 




Homecoming, Saturday, October 28 
Florida vs. tJMaryland 




Sopbs Gloat 
As Frosh Float 



Reserves Romp 
Before Royal Pomp 



Lucky Tackle 
Tacky Luck 



Program Includes: Pep Rally — Tug-o'-war — Fro^h Football — Luncheon — "M" Club Meeting — Band 
Parade — Varsity Football — Float Parade — Alumni Mixer — Buffet Supper and Dance. DO NOT MISS IT! 
IN THE MEANTIME, Follow the Terps' Schedule As Follows: 

FOOTBALL SCHEDULE, 1939 

SEPTEMBER 30— HAMPDEN - SIDNEY COLLEGE PARK 

General Admission, $1.10 

OCTOBER 7— WESTERN MARYLAND {Night Game — 8 P. M.) - - - - BALTIMORE 

Reserved Seats, $1.65 and $1.10 

OCTOBER 14— VIRGINIA CHARLOTTESVILLE 

OCTOBER 21— RUTGERS NEW BRUNSWICK 



OCTOBER 28— FLORIDA 



HOMECOMING 

Reserved Seats, $1.65 and $1.10 



COLLEGE PARK 



NOVEMBER 4— PENN STATE STATE COLLEGE 

NOVEMBER 11— GEORGETOWN WASHINGTON 

NOVEMBER 18 V. M. I. NORFOLK 



NOVEMBER 23 SYRACUSE (Thanksgiving Day — 11 A. M.) - 

Reserved Seats, $1.65 and $1.10 



DECEMBER 2— WASHINGTON AND LEE 

Reserved Seats, $1.65 and $1.10 



COLLEGE PARK 
BALTIMORE 



Prices include any taxes in all instances. All games will be played at 2:30 P. M., except Georgetown, which will be played 
at 2 o'clock. The time of the Washington and Lee game will be announced later. 

Applications for advanced reservations should be made to the Athletic Office, University of Maryland, College Park, Md. 
Telephone, Greenwood 3670. Add fifteen cents to any order if you desire your tickets sent by registered mail. 



Volume XI 



MARYLAND ALUMNI NEWS. SEPTEMBER, 1939 



Number 4 



Alu 



mn 



Association — University of Maryland 

Founded in 1892 



OFFICERS FOR 1939 - 40 

Charles W. Sylvester, '08, President 
Baltimore, Md. 

P. W. Chichester, '20, First Vice-President Frederick, Md. 

H. W. Burnside, '04, Second Vice-President Washington, D. C. 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Secretary-Treasurer College Park, Md. 

ALUMNI BOARD 
(Note — The officers named above are also members of the Alumni Board) 

]. Donald Kieffer, '30 Arts and Sciences 

Charles V. Koons, '29 Engineering 

R. R. Lewis, '19 Education 

John A. Silkman, '35 Agriculture 

Ruth Miles, '31 Home Economics 

Norwood Sothoron, '34 Commerce 

MEMBERS AT LARGE 

E. E. Powell, '13; Philip Wertheimer, '29 Men's Representatives 

Mary York Gadd, '28; Gertrude Chesnut, '27 Women's Representatives 

C. Walter Cole, '21 Immediate Past President 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Editor 

Maryland Alumni News, issued monthly by the University of Maryland Alumni Associa- 
tion at College Park, Md., as second-class matter under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Annual Alumni Association dues are $2.00. One year's subscription to Alumni News, 
50 cents. 

GROUP LEADERS 

ALLEGANY COUNTY: E. Brooke Whitting, '98, President; Dr. Joseph Franklin, '21, Secretary, 
Cumberland, Md. 

BALTIMORE COUNTY: C. Walter Cole, '21, President; H. B. Derrick, '17, Secretary, Towson, 
Maryland. 

BALTIMORE CITY: Chester Tawney, '31, President, 4022 Roland Avenue; E. Gordon Ham- 
mond. '34, Secretary, 1023 W. Barre Street. Baltimore, Md. 

CAROLINE COUNTY: George W. Clendaniel, '20, President; Dr. Maurice A. Brackett, '21, 
Treasurer; Mrs. George W. Clendaniel, '21, Secretary, all of Denton, Md. 

HARFORD COUNTY: W. B. Munnikhuysen, '14, President; H. M. Carroll, '20, Secretary, 
Bel Air, Md. 

FREDERICK COUNTY: J. Homer Remsberg, '18, President; Henry R. Shoemaker, '17, Sec- 
retary. Frederick, Md. 

MONTGOMERY COUNTY: Lawrence G. Smoot, '18, President, Kensington, Md.; Mary Fisher, 
'36. Secretary, Rockville, Md. 

NEW YORK CITY: Donald Kieffer, '30, President, 195 Broadway; Sarah Morris, '25, Secretary, 
310 East 44th Street, New York City. 

PHILADELPHIA: A. Moulton McNutt, '06, President, 413 Cooper Street, Camden, N. J.; J. P. 
Mudd. '07, Secretary, 174 Manheim Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

PITTSBURGH: E. Minor Wenner, '27, President, 1111 Gladys Avenue; Dr. A. A. Krieger, '32, 
Secretary Highland Building. Pittsburgh, Pa. 

WASHINGTON, D. C: J. Douglas Wallop. '19. President. 6139 N. Dakota Avenue. N.W.; 
Charles V. Koons. '29, Secretary, 419 Fourth Street, N.E., Washington. 

WASHINGTON COUNTY: Hon. Henry Holzapfel, Jr., '93, President, Hagerstown, Md.; L. G. 
Mathias, '23, Secretary, Hagerstown, Md. 

"M" CLUB OFFICERS AND BOARD MEMBERS 

Donald H. Adams, '28 President Dr. E. N. Cory, '09 Secretary-Treas. 

A. K. Besley, '23 Vice-President W. R. Maslin, '09 Historian 



REPRESENTATIVES 



G. F. Pollock, '23 Baseball 

H. B. Shipley, '14 Basketball 

Stewart McCaw, '35 Boxing 

James Stevens, '19 Lacrosse 

Lewis W. Thomas, '28 Track 



James Busick, '35 Tennis 

Charles Remsberg, '26 Cross Country 

W. C Supplee, '26 Football 

Dr. E. B. Friedenwald, '03 
Dr. A. W. Valentine, '04 



}.;;: 



At Large 



Cover Picture 

One of the important cogs on the 
football squad is that congenial, enthusi- 
astic, optimistic and cheerful manager. He 
takes it all with a smile from victory to de- 
feat, including the aches and pains. Next 
to the coaches he is the best psychologist 
on the field. His slogan is Keep on fighting, 
pais, and I will pick up the pieces. The gen- 
tleman who adorns our publication is 
"Reds" Miller, because his hair says so. 

e 

Alumni of Maryland 

The call to the Maryland Terrapins for 
football practice brought awakening to 
loyal Alumni and a desire to see them in 
action again. The 
schedule for 1939 is 
interesting and while 
opposition will be 
strong, Maryland will, 
as usual, give every 
opposing team a real 
battle. It is reported 
that we will be over- 
matched in manpow- 
er but, with above av- 
erage material, our 
coaching staff will do all in their power to 
develop a team that will "go places". 

Make your plans to attend as many 
games as possible this fall. The team needs 
your support. Show by your attendance 
that you are alive and interested in the 
affairs of the University. 

"Homecoming Dav", on October 28, 
should be a banner dav. Florida will meet 
Maryland. This means plentv of "fire- 
works" and will provide an afternoon of 
thrills and excitement. Thousands of our 
Alumni and their friends should be at Col- 
lege Park this year. Make it the outstand- 
ing day of all times and one always to be 
remembered. 

Let us begin to look forward to the 
Charter Day Banquet in Baltimore on Jan- 
uary 20, 1940. Plans are already under 
way for a big affair. With your support, we 
(Continued on Page 4) 




HOMECOMING CALLS! 

Old Grads Return 

Saturday, October 28 



Probablv no time of the year causes the 
oldest or the youngest grad to get the old 
familiar college thrill more than the fall. 
School starts, vacations are over, and the 
famous collegiate pastime, football, is on 
the threshold of another chapter in his- 
tory-making. 

It is this time of the year when prac- 
tically every man takes pride in having a 
collegiate affiliation. And when you say 
"Homecoming", it is just like that extra 
pep talk to boost your enthusiasm. Here's 
your opportunity to turn back the pages 
of time and be in the atmosphere of youth 
again . 

Florida Is Grid Opponent 

The annual Terp reunion will be Satur- 
day, October 28, at College Park, with the 
" 'Gators" of Florida providing the grid- 
iron opposition. In addition, the student 
body presents a day of entertainment sim- 
ilar to a Mardi Gras. The fraternities and 
sororities decorate their homes; some enter 
floats in a parade at the half-time of the 
game. Many of the Clubs participate in 



this most colorful spectacle. Then there's 
that traditional tug-'o-war between the 
ambitious Frosh and the sophisticated 
Sophs. After the game, the old grads mix 
and mingle, dine and dance with old pals 
and new friends. It is all a da}' of gayety 
with fellowship and friendship holding 
sway. The enthusiasm and hilarity begin 
Fridav night at a pep rally and bonfire. The 
leader of the rally will probably be Sam 
Regester, '76, one of our oldest living 
Alumni. "Sam", as he tells the boys to 
call him, never misses anv part of the pro- 
gram. 

Among the prominent old timers will 
probably be Dr. W. W. Skinner and Park- 
er Mitchell, of the first team which made 
history for the Old Liners. Also the mem- 
bers of the football team of twenty-five 
years ago will be on hand. 

Every old grad should make his plans 
now to be present. Charles Sylvester, '08, 
and Don Adams, '28, presidents of the 
Alumni Association and "M" Club, re- 
spectively, will lead the return. 



Traveling Terps 
Meet On Coast 

During the summer a reunion of Travel- 
ing Terps was held in the Cadet Lounge 
at the North Island Naval Air Station in 
San Diego. Boy Slye, '36, and Sam Silber, 
'34, both Ensigns in the Navy Flying 
Corps, were hosts to Lieutenant and Mrs. 
Louis Ennis, '36 (the former Marjorie Hig- 
gins), Fredrica Waldman, '39, Audrey 
Bosley, '40, and Sarah Ann Vaiden, '40. 

It was some meeting said Lieutenant 
and Mrs. Ennis, who visited the campus 
this summer. Lou, a Lieutenant in the 
Marine Corps, has been ordered to Fort 
Sill, Oklahoma, where he will attend the 
Army Artillery School this year. 

Arsenal — Perry P. Cowgill, '31, a grad- 
uate in Mechanical Engineering, now is 
with the U. S. Government and located 
at the Frankport Arsenal in Philadelphia. 




Cator Woolford, '89 

This picture appeared in the previous 
issue of The News as Guy Woolford, 
when it should have been Cator Woolford, 
the founder of Retail Credit Corporation. 
The News regrets the error. 



Enrollment Climbing ; 

1 1 00 Freshmen Enter 

Even with the advance in scholastic re- 
quirements the enrollment continues to in- 
crease. Each year it goes up and the higher 
standard does not seem to stem the tide. 

Again the new school year opens with 
a fifteen per cent, increase. More than elev- 
en hundred freshmen have started their 
collegiate career. In addition, a larger per- 
centage of upper classmen have returned, 
bringing the total enrollment to more than 
three thousand students at College Park. 
In Baltimore, professional schools will 
bring the entire University enrollment close 
to five thousand, the largest student body 
in the history of our University. 

The new boys' dormitories were filled 
before negotiations began and the girls' 
dormitories, too, were filled quite early in 
the summer. Buildings were being rushed 
to completion to meet this increase which 
has been accomplished in the boys' dormi- 
tories and the Dining Hall. Every college 
had an increase in registration with the Arts 
and Science Department having the largest. 

More than half of this number reside! 
on the campus or in the vicinity of Col- 
lege Park. The fraternity and sorority 
houses in some cases have a waiting list 
for the first time in many years. 

The old grads who were here in the 
days when there were only a few hun- 
dred students will behold a spectacle on 
Homecoming Day, Saturday, October 28. 
The campus is alive with many ambitious 
young people. 

e 

The President's Message 

(Continued from Page 3) 
can surpass the previous banquets, all of 
which have been very large and excellent 
in all respects. Our association must be 
well represented. Make a date now to meet 
us there. In the meantime, become a mem- 
ber of the Association if you have not al- 
ready sent in your contribution for this 
year. , 

Very sincerely yours, 

Charles W. Sylvester, 

President. 

Married — Jean Cowie, K. D., '37, was 
married on July 1st to Robert L. Hughes, 
Jr., at Havre de Grace, Maryland. Jean has 
been doing social work in Harford County. 



Maryland Alumni News 



s 



4N ANNOUNCEMENT 

on the Broadcasting of 

MARYLAND 
FOOTBALL 



1 It is with much pleasure that The 
\tlantic Refining Company an- 
lounces it will broadcast most of 
four 1939 football schedule. 

As in the past, we will make every 
jffort to give you dignified, accurate, 
exciting entertainment. Your play- 
)y-play commentator has been 
ihosen as much for his thorough 
knowledge of intercollegiate foot- 
Jail as for his ability in radio broad- 
tasting. Advertising announcements 
vill be used moderately and always 
n good taste — never during actual 
blay. 

We hope that during the season 
nany of you who are unable to 
ttend the games will find oppor- 
tunities to tune in one of the stations 
isted below. 




fHE ATLANTIC REFINING COMPANY 







PETROLEUM PRODUCTS 








GAMES TO 


BE BROADCAST 




Sept. 
Oct. 


30 HAMPDEN-SYDNEY 

WFBR WJEJ WSAL 

7 WESTERN MARYLAND 

WFBR WJEJ WSAL 


Oct. 28 
Nov. 4 


FLORIDA 

WDBO WFBR WJAX 
WJEJ WRUF WSAL 

PENN STATE 


Nov. 18 V. M. 1. 

WFBR WJEJ 

Nov. 23 SYRACUSE 

WSYR WFBR 
WJEJ WSAL 


WSAL 
WGY 


Oct. 


14 VIRGINIA 

WBTM WCHV WFBR 
WJEJ WLVA WSAL 
WSVA 


Nov. 11 


KDKA 

GEORGETOWN 

WFBR WJEJ WSAL 


Dec. 2 WASH. & LEE 

WBTM WCHV 
WFBR WJEJ 
WRVA WSAL 


WDBJ 
WLVA 
WSVA 



The Lure of the East 



(Concluded from August Issue) 

Persian Gulf 

On Bahrein Island we haunt the Souk 
for the famous Bahrein pearls, for the pearl 
fisheries are located here, and for brass 
coffee-pots and travs, and the lovelv carved 
woods from the Kashmir. 

We leave to sail up the Persian Gulf, 
and into the Shatt el Arab River, which 
later divides and forms the Tigris and Eu- 
phrates Rivers. The banks of Iraq on our 
left and of Iran on our right are lined with 
date palm trees — for this is the center of 
the world's date industry. We learn that 
each tree is hand pollinated. The beauty 
of the palm gardens, the picturesque ca- 
nals running inland from the river's edge, 
and the pink oleander blossoms reflected 
in the water along the shore made a sur- 
prisinglv beautiful picture through which 
we sailed for a day. 

At Basra we go ashore for a short visit 
before boarding the train for Baghdad. 
In our train compartment we are thankful 
for the fans which somewhat relieve the 
heat and dust as we speed across the sand. 
We learn that the stop made during the 
night occurred when we ran over a guard 
who evidently had fallen alseep on the 
track. 

Magic Carpet 

We soon find that Baghdad docs not 
live up to its Magic Carpet reputation, but 
we do enjoy the bazaars where we indulge 
in some attractive Mosul rugs and the fa- 
mous Amarah silver-work, which secret 
process, by the way, is being exhibited at 
the Iraq Pavilion of the New York lair 
bv the brother of our silversmiths. 

The air conditioned Nairn bus which 
takes us to Damascus crosses the Syrian 
Desert by night. We are given a box lunch 
at 8:30 and at 2:30 A. M. We are awak 
ened for dinner upon our arrival at the 
wells. Distance in the desert is measured 
not by miles, but the distance between 
water-holes! 

Damascus is indeed like an emerald, set 
among its green gardens and surrounded 
bv mountains — some of which are still 
snow-capped. We visit the beautifully built 
Mosques with their courtyards of flowers 



BY ANITA PETERS BURLEIGH, '29 

and fountains, and stop at the tomb of 
Salahud Din, who led the forces of Islam 
in the Crusades. In the old city wall we are 
shown the window through which St. Paul 
escaped by being lowered in a basket. We 
spend a couple days in the Souk, where 
we add to our collection of Persian rugs, 
Oriental necklaces and bracelets, brass and 
copper ware, and old pistols and daggers 
sheathed in silver and semi-precious stones. 
What a shopper's paradise — where one can 
unearth veritable treasures in these old 
shops lining the bazaars! 

By car we go to Baalbeck, where we ex- 
plore the ruins of the beautiful temples 
of Jupiter, Bacchus, and Venus, set in the 
valley of Baal and hemmed in bv the snow- 
covered Lebanons. We see the stones of 
the original Roman temple to Baal, built 
on this site 3,000 vears B. C. Here is an 
opportunity to purchase some old coins 
found bv the natives among the ruins. 

Continuing toward Beirut we pass 
through fields yellow with grain which are 
being harvested bv men in Arab head- 
dress and veiled women. They are harvest- 
ing by hand — a few of them have sickles 
to assist them — and they look for all the 
world like the canvas of "The Gleaners" 
come to life. Here again, the snow on the 
mountains in the background makes an un- 
usual contrast to the golden fields of grain. 

At Beirut we run into old friends, as 
we have been fortunate in doing all along 
the way. We enjoy paddling or idly floating 
over the blue Mediterranean on the little 
individual canvas boats which our hotel 
furnishes us. Our terrace on which we tea- 
dance and dine overlooks the water, and 
at our favorite restaurant we throw coins 
over the rail and watch the bovs dive for 
them. We are taken through the beautiful 
campus of the American University by two 
former graduates, and ponder upon the 
wonderful work this college has done 
throughout the Near East. 

From now on we are on our homeward 
journey — but we look forward to it with 
much anticipation. We gaze at Mt. Carmel 
from our ship, but do not go ashore at 
Haifa because of the recent disturbances 
in Palestine. 

(Continued on Page 7) 



From The Diamondback 

Dear Alumnus: 

You no doubt are aware that another 
college year is starting and with it all the 
activities and current events that are at- 
tached to your rapidly growing Alma Ma- 
ter. Though you have lost your undergrad- 
uate standing, as an Alumnus you have 
gained a more vital position on the Uni- 
versity of Maryland's records. In this capac- 
ity you owe it to the University and to 
yourself to keep posted in regard to cur- 
rent weekly news on the University cam- 
pus. This can really only be accomplished 
through the semi weekly paper, The Dia- 
mondback. 

This publication is assisting in a special 
attempt to bring the Alumni closer to their 
Alma Mater and it can only succeed in 
this through vour cooperation in subscrib- 
ing. Being Old Liners, vou are familiar 
with the paper and the service it renders. 
No salesmanship is necessary; our only 
purpose in contacting you is to offer you 
the means to satisfy that interest you have 
in regard to the University and student af- 
fairs. 

Yes, you do receive The Alumni News, 
but The Diamondback offers you more cur- 
rent news and opens many fields of events 
that can not be covered by vour magazine. 

With the hope that you will desire not 
to lose contact with your Alma Mater, may 
we remind you that the subscription price 
for the full school year is two dollars 
(S2.00) and that subscriptions should be 
sent to: 

Circulation Manager, The Diamond- 
back, University of Maryland, College 
Park, Maryland. 

We shall hope to hear from you soon. 
Sincerely vours, 

Ralph J. Tyser, 
Circulation Manager. 
• 

Quaint Acres — In a contact with Quaint 
Acres, near Silver Spring, Maryland, a 
fruit and nursery farm, it was learned 
that H. W. Ouaintance, '23, better known 
as "Phoebe", is a member of the firm. 
Also Mr. and Mrs. Ouaintance have a 
family consisting of a boy and a girl. The 
girl is the older and goes by the name of 
Phoebe, while the boy has the name of 
John Altus. Mrs. Ouaintance was form- 
erly Miss Dorothy Davis of Eastern Shore. 



Maryland Alumni News 



Maryland Leases 1800 
Acres From Government 

Leasing 1800 acres from the Federal 
Government for recreational and educa- 
tional purposes, the University of Mary- 
land announced that "Browning's Tract". 
an area in Garrett County, was officially 
turned over to the school in a ninety-nine 
vear lease on August 9. 

Its primarv use will be for a demonstra- 
tion and field practice area in the teach- 
ing, research work, and investigating of 
forestrv, engineering, the biological sci- 
ences, and wildlife management. 

The tract will have facilities for picnick- 
ing, camping, swimming, winter sports, 
and other recreational activities. 
e 

Law — The firm of McNeill and Ed- 
wards, attorneys and counselors at law, 
announce the opening of their offices in 
the Heurich Building, 1827 K Street, 
N.W., Washington, D. C. Earl Edwards, 
'34, a member of Phi Delta Theta, got his 
LL.D. from National University in 1937. 
He married Martha Cannon, '3 5, a mem- 
ber of A. O. Pi. 



Gov. O'Conor Will 
Head Dedication 

Headed by Gov. Herbert R. O'Conor, 
a full day's program has been planned for 
October 21, when the new livestock and 
dairy buildings and plant will be dedi- 
cated. The event is expected to attract the 
largest gathering of stockmen and dairy- 
men ever assembled at the University. 

The new facilities for service to this im- 
portant phase of Maryland agriculture rank 
among the best of their kind in this eoun- 
trv. The visitors on Dedication Day will 
have opportunitv to inspect the new build- 
ings and livestock, as well as hear addresses 
by officials and specialists of the University 
and from outside the State. A buffet lunch- 
eon will be served on the campus at noon. 



Public Relations Man — Ralph Chase, 
'23, former manager of the county dis- 
pensary system, now is to be made public 
relations man for the new administration 
in Montgomery County, a position cre- 
ated recently by the Legislature. He re- 
sides at 435 Raymond Street, Chevy Chase, 
Marvland. 



University Installs 
Air Course 

Culminating a year's drive to secure 
flight training courses at the University, 
Dean Sidney S. Steinberg announced this 
week that the Civil Aeronautic Authority 
has approved Maryland's application and 
training will begin this semester. 

The purpose of the program is to pro- 
vide sufficient training to prepare a student 
for a private pilot certificate of competency. 
A full year's course will be offered in two 
parts, consisting of ground school and 
flight instruction. 

• 

Joslyn Acting 
Head Of Sociology 

Dr. C. S. Joslyn has been appointed 
professor and acting head of the Sociologv 
Department. 

Serving with Dr. Joslyn is Dr. Logan 
Wilson from Harvard University who en- 
ters the department this vear as an asso- 
ciate professor. Acting as an assistant pro- 
fessor is Mr. Robert N. Woodworth from 
the Universitv of North Carolina. 



THE LURE OF THE EAST 



(Continued from Page 6) 
At Alexandria we disembark to see Pom- 
pev's Pillar and other places of interest 
missed on our first visit. 

Our next stop is Athens, where we 
spend a marvelous day on the Acropolis. 
We find the Parthenon and Erectheum 
even surpass our life-long expectations of 
them — thev are indeed superb! In the 
Olvmpic Stadium one of our friends — a 
former Universitv of California track star — 
demonstrates how the discus should be 
thrown, putting to shame the modern as 
well as ancient Greeks! 

Enroute to Naples we pass through the 
narrow Straits of Messina, at the toe of 
Italy, and watch the twinkling lights on 
the steep hillsides. We enjoy again Mt. 
Vesuvius, Pompeii, Herculaneum, and the 
unsurpassable Amalfi Drive — with lunch 
at the old Cappuchini Monastery. We do 
not land on the Isle of Capri this time, 
but pass close bv and recall her brightlv 
colored houses and the Blue Grotto, il- 



luminated by its silvery blue water. 

At Naples and later at Leghorn we see 
manv Italian battleships and submarines in 
the harbor. 

We drive from Genoa along the pic- 
turesque Italian Riviera, passing the Castle 
of the Crown Prince and stopping at the 
fascinating fishing village of Portofino to 
purchase lace from the women working in 
the sunny streets. 

Near Marseilles we visit the Chateau d'lf 
and are shown how the Count of Monte 
Cristo is supposed to have effected his es- 
cape from the prison island. 

We pass Gibraltar, through the Gates 
of Hercules, and follow the Spanish coast 
for a distance, admiring the patchwork 
fields rich with grain, and straining our 
eyes to see any marks of the recent civil 
war left on the city of Cadiz. We gaze at 
the coast of Tangicrs with a sigh, and 
know that we are really homeward bound 
for we have just been handed our customs 
declarations blanks! 



Marines — It is now First Lieutenant 
Louis Ennis of the United States Marine 
Corps by recent promotion. A member of 
the class of '36, Lou is remembered for 
his powers on the gridiron and president 
of the Student Government Association. 
He was a lacrosse star and Colonel of the 
R. O. T. C. For his outstanding leadership 
he was awarded the Citizenship Prize and 
the Silvester Medal in his senior vear. The 
best of success to vou, Lou. 



Salisbury — Bettie Harcum, '38, now is 
secretary to Dr. Phillip Insley. '30, M.D. 
'34, in Salisbury, Md. 

O 

Married — Roy C. Meinzer, '38, and 
Miss Shirley Dorothy Quesada of Wash- 
ington were married July 25. Best man 
was David Mitchell, '39, and other Alum- 
ni were ushers — Keith Lawson, '38, Ray 
Pittman, '38 and Richard Lynt, '39. The 
newlyweds will reside at 1712 Hampton 
Blvd., Norfolk, Virginia. Roy is with the 
Portsmouth Navy Yard as a mechnical en- 
gineer. 



September, 1939 



Old Line Athletic Contributions 



By W. H. ("Bill") HOTTEL: 



Hampden-Sydney Clash 
Is Test For Terps 

With the opening game with Hampden- 
Svdney at College Park, September 30, at 
hand, the Maryland grid squad is only 
fairly well set to tackle the Tigers, always 
one of the most capable small college elev- 
ens in the East. It will be the first time the 
Terps and Tigers have battled on the grid- 
iron, although they have met in other pas- 
times. 

Hampden-Sydney, with 17 letter men, 
enjoys the benefit of the experience of 
the game with Virginia at Charlottesville 
on September 23 for its visit to Col- 
lege Park. It is not such a heavy eleven, but 
is one of the fastest and versatile to repre- 
sent the Tigers. It is said to be particularly 
well prepared for an aerial attack. 

Smith Coaches Tigers 
H. E. Smith, one-time Furman star, who 
has been assistant for a number of years, 
is head coach of the Tigers, Charlie Bernier, 
head coach for many years, having decided 
to devote his time to the athletic director- 
ship. 

Hampden-Sydney has 41 men on its 
squad, which is two more than the Terps 
can boast. 

The Terps have lost Bob Smith, regular 
center, for the opener, but the veteran 
snapperback again is practicing. Jim Whar- 
ton, a 160-pound soph, is filling Smith's 
place but, unless injuries should remove 
others, the starting team for the inaugural 
otherwise will be veteran. 

Training Two Teams 

Coach Frank Dobson's plans call to keep 
two teams going as nearly intact as possible 
and with Smith and all others available 
for duty this pair of outfits line up as fol- 
lows: 

Beamer and Shaffer, ends; Brown and 
Albarano, tackles; Gienger and Lawrence, 
guards; Smith, center; Murphy, quarter; 
Mondorff and Skotnicki, halfbacks; Lums- 
den, fullback. 

Mueller and Dwyer, ends; Krouse and 
Blazek, tackles; Morton and Lloyd, guards; 
(Continued on Page 9) 



MARYLAND'S 1939 GRID SQUAD 



(FROM 1938 VARSITY SQUAD) 













Yrs. on 






Name 


Pos. 


Ht. 


Wt. 


Age 


Squad 


High School 


Home 


*Francis Beamer 


End 


6-2>/ 2 


183 


22 


3 


Roosevelt 


Washington, D. C 


*Leo Mueller 


End 


5-11 


175 


21 


2 


Balto. City Coll. 


Baltimore, Md. 


* Frank Dwyer 


End 


6-2 


174 


22 


2 


Forest Park 


Baltimore, Md. 


*Richard Shaffer 


End 


6-3 


181 


20 


2 


Ferndale 


Denton, Md. 


* Robert Brown 


Tackle 


6-1 


216 


21 


3 


W. Hazleton 


W. Hazleton, Pa. 


*Ralph Albarano 


Tackle 


6 


198 


24 


3 


Lilly 


Lilly, Pa. 


*Frank Blazek 


Tackle 


6-1 


190 


20 


2 


Poly 


Baltimore, Md. 


* Robert Cochrane 


Tackle 


6 


202 


21 


2 


Forest Park 


Baltimore, Md. 


*Bill Krouse 


Tackle 


6-2 


233 


22 


2 


Western 


Bethesda, Md. 


* George Lawrence 


Guard 


6-1 V2 


184 


23 


3 


Fr. & Mar. Acad. 


Hanover, Pa. 


George Gienger 


Guard 


6 


201 


25 


2 


Scottsville 


Brentwood, Md. 


* Edward Lloyd 


Guard 


5-11 


179 


23 


3 


Western 


Washington, D. C 


*Elmer Bright 


Tackle 


5-11 


200 


21 


2 


Poly 


Baltimore, Md. 


*Robert Smith 


Center 


5-11 


190 


22 


2 


Tome 


Woodlynne, N. J. 


*Joe Murphy 


Back 


5-10 


151 


22 


2 


Tome 


Carney's Pt., N. J 


Pershing Mondorff Back 


5-11 


195 


21 


3 


Emmitsburg 


Emmitsburg, Md. 


*John Boy da 


Back 


6 


188 


23 


3 


Vocational 


Iselin, Pa. 


*Frank Skotnicki 


Back 


5-10 


168 


21 


3 


W. Hazleton 


W. Hazleton, Pa. 


* Robert Brand 


Back 


6-1 


168 


21 


3 


Eastern 


Washington, D. C 


*Fred Widener 


Back 


5-10 


173 


20 


2 


Balto. City Coll. 


Baltimore, Md. 



* 1938 Letter Men. 



(FROM 1938 JUNIOR VARSITY SQUAD) 



Name 
John Morton 
Frank Heyer 
Paul McNeill 
Vernon Miller 
Milton Lumsden 



Pos. Ht. 
Guard 5-10 
Guard 5-11 
Center 6 
Back 5-10 
Back 5-9 



Yrs. on 
Wt. Age Squad 



186 19 

181 19 

188 19 

145 20 

181 20 



High School 
Roxborough 
McDonogh 
Kingston 



Home 
Mt. Airy, Md. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Baltimore, Md. 



Gene Ochsenreiter Back 5-11 160 20 



Highland Springs Highl'd Sp'gs, Va. 
Poly Baltimore, Md. 

Rich-Montgomery Rockville, Md. 



(FROM 1938 FRESHMAN SQUAD) 













Yrs. on 






Name 


Pos. 


Ht. 


Wt. 


Age 


Squad 


High School 


Home 


Larry MacKenzie 


End 


6-1 


177 


19 




Forest Park 


Silver Spring, Md 


Ashton Garrett 


Guard 


6-2 


184 


19 




Rich-Montgom. 


Rockville, Md. 


Ralph Burlin 


Tackle 


6-1 


190 


21 




Tome 


P't Deposit, Md. 


Max Hunt 


Guard 


5-10 


183 


19 




Towanda 


Silver Spring, Md. 


James Wharton 


Center 


6 


155 


21 




Forest Park 


Baltimore, Md. 


Merle DuVall 


Back 


5-10 


169 


19 




Mt. St. Joe 


Baltimore, Md. 


Elmer Rigby 


Back 


5-11 


165 


21 




Forest Park 


Baltimore, Md. 


James Dunn 


Back 


5-10 


160 


18 




Staunton M. A. 


Washington, D. C. 


John Cordyack 


Back 


6 


171 


21 




Osceola Mills 


Baltimore, Md. 


Bernie Ulman 


Back 


6-1 


165 


21 




Forest Park 


Baltimore, Md. 


Jack Warfield 


Back 


5-11 


155 


21 




Balto. City Coll. 


Baltimore, Md. 



LOSSES FROM 1938 VARSITY 

End — Nick Budkoff; Guard — John DeArmey; Center — Jim Forrester; Backs — Jim 
Meade, Charlie Weidinger and Fred Hewitt. Meade was a powerhouse for two seasons, but 
broke an ankle October 1, last fall; Budkoff played in only one 1938 game; Weidinger was a 
great passer and fine runner, while DeArmey, Forrester and Hewitt were clever reserves. 



Maryland Alumni News 



Terrapin 1939 Squad 



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Front Row — Gienger, Garrett, Vial, Dunn, Lloyd, Brand, Mueller, Rigby. 

Second Row — Lawrence, Boyda, Murphy, Smith, Beamer, Skotnicki, Brown, Dwyer, Shaffer, Albarano. 

Third Row — DuVall, McNeil, Heyer, Ulman, Cordyack, Bright, Blazek, Krouse, Morton, Abell. 

Back Row — Hepburn, MacKenzie, Cochrane, Lumsden, Manager Miller, Hunt, Miller, Burlin, Wharton, Mondorff. 

Widener and Ochsenreitei not in picture. 



Hampden-Sydney Clash 
Is Test For Terps 

(Continued from Page 8) 
Wharton, center; DuVall, quarter; Boyda 
and Ulman, halfbacks; Widener, full- 
back. 

Gienger, Morton, and Lumsden, who 
are juniors, and Wharton, DuVall, and 
Ulman, who are sophs, are the only non- 
letter men on the first two elevens. 
Passers And Kickers 

DuVall and Mondorff have been doing 
the best passing, with Murphy and Boyda 
also throwing the ball. All four are kickers, 
with Mondorff and Murphy excelling. 

Murphy is the speedster of these two 
combinations with Vernon Miller, Elmer 
Rigbv, and Gene Ochsenreiter, three other 
fliers, on the reserve list. Rigby, though, 
has two broken bones in his hand and won't 
be available for a game or two. 

There is plenty of weight and speed in 
the Terp squad but football experience is 
somewhat lacking. 



ALUMNI FOOTBALL RALLY 



RUTGERS - MARYLAND GAME 

NEW BRUNSWICK, N. J. 

SATURDAY, OCT. 21 

Following the Rutgers-Marvland foot 
ball game at New Brunswick, N. J., on 
Saturday, October 21, the New York 
Alumni Group will hold an Alumni 
Rally and Cocktail Party at the Wood- 
row Wilson Hotel, as announced by 
James Dingman, president. The hotel 
is located near the stadium. Chairman 
of the meeting is Malcom Rich, '23, 
with Don Kieffer, '29, as his able as- 
sistant. 

The Philadelphia Group, headed by 
A. Moulton McNutt, '06, president, 
and John P. Mudd, '07, secretary, will 
join with the New Yorkers in promot- 
ing this affair. 

For tickets in the Maryland section, 
Alumni are requested to write Rutgers 
Athletic Office, New Brunswick, N. J. 
On the day of the game go to the Mary- 
land side and ask for tickets in the spe- 
cial section. 

A record attendance is expected. Do 
not miss it. 



Pair Of Grid Dates 
Still Uncertain 

Two Maryland football dates still are 
somewhat undecided. It seems certain that 
the Washington and Lee tilt, booked orig- 
inally for November 30 in the Baltimore 
Stadium, will be plaved December 2, if at 
all; it is likely that the Syracuse clash 
on the card for November 25 at College 
Park will be moved to the 23rd, the new 
Turkey Day date, and it has been decided 
that the Western Maryland battle, slated 
for the Baltimore Stadium on October 7, 
will be staged at night. 

Maryland's policy is against night foot- 
ball as a general thing, and playing the Ter- 
rors under arcs, is in the nature of an ex- 
periment and will not lead to more than 
one such contest a season. 



Virginia — Roy C. Meinzer, '38, a grad 
uate engineer, now is located in Norfolk, 
Virginia, at 1712 Hampton Boulevard. 



September, 1939 



Grapevine News About Those We Know 



Birth — Mr. and Mrs. Robert Reid an- 
nounce the arrival of Barbara Joan, born 
September I, 1939, in the University Hos- 
pital. Mrs. Reid is the former Flo Wald- 
man, '37, an A. O. Pi, and past secretary 
of the Student Government Association. 
Bob, a member of '36, is located in Balti- 
more. The nevvlyweds reside in Towson, 
Maryland. 

O 

Married — Kav Thompson, Tri Delt, '37, 
married Lieutenant Carl Lentz in June, 
soon after he was graduated from West 
Point. They will be stationed in Alabama. 



World's Fair — Edward and Connie 
(Nash) Gibbs are living in Flushing, N. 
Y. Eddie is with the United States Steel 
Exhibit at the Fair and any time you 
Marylanders are up this way be sure and 
stop in to see him. Eddie's running com- 
mentary of the exhibit as it unfolds be- 
fore your eyes improves as the summer 
slips bv and fall visitors to the Fair 
should find it particularly entertaining. 



Dietitian — Helen Kaylor, K. D., '38, is 
employed in the capacity of dietitian at 
the University Hospital in Baltimore. 



Surgeon — Dr. William (Bill) Long, Jr., 
is Assistant Resident Surgeon at University 
Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. He is a 
member of Phi Delta Theta. 



Birth — Louis & Josephine (Allen) Flagg 
have a son, born several months ago. He 
looks as if he may be a future engineer. 
Louis is a member of Tau Beta Pi. They 
are living in Takoma Park, Maryland. 



Married — Mary Dow, K. D., '38, mar- 
ried John Beyers and they are now living 

in D. C. 

o 

Building — E. O. Simpson, '18, of 
Chance, Maryland, is with his father in 
the construction business in Washington 
and environs. 



Business — Ed Minion, '36, is with Rem- 
ington Rand, Inc., in Newark, N. J. He is 
in the Business Machine Division. 



Dictaphone — Ernest Wooden, Phi Del- 
ta Theta, '34, is with the Dictaphone 
Corporation in Norfolk, Virginia, where he 
is the city manager. Incidentally, Ernie 
works under Ed. Holloway, '08, who is dis- 
trict manager, with offices in Baltimore. 
O 

Birth — Dr. George and Van Mathcke 
announce the birth of a daughter, Marie 
Berry, on June 22, 1939. They have a son, 
Michael John, who is 3 years old. Dr. 
Matheke was a member of Phi Delta Theta 
while at College Park. He was graduated 
from Medical School in '33. Dr. Matheke 
resides at 292 Park Avenue, in East Or- 
ange, New Jersey. 



Montana — Where was Felisa Jenkins, 
'31, this summer? She was in Jackson's 
Hole, Wyoming, at the Dude Ranch. Fe- 
lisa is assistant dietitian at the University 
Hospital. 

O 

Maine — This past summer Misses Mir- 
iam Connolly, dietitian at the University 
Hospital, and Estella Baldwin, head nurse 
at College Park, invaded the State of 
Maine and, according to them, annexed it 
to the United States more solidly than 
ever before. If the dietitians and nurses 
can't do it, who can? 



Baltimore — James Oswald McWilliams, 
'29, is with the Kirkwood Commission 
Merchants of Baltimore. James married 
Miss Elizabeth Kirkwood, '31, a member 
of Kappa Delta. 

O 

Married — The former Terp twirler, Ste- 
phen Physioc, '35, and Miss Olive McGil- 
licuddy of Glenn Falls, New York, were 
married August. 26. His side kick, Bucky 
Buscher, '35, was best man. Steve is a 
member of Lambda Chi Alpha and now 
is connected with the Commercial Credit 
Corporation. 



Preble Heads 

R. O. T. C. Unit 

Merle Preble, a senior in Arts and Sci- 
ence, has been appointed Cadet Colonel 
of the R. O. T. C. regiment for the en- 
suing year. He is also a member of the 
Rifle Team and is quite a marksman. He 
was a member cf the Third Corps R. O. T. 
C. team which competed in the National 
Meet at Camp Perry, Ohio, this summer. 
The Maryland boys on the team were Pre- 
ble, Tom Coleman, Willard Jensen, and 
Bob Laughead, who helped win the Na- 
tional Collegiate "Minute Men Trophy" 
for the Third Corps Area. Preble led the 
team with a score of 271 out of a possible 
300. 

Mary Jenkins Enters 
Extension Service 

Miss Mary Jenkins, '38, Home Econom- 
ics, has been appointed home demonstra- 
tion agent for Essex County, Virginia. 
Marv, a first honor student in Home Eco- 
nomics, is one of the youngest persons to 
be appointed to this type position in the 
nation, according to the Extension Service 
officials. 

Marv has been very active in youth activ- 
ities, taking part in numerous 4-H Club 
projects. She won special honors and was 
appointed as delegate to a number of 4-H 
Club All Star Conventions. Mary is a 
member of Phi Kappa Phi, national hon- 
orary scholastic fraternity. 
• 

Lambda Chi Alpha 

When the Eighteenth National Bian- 
nual Convention of the Lambda Chi Al- 
pha Fraternity was held in San Francisco, 
the last of August found Nelson R. Jones 
of Washington as the Maryland represen- 
tative. Jones will serve on the "State of 
the Fraternity and Audit Committee". 
Most of the main events were held on the 
Treasure Island Fairgrounds of the Golden 
Gate International Exposition. 

California — "California, here I come!" 
says Carolyn Clugston, '39, a member of 
Kappa Kappa Gamma. Carolyn, an active 
figure in student affairs, will now reside at 
528 North Rodeo Drive, Beverly Hills, Cal- 
ifornia. 



10 



Maryland Alumni News 



Admiral Rossiter, Retired, 
On Gallinger Staff 

The former Surgeon General of the 
United States Navy Medical Corps. Ad- 
miral P. S. Rossiter, M.D. "95, has been 
appointed Chief of Staff at the Gallinger 
Hospital in Washington. 

Admiral Rossiter was quite a prominent 
figure in the organization and early plan- 
ning of the new Naval Hospital now being 
constructed in Montgomery County, Mary- 
land. 

e 

Dietitian — Bettv McCormick, Ho:nc 
Economics, '39, is a dietetics student in 
the University Hospital in Baltimore. 



Married — Miss Isabel Hamilton and 
James Turnbull. members of the clas^ of 
'38, were married this past summer. Rob- 
ert Walton, another classmate, was best 
man. with Joseph Hamilton. '32. and \\ ar- 
ren Gilbcrtson, '38, as ushers. 



U. S. D. A.— II. L. Marshall. '2 3, with 
the Bureau of Chemistrv and Soils, who 
was formerly in Florida, has returned to 
Maryland and is located in College Park. 
His daughter attends Ilyattsville High 
School, of which J. A. Miller, '12, is prin- 
cipal. 

O 

Kefauver — Harry J. Kcfauver, '00, Doc- 
tor of Philosophy, is Chief of Occupational 
Therapy and Physiotherapy of the Medi- 
cal and Hospital Service, Veterans Admin- 
istration, in Washington, D. C. His home 
address is Frederick, Maryland. 

Elmer C. Kefauver, '91, M.D.. is the 
Countv Health Officer for Frederick 
Countv. 



Grapevine News About Those We Know 



New England — While on a vacation to 
Maine this summer, C. L. Mackert, '20. 
visited two former Terp gridiron stars — 
Jcrrv Sullivan, "20. in Boston, Massachu- 
setts, and R. J. Paganucci, '22. in Water 
ville, Maine. Jerry is vice-president of the 
George A. Fuller Construction Company 
in charge of the Boston office. "Paggie", 
one of the original members of the famous 
"Climax Club" of the early twenties, is 
with the Winslow Coal Company of 
Winslow, Maine. In each \isit there was 
many a football incident rehashed. 



Married — Miss Evelyn Lilian Sullivan, 
'39, and Warren Hubbard Gilbcrtson, '38, 
were recently married. The bride is a mem- 
ber of the Kappa Delta Sorority. Warren 
is a member of the faculty of the Vienna 
High School at Vienna, Maryland. 



Railroad — Last year's pivot man of the 

football squad, Jim Forrester, '39, now is 

with the Pennsylvania Railroad Company 

in the track department. He is stationed at 

Toledo, Ohio. 

o 

Visiter — Among the summer visitors to 
the campus was H. Clifton Byrd, Jr., '36. 
"Cliff" is located in Boston, Massachusetts, 
with the George A. Fuller Construction 
Company. 

o 

Clay — Edward Daly. '3", a former grid- 
iron star for the Terps, now is with the 
United States Clav Products and located 
in Washington, D. C. He is a graduate in 
the College of Agriculture. 



Deceased— -Pin; News regrets to an- 
nounce the death of Mrs. C. A. Chaney, 
wife of C. A. Chaney, '11, a resident of 
\\ ashington, D. C. Mrs. Chaney was for 
merlv Miss Lindbcrg. She is survived bv 
her husband and one son, Charles E. 
Chaney. 

The Chancvs reside at 1707 Kelbourne 
Place. N.W., Washington, D. C. On be 
half of the Alumni Association, Tin; News 
takes this occasion to express sincere con- 
dolence to Mr. Chaney and his son in this 
hour of bereavement. 



Big Leaguer — Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
Keller. '38, announce the arrival of another 
Yankee outfielder, born August 1, weigh- 
ing IVi pounds. Of course, he will do his 
preliminary training with the Terrapin 
Diamonders, just like Daddy. Mrs. Keller 
was formerlv Miss Martha Williamson, 

'39. 



Birth — Mr. and Mrs. Coleman Hcadlev 
announce the arrival of a baby girl named 
.Mice. Mrs. Hcadlev was formerly Miss 
Francis Kercher, '38, a runner-up in the 
Terrapin's Miss Maryland contest. Cole- 
man, '38, is the former gridiron and track- 
ster of the Old Line fame. The Headlevs 
live near Laurel, Maryland. 



Birth — Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Dorrance 
Kelly, '34, have a male addition to the 
family by the name of Dorrance Talmadgc, 
born January. 1939. His poundage is good 
and by 1957 he should be a good tackle 
or guard. Mrs. Kelly was formerlv Amy 
Mister of Kappa Kappa Gamma. 



CUT ON THIS LINE 



THE NEW YEAR DRIVE IS ON 

V i 1 1 You Join Your Fellow Alumni? 



Fellow Alumni: 

wish to be a contributing member of 
i University of Maryland Alumni As. 
:iation, and am enclosing the usual 
tint of $2.00 for the year 1939-1940, 
this fifty cents is for one year's sub- 
iption to the Alumni News. 



^PLEASE FILL OUT AND RETURN THIS BLANK NOW ! ! 



Name Class 

Address _ 

Married? .To whom ... 
Business address 



Occupation 



Children 



Title 



vv. m 



i 




TS A DATE Wm 



. the cigarette that's different from all others 

It's the right combination of mild, ripe, 
home-grown and aromatic Turkish tobaccos 
. . the world's best . . that makes Chesterfield 
the milder and better-tasting cigarette . . 

A HAPPY COMBINATION for 

MORE SMOKING PLEASURE 




iase 



ALUMNI 
NEWS 



OCTOBER 
1939 




"''^ . ^H^/, , / , ^^^ ..■ ..Iuj,.,.^/. 



■u . , ■ „ „ rM^Y jJat 




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/ 




/i 






■ _ 



11 



Look, Pop! It's a Homer! 

Not last week's game; not something that happened yesterday; not even a 
minute ago. But right now! Seeing things — miles away — at the very instant 
they happen! That's the new thrill that television now makes possible. 



// 



BUT television is destined to do more than 
this lor us. The foundation is laid for a 
whole new industry — careers for artists; jobs for 
hundreds of engineers and thousands of skilled 
workmen making television transmitters and re- 
ceivers; jobs for thousands more selling and 
servicing this new product and providing the 
raw materials required. These are important pos- 
sibilities of television. 

For more than 60 years, General Electric 
scientists, engineers, and workmen have 
been finding new ways for electricity to serve 



the public — in factory, farm, and home. The 
new products and services made possible 
by their work have helped to produce the 
steady rise in the living standards of the 
American people. 

And right now, as television emerges from 
the laboratory to take its place among the 
accomplished marvels of this age of electricity, 
these G-E pioneers are once again creating, not 
only "More Goods for More People at Less 
Cost,'' but also MORE AND BETTER JOBS 
AT HIGHER WAGES. 



G-E research and engineering have saved the public from ten to one hundred dollars 
for every dollar they have earned for General Electric 



GENERAL H ELECTRIC 



Volume XI 



MARYLAND ALUMNI NEWS, OCTOBER, 1939 



Number 5 



Alumni Association — University of Maryland 

Founded in 1892 



OFFICERS FOR 1939 - 40 

Charles W. Sylvester, '08, President 
Baltimore, Md. 

P. W. Chichester, '20, First Vice-President Frederick, Md. 

H. W. Burnside, '04, Second Vice-President Washington, D. C. 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Secretary-Treasurer College Park, Md. 

ALUMNI BOARD 
(Note — - The officers named above are also members of the Alumni Board) 

J. Donald Kieffer, '30 Arts and Sciences 

Charles V. Koons, '29 Engineering 

R. R. Lewis, '19 Education 

John A. Silkman, '35 Agriculture 

Ruth Miles, '31 Home Economics 

Norwood Sothoron, '34 Commerce 

MEMBERS AT LARGE 

E. E. Powell, '13; Philip Wertheimer, '29 Men's Representatives 

Mary York Gadd, '28; Gertrude Chesnut, '27 Women's Representatives 

C. Walter Cole, '21 Immediate Past President 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Editor 

Maryland Alumni News, issued monthly by the University of Maryland Alumni Associa- 
tion at College Park, Md., as second-class matter under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Annual Alumni Association dues are $2.00. One year's subscription to Alumni News, 
50 cents. 

GROUP LEADERS 

ALLEGANY COUNTY: E. Brooke Whitting, '98, President; Dr. Joseph Franklin, '21, Secretary, 
Cumberland, Md. 

BALTIMORE COUNTY: C. Walter Cole, '21, President; H. B. Derrick, '17, Secretary, Towson. 
Maryland. 

BALTIMORE CITY: Chester Tawney, '31, President, 4022 Roland Avenue; E. Gordon Ham- 
mond, '34, Secretary, 1023 W. Barre Street. Baltimore, Md. 

CAROLINE COUNTY: George W. Clendaniel, '20. President; Dr. Maurice A. Brackett, '21. 
Treasurer; Mrs. George W. Clendaniel, '21, Secretary, all of Denton, Md. 

HARFORD COUNTY: W. B. Munnikhuysen, '14, President; H. M. Carroll, '20, Secretary. 
Bel Air, Md. 

FREDERICK COUNTY: J. Homer Remsberg, '18, President; Henry R. Shoemaker, '17, Sec- 
retary, Frederick, Md. 

MONTGOMERY COUNTY: Lawrence G. Smoot, '18, President, Kensington, Md.; Mary Fisher. 
'36, Secretary, Rockville, Md. 

NEW YORK CITY: Donald Kieffer, '30, President, 195 Broadway; Sarah Morris, '25, Secretary. 
310 East 44th Street, New York City. 

PHILADELPHIA: A. Moulton McNutt, '06, President, 413 Cooper Street, Camden, N. J.; J. P. 
Mudd. '07, Secretary. 174 Manheim Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

PITTSBURGH: E. Minor Wenner, '27, President. 1111 Gladys Avenue; Dr. A. A. Krieger. '32. 
Secretary Highland Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

./ASHINGTON, D. C: J. Douglas Wallop, '19, President. 6139 N. Dakota Avenue, N.W.; 
Charles V. Koons. '29, Secretary, 419 Fourth Street, N.E., Washington. 

.VASHINGTON COUNTY: Hon. Henry Holzapfel, Jr., '93, President, Hagerstown. Md.; L. G. 
Mathias, '23, Secretary, Hagerstown, Md. 

"M" CLUB OFFICERS AND BOARD MEMBERS 



Donald H. Adams, '28 President 

A. K. Besley, '23 Vice-President 



Dr. E. N. Cory, '09 Secretary-Treas. 

W. R. Maslin, '09 Historian 



REPRESENTATIVES 



G. F. Pollock, '23 Baseball 

H. B. Shipley, '14 Basketball 

Stewart McCaw, '35 Boxing 

James St- '19 Lacrosse 

Lewis ..uMas, '28 Track 



James Busick, '35 Tennis 

Charles Remsberg, '26 Cross Country 

W. C Suppi.ee, '26 Football 

Dr. E. B. Friedenwald, '03 ) . T 

Dr. A. W. Valentine, '04 J At Lar S e 



Cover Picture 

On the cover is an etching reproduction 
of the historically famous Rossborough 
Inn. It is the oldest structure on the Uni- 
versity of Maryland campus and has been 
restored to its original colonial architec- 
ture as built in 1795. Our Alumni do not 
remember this building as it is now be- 
cause the old building had been recon- 
structed in 1888, but they will remember 
the location as that has not been changed. 
The changes that have taken place are 
pleasing to look at and every Alumnus will 
rejoice in seeing the old landmark properlv 
restored. 

All indications now point to the build 
ing being used as a historical museum. It 
will be furnished in period furniture many 
pieces of which have already been prom- 
ised by Maryland families of Colonial 
fame. If any Alumnus wishes to make any 
contributions to this collection, please 
communicate with the Alumni Secretary, 
also if you hear of anyone who might be 
interested in adding to this collection. 



Greetings! Alumni of Maryland 

October 28, 1939, is the date for our 
"Annual Homecoming.*' Committees arc 
at work and plans for the day include 
events which should 
bring vou back to 
Maryland. For sev- 
eral years, there has 
been an increasing in- 
terest in this annual 
affair. Let us "go 
over the top" in a 
big way and let the 
world know that we 
are a part of the great 
University of Mary- 
land. 

Early on Saturday, the 28th, you should 
take a trip around the campus and become 
acquainted with its many marvelous build- 
ing changes. Learn also of the educational 
(Continued on Page 7) 




Homecoming To Present Terrapin Luminaries; 
Charley Keller, Guest Of Honor 



Among the luminaries who will be pres- 
ent for the sixteenth annual Homecoming 
is Charley Keller, '36, recent baseball 
World Series hero. With him will be 
Mrs. Keller, the former Miss Martha Wil- 
liamson, '37. Other dignitaries from the 
big show will be Bozcv Berger, '35, of the 
Boston Red Sox and Jim Meade, '39, of 
the Washington Redskins. All will be on 
hand for the game and will attend the 
Mixer and Supper Dance where the Alum- 
ni will have an opportunity to meet them. 

In addition to the present day heroes, 
there will be those boys who made history 
on the gridiron twenty- five years ago. The 
football team of 1914 will be honored 
guests of the day. They will be assembled 
in a special box behind the Terrapin's 
bench. These boys will get a close-up of 
the modern plaver who enters the game 
in a suit which he wears only for games. 
The bovs of 14 recall their days when you 
played and practiced in the same outfit. 
Sometimes it was necessary to change uni- 
forms among plavers when substitutions 
were made. But not today. 

Homecoming Activities 

Homecoming activities begin early in 
the morning. Registration is at 9 A.M. 
at the Rossborough Inn and the remainder 
of the forenoon will be for visiting the 



campus and seeing the new buildings. The 
fraternity and sorority houses have open 
house decorated in gala Homecoming fash- 
ion presenting a hospitable welcome to 
returning old grads. 

Just before lunch the historic Paint 
Branch will be the scene of another Sopho- 
more-Freshman Tug-o-war. Into the water 
will go one or the other, if the rope doesn't 
break. If the Frosh win, they shed the 
Soph's domination, but if the Sophs win 
another six weeks for freshman rules. So 
it is really a battle. Another event will be 
a cross country track meet with the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina. 

Returning grads will lunch between 12 
and 1 P.M. in the Dining Room of the 
Rossborough Inn. Then the strains of 
band music will jog their memories that 
game time approaches for the intersec- 
tional tilt between the Gators of Florida 
and the Terps of Maryland. The Florida 
bovs will be cheered on bv their own 60 
piece band and a cheering section of stu- 
dents, alumni, and Florida people. 

Float Parade 

At half-time a float parade sponsored 
by the student organizations will be pre- 
sented. This has always been a very color- 
ful spectacle. 



Following the game, the Annual "M" 
Club meeting will be held in the Univer- 
sity Library. At 5:30 P.M. the Annual 
Homecoming Mixer and Supper will begin 
in the Gymnasium. Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
Keller will be guests of honor and will be 
glad to meet fellow alumni and faculty. 
They will remain through the evening for 
the dance which will immediately follow 
the supper and continue until midnight. 
Two orchestras, in a battle of music, have 
been engaged for the dance. 

Frat-Sorority Open House 

Practically every fraternity and sorority 
are having open house on this dav. And 
in the evening a tea or supper will be held 
for their returning grads. 

For the convenience of the ladies, the 
Girl's Dorms are available with ample rest 
room facilities and here those desiring to 
make any changes in dress, which is not 
necessary, as every event is informal, may 
do so. 

The New Boys' Dormitories will be 
open for inspection and for the conveni- 
ence of old grads. Special accommodations 
for both men and women arc available in 
the University Gym. 

Homecoming, Saturday, October 28, is 
a day of gav festivities and no alumnus 
should miss it. 



Fund Trustees 
Hold Meeting 

Recently a meeting of the Alumni Fund 
Trustees was held in Baltimore at which 
time tentative plans for a program were 
made. The meeting was called to order 
by Dr. F. B. Bomberger, '94, Chairman. 
Others present were: W. D. Groff, '00; 
A. C. Diggs, 71; and L. G. Mathias, '23. 
President Charles W. Sylvester, '08; past- 
president C. Walter Cole, 71; and G. F. 
Pollock, '23, secretary, also attended the 
meeting. 

The first action taken was a motion 
passed to have the committee become an 
incorporated body. C. W. Cole was asked 
to draw up the papers. 



A tentative program was discussed and 
the following items will be reported on at 
the next meeting: Student Loan, Scholar- 
ship, Student-Alumni Union, Silvester 
Memorial Library, and County Group 
Funds. If the aforementioned items are 
made a part of the plan, it will provide 
an opportunity to designate for what pur- 
pose their contributions are to be used. 
• 

Married — On October 20, Edgar Rob- 
ert Kent, '34, a member of A.T.O. and 
Miss Marian Esther Mueller were married 
in Baltimore. Bob is in the air condition- 
ing business in Baltimore and rumors have 
it that the newlyweds are to reside in the 
Northvvood Apartments where several 
other Maryland Alumni can be found. 



Ice Cream — A recent visit by George 
Heinie, '25, a member of Kappa Alpha, 
revealed that he now is located as Manager 
of the Southern Dairies in Charlotte, 
North Carolina. George was on his way 
to the World's Fair. 
O 

Married — Elmer Clark Stevenson, '37, 
a member of Alpha Gamma Rho and 
Miss Margaret E. Hammers of Hood Col- 
lege, Frederick, Maryland, were married 
on September 1, 1939. Elmer is a gradu- 
ate assistant in Corn Pathology at the 
University of Wisconsin. Mr. and Mrs. 
Stevenson are secretaries of the Presby- 
terian Students in the University and are 
living in the student-owned church at 731 
State Street, Madison, Wisconsin. 



Maryland Alumni News 



Follow pur team 

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FOOTBALL FUN ALL SEASON 

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Beta Kappa Chapter 
Kappa Alpha To Celebrate 

As a part of the Homecoming day pro- 
gram the Beta Kappa chapter of the Kappa 
Alpha fraternity will hold their twenty- 
fifth anniversary of the installation of K. A. 
on the College Park campus. The chapter 
was originally Alpha Phi before becoming 
a chapter in K. A. Members of the original 
organization when they went national were 
J. B. Coster, W . T. Fletcher, J. B. Gray, 
Jr., R. T. Gray, and R. V. Truitt. Those 
of the present faculty who were members 
of the local order were Dr. T. H. Talia- 
ferro, Dr. L. B. Broughton, Dr. E. N. 
Cory, and Prof. Chas. S. Richardson. 

The chapter will have open house dur- 
ing the entire day and will finish off with 
a banquet at the chapter house following 
the football game. Letters have been sent 
out calling for the return of all old grads 
to a duel celebration, Homecoming and 
K. A.'s twenty-fifth anniversary in honor 
of the boys of old Alpha Phi. 



Birth — Dr. and Mrs. Taylor P. Rowe 
of Richmond, Virginia, announce the ar- 
rival of Ann Gayle, weighing five pounds, 
seven ounces, on September 19. Dr. 
Rowe, better known by his schoolmates as 
"Massa" is a member of Delta Sigma Phi, 
class of '25. "Massa's" occupation is that 
of veterinarian in Richmond. 



Engineering Jobs — There have been 
several calls received for engineers. If there 
is any one who might be interested in a 
change, please contact the Alumni or En- 
gineering Office at once. 



Teaching — Two graduates of the 1939 
class are teaching in Washington County. 
Miss Anna Estella Jennings is teaching at 
the Brownsville High School and Miss 
Anna Lee Hammond at the Cascade 
School. 

o 

Married — George Knepley, '39, the stel- 
lar first-sacker for the Terp nine, lets it be 
known that he is married and has been for 
some time. Mrs. Knepley is the former 
Miss Edith Wilson. 



RETIRES 




Those Alumni who return for Home- 
coming will miss a familiar face among the 
faculty roster, Prof. Chas. S. Richardson. 
After forty years of service, during which 
time he loyally and unselfishly gave his 
service in behalf of the College Park 
Schools of the University, Prof. Richard- 
son retires as a head of the Speech depart- 
ment. While he is no longer a member 
of the faculty his interest in the University 
causes him to frequently visit the campus. 
An Alumni event without "Chas. S." 
around would not seem natural, therefore, 
fellow Alumni you will not be disap- 
pointed as he has assured us of his presence 
on Saturday, October 28, the day for the 
Old Grads return. 

Alumni And "M" Club 
Hold Joint Meeting 

Following the opening football game a 
joint meeting of the Alumni and "M" 
Club Boards was held to make definite 
plans regarding Homecoming. 

There was a splendid attendance and 
everyone was very enthusiastic about the 
Homecoming plan. Both organizations 
are putting their shoulders to the wheel 
for the best Homecoming we have ever 
had. "Don" Adams, '29, President of the 
"M" Club and Charles W. Sylvester, '08, 
President of the Alumni, shared the hon- 
ors in leading the meeting. 

Every member said they would be pres- 
ent all day to help meet and greet old 
grads. 



A O Pi's Celebrate 
Fifteenth Anniversary 

Homecoming this year will be a double 
event for sisters of Alpha Omicron Phi. 
Their fifteenth birthday anniversary is 
October 25; and to the campus this marks 
fifteen years of national sororities, as A O 
Pi was the first to come to Maryland. 

At the time of installation, the charter 
members, headed by Betty Swenk, '25, 
met in the Ag Building in the textile lab 
of Mrs. Freda McFarland, their faculty 
member. The second year, a house was 
rented, and that was the beginning of 
sorority houses at Maryland. In 1929 the 
first of the present sorority houses was 
built on College Avenue by the A O Pi's. 
Students of the University, watching the 
progress of the building with interest, 
joked about the new hotel, for at that time 
thirty was an average number for fraternity 
groups. 

This year many alumni of Alpha O Pi 
are shining up their pins and reserving the 
week-end for renewing friendships and 
looking over the changes fifteen years have 
brought. A committee of the presidents 
of classes is planning a full week-end to 
supplement University Homecoming plans. 
Those who arrive Friday will have dinner 
and a show in town. On Saturday there 
will be local alumni at the chapter house 
to greet those who arrive then. After 
luncheon on the hill, and the game, there 
will be a tea dance and a buffet supper at 
the house for the girls and their husbands 
or dates. In the evening those who don't 
attend the Homecoming Dance in the 
gym will play cards at the house. 



Florida Sending Band 
And Cheering Section 

For the Homecoming tilt the University 
of Florida's students and alumni are send- 
ing their band and cheering section to 
College Park. Those of the Palmetto 
State are cheering their boys on for all 
the victories possible for Florida. 

The Florida State Society of Washing- 
ton are naturally taking an active interest 
in the Gators' visit to the Nation's Capital. 
Several hundred people are expected to at- 
tend the game in a body with the band 
leading them in the cheering. 



Maryland Alumni News 



The President's Message 

(Continued from Page 3; 

progress being made in each department of 
the University. We have much to be 
proud of at Maryland, our Alma Mater. 

Attend the Marvland-Florida Game at 
2:30 P.M. Root for Maryland to win, but 
win or lose, boost the team and support it. 
The games with Hampden-Sydney, West- 
ern Marvland and Virginia showed Mary- 
land to have a fine spirit and plenty of 
fight and speed galore After the game, join 
in the "Mixer," enjoy a fine buffet supper 
and visit with vour old friends. New ac- 
quaintances will be worth while, too. The 
dance at 9 P.M. will be an enjoyable af- 
fair for all. The Youth of the 1909 class 
will enjoy the affair fully as much as the 
boys and girls of 1939. Charlev Keller, our 
World Series hero will be the guest of 
honor. 

The University, in all its activities, needs 
the support of every Alumnus. Take off 
your coat, roll up your sleeves and go to 
work. Join the Alumni group or assist in 
forming local groups in all sections where 
such an organization is not now active. 
Tell us what we can do to help you in this 
venture. If Maryland is to go forward and 
become the kind of a University to which 
people of the State are entitled, you must 
aid the Board of Trustees and President 
Byrd in carrying out their plans. Our 
University should be just as fine as any 
other State University in America. We 
must provide for all our boys and girls who 
desire, who can afford and who can profit 
from a college education at the State 
University. 

Yours for a greater University, 

CHARLES W. SYLVESTER, 

President. 



Cadets — Bamett Broughton, son of Dr. 
L. B. Broughton, '08, has attained the 
rank of Colonel and head of the Wash- 
ington City High School Cadets brigade 

for 1939-40. 

o 

Law — Peter N. Chumbris, '35, now a 
graduate in law, announces his association 
with Walter M. Bastian and Albert F. 
Adams for the general practice of law. 
Offices are located in the National Press 
Building in Washington, D. C. 



Grapevine News About Those We Know 



Recovering — The News has received 
word that Merrick Wilson, '29, was quite 
ill during the summer but now is recov- 
ering nicely at his home in Engleside, 

Marvland. 

O 

Teaching — Wilson Dawson, '35, will be 
in charge of the manual training and agri- 
cultural department of the Jacob Tome In- 
stitute at Port Deposit, Maryland, this fall. 
He formerly taught in Caroline County. 
O 

F. B. I. — Another Marylander joining 
the Federal Bureau of Investigation is Jo- 
seph Peaslee, '39, winner of the Citizen- 
ship Honors for men last year. Joe also will 
be remembered for his cinder track contri- 
butions with the Terp squad. 


County Agent — Chester W. Cissell, '36, 
has been appointed Assistant County Agent 
in Oueen Anne's County. 



Married — Miss Mary Duke Warfield, 
'40, and Laurence L. Williams, '40, were 
recently married. Ralph I. Williams, '33, 
\ras best man. Among the ushers were Gus- 
tavus Warfield, '39. The newlyweds will 
make their home in Baltimore, where Lau- 
rence is in the department of occupational 
therapy of the Phipps Clinic at Johns Hop- 
kins Hospital. 



Lawyer — Hubert Arnold, '35, now is 
with the James Maxwell Fassett law firm 
in New York. He is located at 60 Wall 
Street. Arnold received his LL.B. last year 
from Duke University. 



Engaged — The engagement of Miss 
Gladys Virginia Johns, '37, and Mr. Walter 
Hamilton Armiger, '37, was announced 
at a lawn party at the home of Miss 
Johns this summer. 




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LORD BALTIMORE 




BALTIMORE 



MARYLAND 



October, 1939 



Old Line Athletic Contributions 



By W. H. ("Bill") HOTTEL: 



Terp-Gator Grid Game 
Should Be Thriller 

Old grads who return for the home- 
coming festivities on October 28 should 
see a close and highlv interesting football 
game between the Florida Gators and the 
Maryland Terps. Both travel much faster 
than their nicknames might indicate and 
appear certain to provide a wide-open 
battle. 

Florida will invade College Park with 
three victories and two defeats, the Ga- 
tors outstanding accomplishment being a 
~ to triumph over Boston College in the 
Hub City on October 12. It was a distinct 
upset. 

The Gator defeats, both by 12 to 
counts, came at the hands of the Univer- 
sity of Texas and Mississippi State, two of 
the South's leading teams and were no real 
blots on the Florida record. 

Terps Have Power 

Maryland, too, has been playing much 
good football with a squad that has the 
capabilities of "going to town," and the 
Terps should be ready for a real effort 
against the Gators. 

There is power in the Maryland line, 
with Bob Smith, center; George Lawrence, 
guard; and Ralph Albarano, tackle, being 
the bulwarks of the forward wall but 
others also have the "stuff" physically and 
all are fighters. (Continued on Page 10) 
• 

Maryland Tennis Pair 
Gets Another Title 

Allie Ritzenberg and Nathan Askin, 
Maryland's Southern Conference tennis 
champions, added another big crown when 
thev took the Mid-Atlantic honors in the 
recent tournev at White Sulphur Spring, 
West Va. 

Thev defeated Bill Rawlings and Walt 
Meserol of North Carolina in the final 
in four sets after dropping the opening set. 
The scores were, 1-6, 6-4, 6-3, 9-7. 

Ritzenberg reached the semi-finals in 
the singles where he was eliminated by 
Rawlings, who eventually took the champ- 
ionship. 



FLORIDA COACH 




ojosrf Coz>/ 

Genial mentor who has been tutoring 
the Gators for four years and who also is 
athletic director. While at Vanderbilt he 
was all-Southern tackle and later helped 
coach the Commodores. 

Game With Generals 
Still Is Uncertain 

Maryland has at least four more foot- 
ball games — possibly five — this season 
after the homecoming clash with the 
Florida Gators but the contest with Wash- 
ington and Lee still is hanging fire. 

If it is played at all, it likely will be on 
December 2 with the Baltimore Stadium 
as the scene. It was booked for November 
30, the original Thanksgiving Day. but 
when turkev day was shifted to November 
23, it messed up matters. 

Here are the other tilts: 

November 4 — Penn State at State Col- 
lege. 

November 11 — Georgetown at Griffith 
Stadium, Washington. 

November 18 — V.M.I, at Norfolk 
(Va.) Stadium. 

November 23 — Syracuse at College 
Park at 11 A.M. 

There are SI. 10 and S1.65 seats for all 
games. 



1 91 4 Football Stars 
Will Be Honored 

Letter winners of the football squad of 
1914 will be the guests of honor at the 
Terp-Gator grid game at Homecoming on 
October 28 at College Park. 

President II. C. Bvrd was serving his 
third season as coach of the Terps that 
year, E. W. Montell was manager and 
J. Edwin Bovvland, captain. 

Here is the way The Reveille, the year 
book, listed the starting line-up: 

Coggins, left end; Oberlin, left tackle; 
Tarbutton, left guard; Aitcheson, center; 
Kishpaugh, right guard; Bovvland, right 
tackle; Pennington, right end; Knode, 
quarterback; Carter or Derrick, left half 
back; Mess, right halfback; Hindman, full- 
back. 

That there were "iron men" in those 
days was testified to by the fact that only 
a dozen letters were awarded. 

Maryland (then the Aggies) won over 
Hopkins, 14 0; Washington College, 3 0; 
and St. John's, 10 0; but lost to Western 
Maryland, 13-20. 

Catholic U., 6-0, and Penn Military, 
26-0, were among other teams defeated. 

Mess kicked a field goal with six seconds 
to plav to win the Washington College 
game. 

It is hoped and expected that a great 
majority of them will be on hand. 



Freshmen Play Well 
Although Beaten 

Maryland's freshman football team, 
coached bv Al Woods, former Terp star, 
did well in its first game, although it was 
defeated bv the George Washington year- 
lings, 21 to 6. 

The voung Colonials, boasting a squad 
of varsity proportions, simply were too 
good for the baby Terps. 

Maryland's frosh squad, as usual, is 
made up mainly of nearby State and Dis- 
trict of Columbia vouths. 



S 



Maryi. 



''umni News 







EVENING SrA«,M/ASH(MS7bAl X>.C 



TARZANOFTHE YANKS*-- 
THE UNIVEESITV DF/MARyLAMD 
Boy WHO, IN HIS FIRST YEAR 

asa major-leaguer., was 
the slugging star of the 
world series witt* a .438 
average, he Topped both 
clubs in ajumber of hits 
home runs, runs scored' 
and runs patted in 



This cartoon ivas made 
available through the 
courtesy of The Wash- 
ington Star and Jim 
Berryman, the nation- 
ally known artist, who 
drew it. 



Kellers Will Be Honor Guests at Homecoming, October 28 



Cluulev Keller, University of Maryland's 

sensational gift to the New York Yankees, 
and the hero and star of their victory over 
the Cincinnati Reds in the 4-game rout in 
the recent world series, and Mrs. Keller, 
will be guests of honor at the Homecom- 
ing festivities on October 28. 

Mrs. Keller, who also attended Mary- 
land as a freshman and sophomore, was 
Martha Williamson of Baltimore. The 
■Kellers, who have a voung son, now are 
living in Frederick. 

October, 193H. 



Eventually Will Be Farmer 
Charley, who went into professional 
baseball in the Spring of his senior year, 
l l )s _ . came back after that season and got 
his degree in Agricultural Economics and 
when his plaving davs are over — a long 
time hence, we hope — intends to settle 
down on a farm near his native Middle- 
town, Md. 

He spent two years at Newark in the 
International League, which he led in bat- 
ting both seasons, before going up to the 



Yankees, and now he is rated the outstand- 
ing rookie in the major leagues. 

Char-lie, who batted .438 and got three 
home runs, led the Yankee assualt against 
the Reds, and was responsible for 11 of 
their 17 runs, scoring the winning tallv 
in the opener after hitting a triple. He 
batted .336 in the regular campaign to be 
second to Joe DiMaggio on the Yankee 
team . 

Keller has feted at man}' places since his 
world series feats and was the guest of the 



Maryland student bodv on October 19 
when he reviewed the Terps' fine R.O.T.C. 
brigade. 

Still Modest, Bashful 

He's still almost as bashful as when he 
reported to Maryland as a freshman and 
is considerably fussed over all of the honors 
paid him. He certainly is a credit to the 
University and to the great national 
pastime. 

Keller, who also took a crack at football 
in his frosh year and starred as a basketball 
guard for three seasons, showed to be a 
baseball star in the making as a' yearling, 
and under the tutelage of Burton Shiplev 
in his two years on the Varsity ironed out 
the rough spots that made him a big 
leaguer. 

THREE FROSH TILTS LEFT 

Maryland's freshmen gridders still have 
three more games to plav, as follows: 

October 28— V.M.I. Frosh at Lexing- 
ton. 

November 10 — Georgetown Frosh at 
Washington. 

November 18 — U. S. Naval Training 
Station at Norfolk, Va. 
• 

Cross Country Teams 
Register Clean-Up 

Maryland's cross country team got off 
to a flying start by defeating Virginia and 
Washington and Lee in a triangular meet 
at Charlottesville October 14. Jim Kehoe, 
Tommv Fields and Mason Chronister, all 
Terps, tied for first, with Randall Cronin 
twelfth and Dick Sullivan thirteenth. 

Maryland's freshmen also scored with 
Kihm, Devlin and Gross running first, 
second and fourth, respectively. Matthews 
and Merriken were the other Terps to 
complete the team score. 

In the varsity meet, in which low score 
wins, Maryland had 31 points, Virginia 
•41 and Washington and Lee 48. 

The leading two set a record for the diffi- 
cult four-mile course — 8 21:29. 

Terp-Gator Grid Game 

(Continued from Page 8) 
Pershing Mondorff, a scintillating all- 
around back; Mearlc DuVall, one of the 
finest passers anywhere and who has other 
assets; and Joe Murphy, fleet 153 pounder, 
lead a backfield that packs enough speed 



MARYLAND SONGS 

for Homecoming 



VICTORY SONG 

Down on the field they're fighting, 

Pride of the Black and Gold, 

Men, every one of them, 

Warriors of U. of M„ our honor they'll uphold. 

On toward the goal they're marching; 

It will not take them long, 

So, let's give a cheer 

For the men we hold dear, and sing to them our Victory Song. 

CHORUS 

Maryland, we're all behind you; Wave high the Black and Gold, 

For there is nothing half so glorious — As to see our men victorious; 

We've got the team, boys, We've got the steam, boys 

So keep on fighting, don't give in! 

SHOUT 

MARYLAND (Sing) Maryland will win! 
U. OF M. 
U. of M., U. of M., Keep the ball away from them, 
Keep that pigskin a rolling along! 

Up the field, down the field, Not an inch of ground we'll yield; 
Keep that pigskin a rolling along! 

Then it's WHIFF! WHAM! WHACK! Hear that Mar'land quarter-back 
Shout out his signals loud and strong! 
Where'er you go, You will always know, That that pigskin is rolling along. 

SONS OF OLD MARYLAND 

Sons of old Maryland 
Old Maryland needs vou! 
Stand by your colors, boys, 
And to them e'er be true! 
light for old Maryland 
Old Liners! Stand, 
Defenders of the Black and Gold 
Throughout the land. 



YELL 



M-M-MARY 

L-LLAND 

Mary 

Land 

Fight-Team-Fight. 



and power to worry any defense. 
Florida Team Young 

Florida has a young, ambitious and fiery 
squad that is made up of 23 sophomores, 
14 juniors and only three seniors and, 
naturally, is improvi'ig as the season goes 
along. 

Maryland will be battling to get on even 
terms in their eighth meeting with the 



Gators, as Florida has won four of the past 
seven tilts, the record being as fo ows: 
1927— Florida, 7; U. of V 6 
1932— Florida, 19; U. of M 



1934— U. of V 
1935— T I. of V 
1936 — Horida, , , 
1937_U. of M., • 
1938— Florida, 21; 



FV 



10 



Maryla 




C. W. Sylvester. '08 
Alumni President 

Aft 



Sixteenth 

Annual 

Homecoming 



SATURDAY 

OCTOBER 

28, 1939 



College Park, Md. 




Donald Adams, '28 
"M" Club President 






THE PROGRAM 



9 A.M. Alumni registration. Rossborough Inn 
10 A.M. Coed tennis play off. Girl's Tennis Courts 

10 A.M.-l P.M. Campus sightseeing. Tours of Col- 

lege Park to see decorated frat houses 

1 1 A.M. Annual Freshman-Sophomore Tug-O-War. 

Paint Branch 

11:45 A.M. Cross Country — Maryland vs. North 
Carolina 

12 to 1 P.M. Alumni Buffet Luncheon. Rossborough 

Inn 

1 P.M. Judges' inspection of fraternity and sorority 
house decorations 



2 P.M. Band parades by Florida and Maryland 

2:30 P.M. Football — Maryland vs. Florida 

Reserved seats S1.65. General admission SI. 10 

3:30 P.M. Float parade at half time 

5 P.M. Annual "M" Club meeting. University 
Library 

5:30 P.M. Alumni Mixer, Buffet Supper and Dance. 
Special Entertainment. Dancing until 12 mid- 
night, two well-known orchestras furnishing the 
music. University Gymnasium, SI. 25 per person. 
Alumni, faculty and friends invited 

9 P.M. to 12 Dancing SI. 10 per couple for those 
who did not attend the dinner. University Gym. 



Fraternity and Sorority houses are to be decorated in gala Homecoming fashion, giving emphasis to hospitality 
and i real "Old Line" welcome. All will have open house during the day with special events, following the 
game, for their returning grads. 

A) ^i;i Gar? 1 Rho. Alpha Tau Omega, Delta Sigma Phi. Kappa Alpha, Lambda Chi Alpha, Phi Sigma Kappa. 
Pin ., Sigma Nu, Sigma >'iii Sigma. Theta Chi. Alpha Omicron Phi, Alpha \i Delta. Kappa Kappa 

C- a Delta. Delta Delta Delta. 



mi who desire over-night accommodations, communicate with the Alumni secretary. The reservations 
je as neai tlv .npus as possible and reasonable. 



vu W annm 




FORI REAL MILDNESS 





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for better taste. With their right combination 
of the World's best cigarette tobaccos they give 
millions more smoking pleasure. 

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Copyright 1939, Liggett & Mitrs Tobacco '.o. 




ALUMNI 
NEWS 



NOVEMBER 
1939 



•H CO 




Homecoming A Big Success; 
Many Old Grads Return 



It was in 1923 when Byrd Stadium was 
officially opened and dedicated that the 
Homecoming event had its initial begin- 
ning. Since then it has been an annual af- 
fair when the favorite gridiron pasttime 
draws sport lovers back to the campus for 
a day of recreation and frivolity. 

This year drew probably the greatest 
Homecoming crowd we ever had and the 
spirit and display of hospitality by the stu- 
dents drew many laudatory comments from 
returning old grads and visitors. The cus- 
tom seems to be gaining in momentum and 
from one year to the next the crowd in- 
creases. 

Houses Decorated 

Each fraternity and sorority had open 
house and all reported a large return. Dec- 
orations added to their welcome as well as 
giving much color to the festivities of the 
day. Theta Chi and Alpha Xi Delta won 
first prize for fraternities' and sororities' 
decorations, respectively. Charles W. Syl- 
vester, '08, president of the Alumni Asso- 
ciation, headed the judging committee for 
house decorations, with H. C. Whiteford, 
'01, H. M. Costor, '09, Mrs. C. Walter 
Cole, and Miss Edith Ball as his members. 

The festivities of the day began with 
registration at the Rossborough Inn, where 
the traditions of the Old Building, recently 
restored, caused much reminiscing to take 
place. 

Sophs Win 

At 11 A. M. the annual tug-of-vvar be- 
tween the sophomores and freshmen was 
staged at Paint Branch, with the Sophs re- 
taining their supremacy by drenching the 
yearling boys. 

Later, the Tar Heels of North Carolina 
and the Terrapins of Maryland held a cross- 
country race, with the latter being victo- 
rious. Kehoe, Chronister, and Fields fin- 
ished abreast for first place in fast time. 

Noontime found the old grads enjoying 
lunch in the dining room of the Inn. 

At 2:30 P. M. the highlight of the day 
was a football game between the 'Gators 
of Florida and the Maryland Terps, but 
for the Terps did not end well. At 
half time various student organizations pre- 



sented a float parade which was very col- 
orful. Despite a high wind the students 
stuck to their guns and came through. 
Kappa Delta, Women's A. A., and Sigma 
Alpha Mu won silver cups for the best 
floats. Judges were the Honorable W. P. 
Cole, TO, Hon. J. Milton Patterson, Hon. 
Emanuel Gorfine, and Hon. Millard Tawes. 

Following the game the crowd scattered 
to the many fraternity and sorority houses 
and the Mixer in the Gym. After appe- 
tites were appeased, the Annual Home- 
coming Dance in the Gym was on, with 
a battle of music between Watson Powell 
and Don Lane of Washington. A large 
crowd of Alumni were on hand and the 
successful day drew to a close at midnight. 

Partial list of those present, as many 
came later and did not register: 

1888— H. B. McDonnell, College Park; H. 
J. Patterson, College Park. 

1891— Warren L. Dent, Washington. D. C. 

1893— H. T. Harrison, College Park. 

1895— P. C. Prough, Sykesville, Md.; Ro- 
land L. Harrison, Arlington, Va.. 

1896— W. T. S. Rollins, Washington, D. C. 

1898— J. Hanson Mitchell, Baltimore, Md. 

1900— Wm. S. Graff. Owings Mills, Md.; 
Harry Kefauver. Frederick, Md. 

1901— H. C. Whiteford, Whiteford, Md. 

1902— T. B. Symons. College Park. 

1903— E. P. Walls, College Park; Edgar B. 
Fredenwald. Baltimore, Md.. 

1904— A. W. Valentine, Washington, D. C; 
A. Parker, Pocomoke City, Md. 

1905— Clay P. Whiteford, Whiteford, Md. 

1906— Geo. W. Dorr, Washington, D. C. 

1907— Wm. Bowland, McDonogh, Md. 

1908— W. LeGore. LeGore, Md.; G. C. Day, 
Baltimore, Md.; Lois S. Ashman. Baltimore, 
Md.; Urah N. Long, Selbyville, Del.; Chas. 
N. Sylvester, Baltimore. Md. 

1909— Wm. R. Maslin, Port Chester, N. Y.; 
Martin M. Hihn. Washington, D. C; Dr. Al- 
len Griffith, Berwyn; H. M. Coster, Indian 
Head. 

1910— Wm. P. Cole, Towson. Md.; Dr. John 
Donaldson, Washington, D. C.; Victor Ben- 
nett, University of Maryland; H. H. Allen, 
Baltimore, Md.; O. H. Saunders, Fort How- 
ard, Md.; Sydney Stabler, Hyattsville. Md. 

1911— Roland H. Willis, Riverdale, Md.; C. 

A. Chaney, Washington, D. C; O. R. An- 
drews, Anderson, Md. 

1912— W. A. Furst, Pittsburgh, Pa; Herman 
Badenhoop, Baltimore, Md.; W. B. Kemp, 
College Park. 

1913— E. E. Powell, Towson, Md. 

1914 — Frank S. Hoffecker, Sparrows Point, 
Md.; R. V. Truit, Campus; J. Ben Robinson, 
D.D.S.. Baltimore. Md. 

1915— Richard Dale. Towson. Md.; Robert 
J. McCutcheon. Braddock Heights, Md. 

1916— L. E. Bopst, College Park; Whitney 
J. Aitcheon, Laurel, Md. 

1917— Robert W. Mess, Washington, D. C; 

B. Dubel, Quantico, Va.; Crown O. Diehl, 
D.D.S.. Hagerstown, Md. 

1918— O. H. Gaver. Baltimore, Md.; Mal- 
vern Rieh, Short Hills, N. J. 

1919— Howard O. Coster. Washington, D. 
C; James W. Stevens. Baltimore, Md. 

1920— J. Kievde. Washington, D. C: Peter 
W. Chichester, Frederick. Md.; Clarence C. 
Crippin, Hurlock, Md.; Geo. W. Clendaniel, 
Denton, Md. 

(Continued on Page 9) 



Alumni of Maryland: 

Our Annual Homecoming is now a mat- 
ter of history, but it will long be remem- 
bered. It was one of the finest and best 
attended affairs that has ever been given. 
It was a pleasure to cooperate with the 
"M" Club in arranging the program of 
the day, and we all appreciate the spirit 
and enthusiasm which was shown by the 
student body. 

The next big event is the Charter Day 
Banquet on January 20 in the Calvert Ball- 
room of the Lord Baltimore Hotel. Dr. 
Daniel F. Lynch, a prominent dentist of 
Washington, has been selected to serve as 
general chairman. Dr. T. B. Aycock of Bal- 
timore is the general vice-chairman. Com- 
mittees have been appointed and are al- 
ready at work to make this another record- 
breaking event. We expect to have a na- 
tionally prominent speaker for this occa- 
sion. Although the date is two months 
away, every Alumnus is urged to make 
plans to be present in Baltimore this year. 
Only with the full cooperation and sup- 
port of the Alumni Association, can we 
hope to surpass former banquets. 

There was a record-breaking crowd in 
the Byrd Stadium for the Maryland-Flor- 
ida game on Homecoming Day. Our Ter- 
rapins showed plenty of spirit and fight 
but, unfortunately, the score was not to 
our liking. Let us continue to support 
Maryland as we did at that game. They 
are meeting some very strong teams and 
need all the encouragement we can give 
them as they battle up and down the grid- 

iron - Sincerely, 

Charles W. Sylvester, President. 

Bureau of Mines 

(Continued from Page 3) 
The lectures are held on the fourth 
Tuesday evening of October, November, 
February, March and April. These speakers 
are outstanding members of the staff of 
the Bureau, selected because of broad and 
varied experience in fields of wide technical 
and public interest, involving fundamental 
and pioneering research. Although the lec- 
tures are arranged in connection with the 
new work of the University in chemical 
engineering, they cover a broad field of 
science, technology, and economics. There 
is no charge for admission. The general 
public is cordially invited. 



Maryland Alumni News 



Besley, '23, Elected 
President Of "M" Club 

When the smoke cleared at the annual 
meeting of the "M" Club, held Home- 
coming Day, the Hon. A. Kirkland Besley, 
'23, "Kirk" to many of you — was president 
of the letter men's organization. Now the 
smoke was not about Kirk. It was quite an 
interesting meeting and one of the best 
attended in seYeral years. 

Besley's assisting officers are James W. 
Stevens, '19, a former lacrosse star and 
now a produce commission broker of Bal- 
timore, and Dr. E. N. Cory, '09, former 
captain of the 1908 football squad, was 
re-elected secretary-treasurer. 

Going back to the days before Besley 
graduated, manv will remember the young, 
bashful and modest lad who was found as 
a baseball plaYer on an intramural team. 
Persuaded to come out for the Yarsity 
squad, in no time he had a regular berth 
at shortstop. Then it was found out he 
was fast and football attracted his atten- 
tion. A fleet-footed quarterback he turned 
out to be. His remarkable achievements 
in directing the team will be long remem- 
bered by his team mates and fellow stu- 
dents. 

He resides near the campus, takes an 
active interest in the athletic developments 
and will undoubtedly carry on as in the 
days of old where his predecessor, Don 
Adams, '28, left off. Other members elect- 
ed are found on page 3. 



Livestock And Dairy 
Building Dedicated 

Last month the new buildings of the 
Livestock and Dairy Departments of the 
University were dedicated before an au- 
dience of nearly two thousand visiting 
farmers of Maryland. A picture of the 
buildings is shown on the front cover page 
of this issue of the News. 

An elaborate program was held during 
the forenoon when some of the Univer- 
sity's prize stock were put on display. Many 
people visited and inspected the new build- 
ings. With the completion of the build- 
ings Maryland was placed among the best- 
( Continued on Page 10) 



O. D. K. 




Gov. Herbert R. O'Conor, '20 

Gov. O'Conor, '20 
Tapped By O.D.K. 

Governor O'Conor and four student 
leaders were pledged to Omicron Delta 
Kappa, national leadership fraternity, at 
the University. 

The four tapped for membership were 
Douglas Steinberg, College Park, club lead- 
er and business manager of The Diamond- 
back, student newspaper; Joe Murphy, Car- 
ney's Point, N. J., star trackman; Merle 
Preble, College Park, cadet colonel of the 
R. O. T. C, and Frank Davis, Poolesville, 
Md., president of the junior class. 

In an address on leadership, the Gov- 
ernor referred to a recent court ruling that 
a teacher cannot force a student to salute 
the American flag, and said: 

"As long as organizations such as Omi- 
cron Delta Kappa play such a prominent 
role on your campus the University of 
Maryland does not need laws to compel its 
student body to stand up for what is right 
in life and for the tradition of the country." 

• 
Virginia — Roy C. Meinzer, '38, a grad- 
uate engineer, now is located in Norfolk, 
Virginia, at 1712 Hampton Boulevard. 



Lynch, '25, D.D.S., Heads 
Charter Day Committee 

Definite plans are already underway for 
the Annual Charter Day Celebration of 
the beginning of our University, Saturday, 
January 20, 1940, in Baltimore, Maryland. 

Dr. Daniel F. Lynch, '25, D.D.S., a 
specialist in Washington, D. G, and a 
former associate of the famous Mayo Clin- 
ic, was chosen general chairman of the 
Alumni Organization Committee. The 
presidents of the Alumni organizations of 
the University, Dr. Arthur Hebb of Medi- 
cine, Dr. Harry Kelsey of Dentistry, Dr. 
Charles Austin of Pharmacy, the Hon. 
John E. Magers, '14 of Law, Miss Bessie 
Maston of Nursery, and Mr. Charles W. 
Sylvester, '08, of the College Park School, 
met with the subcommittee of the Univer- 
sity's Public Function Committee, headed 
by Dr. J. Ben Robinson, '14, D.D.S., Dr. 
E. N. Cory, '09, Dr. T. B. Symons, '02, 
and G. F. Pollock, '23, to set up the or- 
ganization committee. 

Assistant to Dr. Lynch, and general vice- 
chairman, is Dr. Thomas B. Aycock, '24, 
M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery at the 
University Hospital. 

Other committee chairmen are to be 
chosen and will be named in the next is- 
sue of the Alumni News. 

This annual celebration is attracting 
considerable interest and much emphasis 
is being given to preparations. General 
County Committees are being arranged 
and the attendance is expected to test the 
capacity of the Lord Baltimore Hotel. 
Write early for your reservation to Mr. W. 
M. Hillegeist, '12, Baltimore, Maryland, 
or the Alumni Office at College Park. 

A general meeting of committees will 
be held the first part of December to get 
all phases well ironed out before the hol- 
idays. It is sure that the Program Commit- 
tee will arrange a brief and concise pro- 
gram of few speeches, good entertainment. 
Dancing will follow the banquet to the 
music of a well-known orchestra. Plans are 
to begin the banquet at 7 o clock promptly, 
so make arrangements to be present early. 

Don't forget the date — Saturday, Jan- 
uary 20, 1940, at the Lord Baltimore Ho- 
tel in Baltimore. 

© 

Died — Dr. Leroy MacMurray, D.D.S., 
'14, died last July. He was a practicing den- 
tist in Fernando, Florida. 



November, 1939 



5 



Alumni Gather After 
Rutgers Game 

Following the Rutgers football game, 
many Alumni from New York, Pennsyl- 
vania, and New Jersey gathered at the 
Roger Smith Hotel in New Brunswick to 
swap comments and get acquainted. 

The gathering was sponsored by the 
New York group, of which James E. Ding- 
man, '21, is president. He was ably assisted 
by Don Kieffer, '30, Fred Rakeman, T8, 
Malcolm Rich, '22, Sarah Morris, '25 and 
Lyman Oberlin, '16. 

All of the names on the committee are 
not known to the writer, therefore, they 
have not been intentionally omitted. 

More than one hundred old and young 
grads were present for this occasion. As 
Maryland now is scheduling athletic con- 
tests with Rutgers, more gatherings will 
take place in New Brunswick. 

Carr And Don 
Entertain For Old Grads 

Entertainment for returning old grads 
was generously presented by Carr Van 
Sickler and Don Shook, both of '27, now 
known as Carr and Don of the Madril- 
lon Cafe of Washington. They lead an 
orchestra of their own with a piano duet. 
Stop by and see them, as Marylanders are 
always welcome. 

Others to take part in the entertainment 
were Professor and Mrs. Harlan Randall 
in a duet. Professor Randall is director of 
music on the campus. Some of Professor 
Randall's proteges, the Glee Club Quartet, 
composed of Bill Arnold, Milton Cole, 
Jake Powell, and Charles Bechtold, gave a 
very entertaining selection of harmony 
numbers. 

Following the entertainment, dancing 
began and the battle of music between the 
dance orchestras was on. 



DINING HALL 

The Dining Hall improvements are rap- 
idly approaching the point of completion. 
The new furniture has arrived, which is 
very attractive. 

With the enlargement of the building 
a spacious dining hall is now available and 
the staggered lunch hour will probably be 
eliminated during the next semester. 



Keller Feted 
Many Times 



Charley Keller. '37, World Series hero, 
was feted several times when he returned 
to Maryland soil. His home-town folks of 
Middletown held a homecoming party for 
him. 

The citizens of Frederick held quite an 
elaborate banquet in his honor, of which 
Dr. H. C. Byrd, a former baseball star 
himself, and for many years a coach, was 
the principal speaker. Many notables in 
baseball and sports writers were among 
those to shower words of praise upon the 
Maryland hero. H. B. Shipley, '14, Keller's 
coach at Maryland, and J. Homer Rems- 
berg, '18, Principal of Middletown High 
School, when Keller started to plav, also 
spoke about the World Series hero. Gifts 
from prominent business houses in Fred- 
erick were presented to Charley at the ban- 
quet. 

Many University of Maryland Alumni 
were present at the banquet, headed by 
Charles W. Sylvester, "08, Peter W. Chi- 
chester, '21, and G. F. Pollock, '23. 

A week later Keller Day was held by 
the student body, at which time Charley 
was the honored guest at a special lunch- 
eon which was followed by a regimental 
review. 

At the conclusion of the review the pre- 
sentation of a trophy on behalf of the 
student body was made by Tom Coleman, 
president. 

Charley returned again to the campus 
for the annual Homecoming. 

Many words of praise and laudatory com- 
ments have been written and spoken about 
the former Terp which he fully deserves. 
We all wish for Charley continued success 
in his chosen profession. 



AT PENN STATE GAME 

When the Terps visited the Nittany 
Lions at Penn State, several Alumni drop- 
ped around the dressing room to say hello 
and wish the team success. First was Tom 
Holder, '22, now located at Rochester, N. 
Y. Then came Frank Hoffecher, Jr., '35, 
now with the Republic Steel at Youngs- 
town, Ohio. Both came quite a distance 
to see the boys in action and, despite the 
loss of the game, they enjoyed seeing the 
fellows. 



Teaching — Two graduates of the 1939 
class are teaching in Washington County. 
Miss Anna Estella Jennings is teaching at 
the Brownsville High School and Miss 
Anna Lee Hammond at the Cascade 
School. 

O 

Wedding — Mrs. Raymond A. Pearson, 
widow of Dr. R. A. Pearson, former Pres- 
ident of our University, announces the mar- 
riage of her daughter, Ruth, to Mr. LeRov 
Eakin, Jr., on Saturday, November 4th last, 
at Avon, New York. 



Rumors — Heard and Seen — There is a 
rumor on the campus about the Mercer- 
Miller combination. Frequently they have' 
been seen together, Virginia and Alan. 
Now as to rumors concerning campus ro- 
mances, vou can make vour own deduc- 
tions. However, Alan is a senior but Vir- 
ginia is a sophomore and naturally edu- 
cation will come first. Anyway, it's news. 



Cooperative — Should anyone ask how 
well is Maryland represented in the South- 
ern States Cooperative, here you are. In 
Baltimore, E. Wavne Fitzwater, '39. 



Aviation — A show and a visit was made 
at College Park recently by Bill Theis, now 
a flying officer in the Naval Air Corps. Bill 
flew over the campus, did some turns and 
twists and gave the boys a treat of what a 
plane can do. At present he is stationed at 
Norfolk. Virginia, but is expected to fly to 
the Pacific Coast soon. With him he takes 
a wife. 



Teaching — June Weber, '39, now is a 
teacher at the Powell Junior High School 
in Washington. June is a member of Tri 
Delt. 



Married — John J. Gormlev, '37, now 
Lieutenant Gormlev, U. S. Marine Corps, 
and Miss Harriett McCall were married 
this summer. Mrs. Gormlev is the daugh- 
ter of Dr. and Mrs. A. G. McCall of Col- 
lege Park. 



Maryland Alumni News 



Lectures On Engineering 
1939-40 

Dean S. S. Steinberg of the College of 
Engineering of the University of Maryland 
announces the following program of Lec- 
tures on Engineering for the first semester 
of the academic year 1939-40. These lec- 
tures arc given each Tuesday at 11:20 A. 
M., in the Engineering Auditorium. 

All students, members of the faculty, 
and the public are invited to attend. 
Nov. 28 — "Some of the Engineering and 
Construction Aspects of the Pennsyl- 
vania Turnpike," Major II. H. Allen, 
vice-president, J. E. Greiner Co., Con- 
sulting Engineers. Baltimore, Md. 
Dec. 5— "The Value to Me of My En- 
gineering Training," His Excellency, 
Radii Irimescu, Rumanian Minister 
to the United States. 
Dec. 12 — "Recent Progress in Meteorol- 
ogv," Commander F. W. Reichelder- 
fer, Chief, U. S. Weather Bureau, 
Washington, D. C. 
fan. 2 — "Electric Power in the Steel In- 
dustry," F. O. S'chnure, Electrical Su- 
perintendent, Bethlehem Steel Co., 
Sparrows Point, Md. 
Jan. 9 — "Safety in Engineering Opera- 
tions," W. T. Cameron, Chief Safety 
Advisor, Division of Labor Standards, 
U. S. Department of Labor, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 
Jan. 16 — "Some Experiences of a Con- 
tractor," E. J. Dougherty, president, 
Emipre Construction Co., Baltimore, 
Md. 

• 

History Talks Given 
On European War 

History department staff members will 
present a series of lectures on the Euro- 
pean conflict in the Home Economics Lec- 
ture Room at 4:30 P. M. 

A list of scheduled lectures follows: 
Nov. 28 — "The Russian Enigma," Dr. Le- 
onid Strakhovskv. 
Dec. 12 — "America's Historic Policv of 
Neutrality," Dr. Hayes Baker-Croth- 
ers. 
Jan. 9 — "Present-Day American Neutral- 
ity, " Dr. Harold Thatcher. 
Jan. 16 — "The United States and Pan- 
American Neutrality," Dr. Donald 
Dozer. 



Rossborough Inn 
Furniture Wanted 



Antique furniture needed for the Rossborough Inn. All items prior to 1810, unless 
otherwise stated. 

Work is progressing toward the furnishing of the Rossborough Inn with period 
furniture. It is felt that many Alumni will have or know about a piece of antique furni- 
ture which they would like to loan or give for the Inn. Therefore, for your convenience, 
a list of the pieces which are desired are listed below. Any Alumnus who is interested in 
this restoration process who has or knows about any of the furniture desired, please 
communicate with the Alumni Office. 

Grandfather's clock. 

One-half dozen ladderback chairs in pairs ( 3 to 4 slats). 

Three or four odd ladderback chairs ( 3 to 4 slats ) . 

Several mahoganv, walnut and cherry chests of drawers. 

Several walnut and pine blanket chests. 

Three small, square-legged stands, in mahoganv and walnut. 

One square- or turned-legged card table, in mahogany. 

Three high-post beds, in hardwood (post not over 3 inches thick). 

One Sheraton gilt mirror. 

Two walnut or mahoganv side or serving tables. 

One Sheraton fancy settee and two similar chairs. 

Old books printed in Marvland, or about Maryland, before 1830. 

Old deeds of land in Prince George's County and Mankind. 

Several bowback and combback Windsor chairs. 

Low-post, soft or hardwood beds, with posts not over 3 inches thick. 

One secretary desk (slant-top type). 

One walnut or cherry corner cupboard (not over 36 inches from corner). 

China and glassware, not later than 1830 (before 1800 preferred). 

Large and small pewter plates, tea pots, bowls and candlesticks. 

Brass and silver candlesticks with oval or square bases. 

One flintlock Kentucky- rifle. 

One old violin (veneered fingerboard). 

Flower prints and hunting prints, also early maps of Maryland. 

One hour glass. 

One liquor tester. 

Several silhouettes (preferably of Marvland people). 

Two oil portraits of Marvland origin. 

One barometer. 

Lanterns of all tvpes, as well as whale oil lamps. 

Several candle moulds (large and small). 

"Tally-Ho" horn, English type of copper or tin. 

Brace of pistols (flintlocks). 

Child's clothing and dolls. 

Several stools, in any kind of wood. 

Four foot-scrapers (scroll tvpe). 

Four stake lanterns. 

Five pairs of brass andirons. 

Four pairs of wrought iron andirons. 

Two serpentine low-tvpe fenders in brass. 

Six pairs of jamb hooks for fireplaces. 

Two bed warmers. 

Wine glasses, rummers, flip glasses. 

Pottery, brass and pewter ink wells and quill pens. 

Clay pipes (mostly made in Scotland.) 

One wrought iron strong box (pirate treasure chest). 

Any other items from Maryland that would be of interest. 



November, 1939 



Old Line Athletic Contributions 



By W. H. ("Bill") HOTTEL: 



Thanksgiving Grid Game 
Makes Terp History 

Maryland staged a unique football game, 
for it, when it lost a hot 10-to-7 battle to 
Syracuse at College Park on Thanksgiving 
Day ( November 23). 

Losing the Washington and Lee game, 
originally slated for the original Thanks- 
giving Day (November 30) in Baltimore, 
through President Roosevelt's action in set- 
ting back the holidav one week, Maryland 
plavcd its first Turkev Dav game in its 
history on its home field. 

The Terps have played many times on 
Thanksgiving Dav, including the long and 
great series with Johns Hopkins, but always 
on foreign fields. 

Many Parents Expected 

The game was set for the morning so 
that the students would stay over. 

While neither team has measured up to 
expectations this year, they appear well 
matched and as both will be "shooting the 
works" in the finale, thev should offer good 
holidav entertainment. 

The Terps and Orange were plaving 
their fifth annual game and the seventh in 
their football history with Syracuse. 

In their first meeting in 1920, Maryland 
sprang a stunning upset, one of the biggest 
of the entire season by defeating Syracuse, 
10 to 7, but the Orange vented its spleen 
on the Terps the next season to the tune 
of 42 to 0. 

Start New Series In 1935 

That ended their grid battles until 1935 
when the present series, which comes to 
a close November 23, began. They played 
a tie in 1935 and Maryland, after winning 
in 1936 and 1937, took a crippled eleven 
to Syracuse last fall and was given a wal- 
loping. 

Gearv Epplev. Marvland's athletic di- 
rector, played end, and Rov Mackert, head 
of the Physical Education Department, was 
at fullback in the 1920 triumph, while 
Rosy Pollock, Alumni secretary, was one 
of those to feel the sting of that 1921 de- 
feat. 



Here are the results of the past six 
games: 

1920— Maryland State, 10; Syracuse, 7. 
1921— Syracuse, 42; U. of Maryland, 0. 
1935 — Maryland, 0; Syracuse, 0. 
1936— Maryland, 20; Syracuse, 0. 
1937 — Maryland, 13; Syracuse, 0. 
1938— Syracuse, 53; Maryland, 0. 



Terp Eleven Beaten 
By V. M. |. # 13-0 

Maryland took a trip to Norfolk Novem- 
ber 18 to add another tilt to the long series 
with V. M. I. and, of course, had only lim- 
ited time to get ready for the Thanksgiv- 
ing Day clash with Syracuse. Maryland out- 
played the Cadets but lost, 13 to 0. 

The Terps went into the battle with the 
Keydets with only two victories against six 
defeats, the triumphs coming in the first 
pair of tilts of the campaign. Since then 
the going has been rough, but Maryland 
really has not been outclassed in any game 
and at least one or two might have been 
placed on the right side of the ledger but 
for mental or mechanical slips. 

Here is the record: 

Maryland, 26 Hampden-Sydney, 0. 

Maryland, 12; Western Maryland, 0. 

Maryland, 7; Virginia, 12. 

Maryland, 12; Rutgers, 25. 

Maryland, 0; Florida. 14. 

Maryland, 0; Penn State, 12. 

Maryland, 0; Georgetown, 20. 

Maryland, 0; V. M. I., 13. 

The November 11 loss to the strong 
Hovas was not as one-sided as the outcome 
indicates and it possibly might even have 
been a scoreless battle had not two pieces 
of Terp strategy backfired and set up 
Georgetown's first two touchdowns. As it 
was, the Terp plavers put up a fine fight 
against heavy odds. 

The victory enabled Georgetown to get 
on even terms in the modern series, which 
now stands 3-all. 



Turkey Day Contest 
Completes Season 

Maryland closed its football season 
when it met Syracuse at College Park on 
Thanksgiving Day (November 23) morn- 
ing at 1 1 o'clock, as the Washington and 
Lee clash, scheduled for the original 
Thanksgiving Day (November 30) and 
then tentatively set for December 2, has 
been called off at the request of the Gen- 
erals on account of the long wait between 
games and the uncertainty of the weather 
at such a late time. 

The Terps and Generals had planned 
their Turkev Day affair to be annual and, 
with the schedule arranged two years in ad- 
vance, some shifts will have to be made if 
they are to meet next fall on the holiday. 
As matters stand, Rutgers is slated No- 
vember 23 next fall, two days after the new 
Thanksgiving Day, and it is likely that this 
game may be played on Turkey Day. This 
is logical unless some change can be made 
to get Washington and Lee back on the 
Thanksgiving Day card. 

As arranged, here is how Maryland's grid 
card for 1940 reads: 

September 28 — Hampden-Sydney at Col- 
lege Park. 
October 5 — University of Pennsylvania 

at Philadelphia. 
October 1 2 — University of Virginia at Col- 
lege Park. 
October 19 — University of Florida at 

Gainesville. 
October 26 — Western Maryland at Balti- 
more Stadium. 
November 9 — Georgetown University at 

College Park. 
November 16 — Virginia Military Institute 

at Lexington. 
November 23 — Rutgers University at Col- 
lege Park. 
November 28 — Washington and Lee at 
Baltimore Stadium. 
It may be that the now open date of 
November 2 will offer a solution of the 
problem but settling things so that Wash- 
ington and Lee and Maryland can resume 
their Thanksgiving series in 1940 may not 
be possible. 



Maryland Alumni News 



Cross Country Squad 
Gains Many Honors 

Maryland's cross country team, which 
defeated Navy, Virginia and North Caro- 
lina, finished second in the Southern Con- 
ference championships at Chapel Hill No- 
vember 18. 

Jim Kchoe, Mason Chronister and Tom 
Fields, who finished abreast in first place 
in all of the dual triumphs. 



Former Lacrosser 
Gets Around 

An Old Line ace defense stickman and 
an All America lacrosser has really been 
getting around. Sam Silber, '34, now an 
Ensign in the United States Naval Flying 
Corps, has already seen a large portion of 
this world. He has flown across the Equa- 
tor and zoomed oyer Sugar Loaf Mountain 
in Rio. He paraded across the City of 
Ponce in Puerto Rico, at the same time 
somebody was taking "potshots" at the 
Go\ernor. Next he entered Haiti, where 
lie climbed the highest hill and there saw 
the ruins of the Castle of Henri Chris- 
ophe. While going through the Panama 
Canal aboard the aircraft carrier Yorktown, 
he stopped in Panama City and after a 
fling at roulette emerged the yictor with 
SI 00. In addition, naval problems have 
carried him more than a thousand miles 
east of the coast. But now he is probably 
:ettled for a time in the beautiful Coro- 
nado in that lovely State of California. 
"Join the Navy and see the world" — and 
so did Sam. 



BASKETBALL FLOOR SMOOTH 

The basketball floor in Ritchie Colise- 
um has been done over in the style of 
Madison Square Garden of New York and 
now not only is good to look at but is ideal 
for playing purposes. Burt Shipley, the able 
mentor, and his charges are happy over the 
improvement. 



Married — Theta Wonders, '36, now is 
Mrs. Steven Porter. The wedding took 
place in June. The newlyweds reside at 
3516 W Place. N.W., Washington. D. C. 



Woods Does Fine Job 
With Terp Frosh 

Although the Maryland freshman grid- 
dcrs won only two of their five contests, 
Al Woods, one time Terp grid ace and now 
agronomy instructor, has done a great job 
with the Little Terps. 

Being used primarily to tune up the var- 
sity, as imitators of the Maryland foes, the 
yearlings did not have a fair chance to do 
their best. 

The material, as a whole, was not strong 
but the youngsters played sound funda- 
mental football. They scored an upset in 
defeating the V. M. I. Frosh, 13 to 0, and 
later beat the Naval Training Station team 
at Norfolk, 27 to 0. 



EIGHT GRIDMEN ARE SENIORS 

Eight gridders — Franny Beamer, end; 
Bob Brown and Ralph Albarano, tackles; 
George Lawrence and Ed Lloyd, guards, 
and Persh Mondorff, John Boyda and 
Frank Skotnicki, backs — played their last 
football for Maryland in the Thanksgiving 
Day game with Syracuse. 



SOCCER TEAM SCORES UPSET 

Maryland's soccer team, coached by Stew 
McCaw, sprang a big upset and threw the 
State race into a triple tie by defeating the 
Towson Teachers, 4 to 1. It was Towson's 
first defeat in three years. 



Married — Miss Mary Duke Warfield, 
'40, and Laurence L. Williams, '40, were 
recently married. Ralph I. Williams, '33, 
was best man. Among the ushers were Gus- 
tavus Warfield, '39. The newlyweds will 
make their home in Baltimore, where Lau- 
rence is in the department of occupational 
therapy of the Phipps Clinic at the Johns 
Hopkins Hospital. 

o 

Lawyer — Hubert Arnold, '3 5, now is 
with the James Maxwell Fassett law firm 
in New York. He is located at 60 Wall 
Street. Arnold received his LL.B. last year 
from Duke University. 



Homecoming Big Success; 
Old Grads Return 

(Continued from Page 4) 

1921— Paul Walker, College Park; Ray- 
mond Stone. Canal Zone; C. Walter Cole, 
Towson. Md.; Clay Groton. Glencoe, Md.; A. 
C. Diggs, Towson, Md. 

1922— Wm. W. Kirby. Rockville. Md.; 
Chauncey Brown. Washington, D. C.; Her- 
bert Snyder, Union Bridge, Md.; A. W. Hines, 
Washington. D. C; Edwin B. Filbert, Balti- 
more. Md.; Mark Welsh. College Park. 

1923— Kirk Besley, University Park, Md.; 
Benjamin L. Barnes, Princess Anne. Md.; 
C. W. England. College Park; Charles E. 
White. College Park; L. G. Mathias. Hagers- 
town, Md.; Alma H. Preinkert, College Park; 
Julius P. Parran, Lusby P. O.; Donald E. 
Walkins, Mount Airy, Md.; Harvey Tyndal 
Casbarian, Riverdale, Md. 

1924— C. G. Branner, Baltimore, Md.; Mrs. 
Edwin Filbert. Baltimore, Md.; Geo. Luekey, 
Washington, D. C; Wm. Penn, HyattsviLe, 
Md.; L. F. Sehott, Rockville, Md. 

1925— Clarible Welsh, College Park; Capt. 
J. C. Burger, Quantico, Va.; Frank Banfield. 
Laurel, Md.; Douglas Parson. Lusby P. O.; 
A. L. Schrader, Chevy Chase, Md.; Bruce T. 
Stambaugh. Washington, D. C; J. Vandoren, 
Washington, D. C; D. T. Watkin, Mount 
Airy, Md.; L. G. Worthington, Berwyn, Md.; 
E. F. Zalesak, College Park; Grace Hale, 
Bloomfield. N J.; Capt. John F. Hough, 
Quantico, Va. 

1926— H. S. Hubbard, Greensboro, Md.; Al- 
bert A. Ady, Rockville, Md.; George F. Al- 
brecht, Frederick, Md.; Wm. H. Evans, Hale- 
thorpe. Md.; Wm. Hamilton Whiteford, Bal- 
timore, Md.; W. C. Supplee, Laurel, Md. 

1927— Roger L. Whitford, Ruxton, Md.; Dr. 
E. I. Baumgartner, Oakland, Md.; Mike Ste- 
vens, Beuhesda, Md.; Kathryn S. Helbig, 
Oakland, Md.; F. Coakly. Waidorf, Md. 

1928— J. H. Bafford, Bloomfield, N. J.; 
Geneva Reich Fricke, Hyattsville, Md.; Don- 
ald Janis, Washington, D. C; J. E. Savage, 
Baltimore, Md.; Lewis W. Thomas, Washing- 
ton. D. C. 

1929 — Aaron Friedenwald, Baltimore, Md.; 
Herman Epstein, Baltimore. Md.; Philip 
Carkran, Rhodesdale, Md.; Edith Whiteford, 
Ruxton, Md.; Mrs. Joseph H. Howard. Bal- 
timore, Md. 

1930— Millard S Whiteley, Preston, Md.; 
John N. Umbarger, Baltimore, Md.; Ralph E. 
Clark, Dundalk, Md.; W. W. Cobey, College 
Park; Louise Townsend Savage, Baltimore, 
Md.; Warren G. Myers. Ellicott City, Md.; 
Donald Kieffer, New York City; George F. 
Madigan, Laurel, Md 

1931— Mildred Kettler, Baltimore, Md.; 
Sedney T. Lawler, Olney, Md.; Paul E. Nys- 
trom. College Park; Jane E. O'Neill, Hyatts- 
ville, Md.; John T. O'Neill, Hyattsville. Md.; 
Alton B. Rahbitt, Bethesda, Md.; Warren E. 
Rabbitt. Bethesda, Md.; P. M. Ambrose, Col- 
lege Park. 

1932— Charlie Fouts, Flemington, N. J.; 
May D. Fouts, Flemington, N. J.; W. A. Bur- 
slem, Hyattsville, Md.; J. Ellis Bowen, Hunt- 
ington, Md.; W. Miles Hanna, Bel Air. 

1933— Jeffrey M. Swall, Hyattsville, Md.; 
John R. Mitchell, College Park. 

1934— Nicholas Nides, Centreville. Md.; 
Louise Reinohl, Hyattsville, Md.; N. S. Soth- 
oron, Washington, D. C. 

1935 — Paul S. Bowers, York. Penna.; John 
A. Siedman, St. Paul Apts., Baltimore. Md.; 
Julia A. Nourman, Md.; John R. Herold. 
Wilson, Penna.; Wm. A. Harmon, Rockville 
Center, N. Y.; Peter N. Chumbris, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

1936— Brady Smith, Riviera Beach, Md.; 
Helen Quillen, Goldsboro, Md.; Paul Mulli- 
nix, Elkton. Md.; Polly Mayhew. Hyattsville, 
Md.; Louise Maddox. University Park. Md.; 
Wilbur I. Duvall, University Park, Md. 

1937— Mrs. Paul Mullinix, Elkton, Md.; 
Charles H. Cooke, Washington, D. C; W. B. 
Matthews. Brooklyn, N. Y.; Dorothy V. Mil- 
lar, Washington. D. C; Alice Ayers. Barton, 
Md.; Geo. E. Gilbert. College Park. 

1938— Thomas E. McGoury. Cumberland. 
Md.; Logan Schutz, University of Maryland; 
Elizabeth Mayhew, Hyattsville. Md.; Robert 
Plannon, Salisbury, Md. 

1939— H. U. Deeley. Baltimore. Md.; Mary 
E. Cronin. Aberdeen, Md.; Frank V. Steven- 
son, Baltimore, Md.; Kitty Pollard, Balti- 
more. Md.; Joseph Peaslee. Baltimore. Md.; 
Edwin Miller, Washington. D. C; Thomas W. 
Mears. Washington, D. C: Peeey Maslin. 
Baltimore. Md.; Wilson Kilby. Md. 

1940 — Virginia M. Law Delaware; Myron 
Creese. Assoc. College Park; J. A. Gamble. 
Washington, D. C, former faculty member. 



November, 1939 



Grapevine News About Those We Know 



COL. SAUNDERS, '10 RETURNS 

Col. C. H. Saunders, '10, has returned 
from the Far East where he spent two 
years on an inspection trip. Now he is sta- 
tioned at Fort Howard, Baltimore, as com- 
mander of the Twelfth Infantry. Upon 
his return to the U. S. A. he was promoted 
to the rank of a full Colonel. 

While in the Far East he met Preston 
L. Peach, '03, in the Philippines and 
formed a Maryland Chapter. Peach now is 
located in the Federated Malaya States 
and Saunders in Baltimore. Their next 
meeting will be held at College Park. 
O 

Married — Herbert O. Eby, '32, former 
President of the famous Rossborough 
Club, and Miss Marjorie Jean Stiles of 
Washington, were married Saturday, No- 
yember 4th. Herbert is President of the 
Metropolitan Law Institute. The newly- 
weds will reside at The Warw ick in Wash- 
ington. 

O 

Visits — Capt. Raymond Stone, '21, of 
the United States Army, who is on leave 
in the United States from his post in the 
Canal Zone, yisited the campus several 
times. On one visit he added to the year- 
book file in the Alumni Office several cop- 
ies of the Revielle, the student yearbook 
of yesteryear. It was his first visit on the 
campus for twenty years. 
O 

Married — Miss Leora L. Sanford, '36, 
a member of Tri Delt, and Mr. Ralph Hill, 
Jr.. of Cornell, were married recently. They 
will live in Washington. Miss Dorothy Al- 
len, '36, a sorority sister of Mrs. Hill's, was 
bridesmaid. 

O 

Birth — Dr. Frank K. Morris, '24, a spe- 
cialist in obstetrics, recently performed a 
Caesarean operation which was split-sec- 
ond timing that saved a baby's life after 
the mother died. 

"It was necessary to apply artificial res- 
piration and oxygen for four or five min- 
utes and then the baby began voluntary 
breathing. Today the baby is perfectly 
healthy and normal in every way," said Dr. 
Morris. 



Birth — To Dr. and Mrs. Robert Teeter, 
a son, Robert Graham, on October 17, 
1939. The Teeters live in Cumberland. 
Bob received his B.S. in '30 and Mrs. 
Teeter her M.S. in '38. 
o 

Birth — To Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Long, a 
daughter, Lois Anne, November 8, 1939. 
Joe was a member of the Class of '29, and 
President of Alpha Gamma Rho. The 
Longs are in Chico, California, where Joe 
is in charge of the Department of Agricul- 
ture's Plant Gardens. 
O 

Elected — During recent Freshman Class 
elections at the University Law School 
Dick Lane, '40, and Dan Prettyman, '39, 
formerly of College Park Schools, were 
elected President and Class Representa- 
tive, respectively. 

o 

Married — Ralph W. Ruble, '34, and 
Miss Elvira Sommerville Rudasill of Pooles- 
ville, Maryland, were recently married. 
Ralph is a member of Phi Kappa Phi and 
a specialist in geology. The newlyweds are 
residing in Chestertown, Maryland. 
O 

To Wed — Miss Virginia Elizabeth 
Koons and Mr. John Sippel Jacobaen are 
to wed. The date for the wedding has not 
been set. 

O 

Engaged — The engagement of Miss 
Gladys Virginia Johns, '37, and Mr. Wal- 
ter Hamilton Armiger, '37, was announced 
at a lawn party at the home of Miss Johns 
this summer. 

O 

Oil — Out in the oil country of Texas is 
E. Roane Melton, '25, a member of Sigma 
Phi Sigma. He is an explorer for oil as di 
rector of research for the Seismic Explora- 
tion, Inc., of Houston, Texas. In addition, 
he does consulting work for an oil com- 
pany and at present has a special problem 
for the Army. Recently he gave assistance 
to Harry T. Kelly, '34, former outstand- 
ing R. O. T. C. officer, and a member of 
Sigma Phi Sigma. There is another Mary- 
lander in Houston who operates a grocery 
store, Eugene Roger Steele, '24, formerly 
of Hagerstown, Maryland. 



Livestock And Dairy 
Building Dedicated 

(Continued from Page 5) 
equipped Animal Husbandry Departments 
in the country. 

Dr. Kenneth Ikeler is Head of the De- 
partment and was in charge of the pro- 
gram. Following the program all those at- 
tending the ceremonies were guests of the 
University at a beef luncheon held in the 
Dining Hall. 



Golfing — There is a golfer amongst us. 
Mike Levin, '15, of Akron, Ohio. Mike 
won a leg on the Knight Trophy of the 
Ohio American Legion last year, but lost 
the right to the cup this year by an eagle 
3 and a one-stroke margin which was a 74. 
Mike is a chemist and holds seven United 
States and Canadian patents. We are all 
rooting for Mike to win permanent pos- 
session of this trophy. 



Mosquitoes — Since last April W. A. 
Connell, '33, has been at the Delaware Ag- 
riculture Experiment Station, working on 
the salt marsh mosquito investigation, a 
project which he began several years ago 
with the United States Department of 
Agriculture, Department of Entomology. 
It is anticipated that he will return to Min- 
neapolis shortly. 



Teaching — Nellie Buckey, '25, former- 
ly of Columbia University, now is teaching 
at Buffalo State Teachers College. Her 
address is 577 Richmond Avenue, Buffa- 
lo, New York. 

O 

Birth — Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Holland 
have a daughter, Margaret Jane, born April 
14, 1939. Mrs. Holland was formerly Miss 
Charlotte Burach of Baltimore. Stanley is 
a member of the class of '36. 



Address — Mr. and Mrs. Earl Edwards, 
'34, '35, are living at the La Salle Apart- 
ments, Connecticut Avenue and L Streets, 
N.W., Washington, D. C. Mrs. Edwards 
was formerly Martha Cannon, '35. An- 
other Cannon, Mrs. C. Richard Watson 
(nee Minna Cannon) is living in Beverly 
Hills, Virginia. 



10 



Maryland Alumni News 



Alumni Board Held 
Interesting Meeting 

Following the Georgetown • Maryland 
football game, members of the Alumni 
Board convened at the Lord Calvert Inn 
for the fall meeting. Several matters of 
importance were discussed. 

A report was made about Homecoming 
Day, which was very pleasing to review. 
Practically everyone had attended and 
thought the occasion was very colorful. 

The president gave a report on the re- 
sults on arrangements regarding the Char- 
ter Day Celebration. An account of what 
has taken place to date can be found else- 
where in this issue. 

A report was made to the Board by 
President Sylvester on the initial meeting 
of the Alumni Fund, Board of Trustees 
and the projects they are planning to spon- 
sor. They arc as follows: Student Loan 
Fund, Scholarship Fund, Student-Alumni 
Union, Silvester Memorial Library, and 
Countv Student Aid Fund. 

The Board had made a definite request 
that more countv meetings be held. Each 
Board member has agreed to attend at 
least one meeting and all, if possible. 



4 4. 



i. - 

IT - 



fife 



Ideal place to entertain 
friends or relatives. 



lb 



Headquarters 
for Good Times! 

For your convention, banquet or 
dance . . . whatever the occasion, 
you'll find that the Lord Balti- 
more's exceptional services and 
facilities will make it a long- 
remembered success. 700 com- 
fortable rooms, two restaurants, 
bars and luxurious Cocktail 
Lounge at your service. 

$3 TO $6 SINGLE 




10RD BALTIMORE 




BALTIMORE. 



MARYLAND 



The One Hundred and Thirty-third Annual 

University of Maryland Charter Day Celebration 

Saturday, January 20, 1940 - Seven p. m. 



Lord Baltimore Hotel 

BALTIMORE, MD. 

Write Alumni Secretary for Reservations 



$2.50 per person 



CUT ON THIS LINE 



THE NEW YEAR DRIVE IS ON 

iave You Joined Your Fellow Alumni? 

=PLEASE FILL OUT AND RETURN THIS BLANK NOW ! ! 



Fellow Alumni: 

wish to be a contributing member of 
ie University of Maryland Alumni As- 
>ciation, and am enclosing the usual 
mount of $2.00 for the year 1939-1940, 
: this fifty cents is for one year's sub- 
ription to the Alumni News. 



Name _ ...Class Occupation 

Address. 

Married? To whom ..Children 

Business address Title 



dok 0t 



G ^ULi 



IB 



-**. 





They do the job 
they're meant to do 



v^hesterfields are like that . . . they go about 
their business of giving you more smoking 
pleasure . . . tvith a taste, aroma and mildness 
that's all their own . . . the kind that only the 
right combination of the world's best ciga- 
rette tobaccos can give. 



» 



CHESTERFIELD 




ALUMNI 
NEWS 



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DECEMBER 




1939 




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His Excellency Herbert R. O'Conor, '20 

Governor of Maryland 

Guest of Honor 



Alumni 

Association 

Sponsors 




Hox. Paul V. McNutt 

Federal Security Administrator 
Guest Speaker 



The One Hundred and Thirty-Third Charter Day Celebration 
University of Maryland - Saturday, January 20, 1940 

Lord Baltimore Hotel 



BALTIMORE, MD. 





For Reservations, 
Write or Phone 

W. M. HILLEGEIST 
Univ. of Md., Baltimore 

Phone, Plaza 1100 







Hon. Harry W. Nice, 
Toastmaster 



Dr. H. C. Bvrd. '08 

President, University of Maryland 

Host 



Volume XI 



MARYLAND ALUMNI NEWS, DECEMBER, 1939 



Number 7 



Alumni Association — University of Maryland 

Founded in 1892 



OFFICERS FOR 1939-40 

Charles W. Sylvester, '08, President 
Baltimore, Md. 

P. W. Chichester, '20, First Vice-President Frederick, Md. 

H. W. Burnside, '04, Second Vice-President Washington, D. C. 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Secretary-Treasurer College Park, Md. 

ALUMNI BOARD 
(Note — The officers named above are also members of the Alumni Board) 

J. Donald Kieffer, '30 Arts and Sciences 

Charles V. Koons, '29 Engineering 

R. R. Lewis, '19 Education 

John A. Silkman, '35 Agriculture 

Ruth Miles, '31 Home Economics 

Norwood Sothoron, '34 Commerce 

MEMBERS AT LARGE 

E. E. Powell, '13; Philip Wertheimer, '29 Men's Representatives 

Mary York Gadd, '28; Gertrude Chesnut, '27 . Women's Representatives 
C. Walter Cole, '21 Immediate Past President 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Editor 

Maryland Alumni News, issued monthly by the University of Maryland Alumni Associa- 
tion at College Park, Md., as second-class matter under the Act of Congress, March 3. 1879. 

Annual Alumni Association dues are $2.00. One year's subscription to Alumni News, 
50 cents. 

GROUP LEADERS 

ALLEGANY COUNTY: E. Brooke Whitting, '98, President; Dr. Joseph Franklin. '21. Secretary, 
Cumberland, Md. 

BALTIMORE COUNTY: C. Walter Cole, '21, President; H. B. Derrick. '17, Secretary. Towson. 
Maryland. 

BALTIMORE CITY: Chester Tawney. '31, President. 4022 Roland Avenue; E. Gordon Ham- 
mond. '34. Secretary, 1023 W. Barre Street, Baltimore, Md. 

CAROLINE COUNTY: George W. Clendaniel. '20. President; Dr. Maurice A. Brackett. '21. 
Treasurer; Mrs. George W. Clendaniel. '21, Secretary, all of Denton, Md. 

HARFORD COUNTY: W. B. Munnikhuysen, '14, President; H. M. Carroll. '20. Secretary. 
Bel Air, Md. 

FREDERICK COUNTY: J. Homer Remsberg, '18. President; Henry R. Shoemaker. '17. Sec- 
retary. Frederick, Md. 

MONTGOMERY COUNTY: Lawrence G. Smoot, '18. President. Kensington. Md.; Mary Fisher. 
'36. Secretary. Rockville, Md. 

NEW YORK CITY: Mr. James E. Dingman. '21, President. 32 Sixth Avenue; Sarah Morris. '25. 
Secretary. 310 East 44th Street. New York City. 

PHILADELPHIA: A. Moulton McNutt, '06. President, 413 Cooper Street, Camden. N. J.; J. P 
Mudd. '07, Secretary. 174 Manheim Street. Philadelphia, Pa. 

PITTSBURGH: E. Minor Wermer. '27, President, 1111 Gladys Avenue; Dr. A. A. Krieger. '32. 
Secretary Highland Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

WASHINGTON, D. C: J. Douglas Wallop, '19, President, 6139 N. Dakota Avenue, N.W.; 
Charles V. Koons. '29. Secretary, 419 Fourth Street, N.E., Washington. 

WASHINGTON COUNTY: Hon. Henry Holzapfel, Jr., '93, President. Hagerstown. Md.; L. G. 
Mathias, '23. Secretary, Hagerstown, Md. 



"M" CLUB OFFICERS AND BOARD MEMBERS 



A. K. Besley. '23 President 

Limes W. Stevens, "19 Vice-President 



Dr. E. N. Cory, '09 
G. F. Pollock. '23 



Secretary-Treus. 
Historian 



REPRESENTATIVES 



Mike Stevens, '37 Baseball 

W. C. Supplee. '26 Basketball 

Stewart McCaw, '35 Boxing 

E. E. Powell, '14 Lacrosse 

Rocer Whiteeord, '28 Track 



Iames Shumate, '20 Tennis 

John Gadd. '27 Cross Country 

Lewis W. Thomas. '28 Football 

Dr. E. B. Friedenwald. '03 I 
Dr. A. W. Valentine. '04 \ 



At Large- 



Cover Picture 

Calls to your attention the Annual Char- 
ter Day Celebration of our University. The 
background picture is an etching of the Ad- 
ministration and Library Building at Col- 
lege Park. Soon, however, there will be a 
new Administration Building. 

Alumni, Faculty and friends gather in 
Baltimore on the annual celebration of 
Charter Day to strengthen the bonds of 
fellowship for a greater University of Mary- 
land. 

Listen for the weekly broadcasts about 
the history of your Alma Mater on Satur- 
day at 6:30 over Station WCAO. 



Fellow Alumni of Maryland: 

Every Alumnus of the University of 
Maryland should go to Baltimore on Jan- 
uary 20, 1940. It is the One Hundred and 
Thirty-third Charter Day Celebration. A 
fine banquet and dance are to be held. 

Hon. Paul V. McNutt, Administrator of 
the Federal Security Administration, will 
be our speaker. I had the pleasure of hear- 
ing him at the American Vocational As- 
sociation Convention in Grand Rapids on 
December 7. More than a thousand edu- 
cators and friends of vocational education 
enjoyed his talk. He has something to say 
and knows how to say it! 

Governor Herbert R. O'Conor, a fellow 
Alumnus, will lend dignity to the occasion. 

Hon. Harry YV. Nice, former Governor 
of Maryland, as the toastmaster, is unsur- 
passed. Other features of the banquet this 
year will make it the best one yet held. I 
shall look forward to greeting you at that 
time. 

Every graduate of the University should 
be an enthusiastic and interested member 
of our Association. He should know and 
appreciate what the University stands for. 
We can unify and amalgamate all graduates 
of the various schools into one huge Alum- 
ni Association. Let us, from College Park, 
participate in every University activity and 
work to the end that we may have a great 
and influential school — the kind which the 
people of Maryland will be proud of. 

May I, at this time, calle your attention 
to the winter sports schedule. The program 
includes basket ball, boxing and indoor 
track. There are dates to suit your con- 
venience and you owe it to the University 
to be present at as many of the affairs as 
vou can possibly attend. 

Cordially yours. 

Chares W. Sylvester, 

President. 



Snapshots From Homecoming 







National And State Officials 

Lead Charter Day Celebration 



Governors and ex-Governors will be the 
leading figures in the Annual Charter Day 
Celebration of our Alma Mater on Satur- 
day January 20. 1940, at the Lord Balti- 
more Hotel in Baltimore. 

Mis Excellency. Herbert R. O'Conor, 
'20, LL.B., Governor of Maryland, will 
be guest of honor and lead the parade of 
dignitaries. 

The Hon. Paul V. McNutt, Federal Se- 
curity Administrator and former Governor 
of Indiana, will be the guest speaker. Mr. 
McNutt, a graduate of the University of 
Indiana, has held many prominent offices 
during his rise to international fame. He 
was a teacher at his Alma Mater and later 
Dean of the Law School. Before his recent 
appointment as Federal Security Admin- 
istrator, he was Governor-General of the 
Philippine Islands. After having been a 
university dean and then a governor, he 
should have knowledge and thoughts on 
State institutions which will be of consid- 
erable interest. 

Toastmaster for the occasion will be our 
own graduate, the Hon. Harry W. Nice, 
'98, former Governor of Maryland, a jovial 
and humorous speaker. 

Dr. Harry Clifton Byrd, '08, President 
of our Alma Mater, will be the official 
host and lead the celebration. 

The directing head for this great occa- 
sion is Daniel F. Lynch, '25, D.D.S., a 
nationally known dentist. He is a man who 
has attained a position of high esteem 
among his fellowmen. He has accepted the 
chairmanship of this celebration with a 
great deal of interest and enthusiasm. 

Dr. Lynch's first assistant is another 
Alumnus of prominent standing. Dr. 
Thomas B. Aycock. '24, Medicine, now 
Surgeon-in Chief of Staff of Baltimore Citv 
Hospitals. He is also Professor of Clinical 
Surgery at the University Hospital and 
takes an active part in all Alumni activities. 

Sharing the responsibility of directing 
the progress of the celebration are the 
presidents of the various Alumni Associa- 
tions — Dr. Arthur Hebb, Medical; Dr. 
Harry E. Kelsey, Dental; Dr. Charles S. 
Austin, Pharmacy; Miss Bessie L. Maston, 



HON. PAUL V. McNUTT 
Speaker 

GOV. HERBERT R. O'CONOR 
Guest Of Honor 



General Chairman 




Daniel F. Lynch, '24 



Vice-Chairman 




Thomas B. Aycock, '24 



'20, Nursing; Mr. John E. Magers, '14, 
Law; and Mr. Charles \V. Sylvester, '08, 
College Park Schools. 

It was the above-named Alumni who 
met and unanimously selected and ap 
proved the sponsorship of this worthy en- 
deavor. Alumni presidents have appointed 
members of their associations to serve on 
various committees and county organiza- 
tions throughout the State. 

This affair not only serves as a celebra- 
tion but also as an opportunity for fellow 
Alumni to become better acquainted and 
unify our effort toward a greater University 
of Maryland. The general program will be 
a banquet, followed by a short speaking 
program, a dance, and get together of old 
friends. 

Last year the capacity of the Lord Balti- 
more Hotel was taxed and from the enthu- 
siasm displayed by the committee mem- 
bers over the fact of having the Hon. Paul 
V. McNutt as the principal speaker, we 
will have the largest turnout ever. It is sug- 
gested that Alumni write direct to their 
own Alumni secretary for reservations with 
members of their own organization and 
faculty. Should members of the county or- 
ganizations wish to make up a group of 
their own, it will be possible for them to 
reserve an entire table of eight or ten 
places by writing the Chairman of the Res- 
ervation Committee, Mr. Willard M. Hil 
legeist, University of Maryland, Baltimore, 
Maryland, as soon as possible. The cost 
of the banquet will be $2.50 per plate. 

This is- the annual get-together of all de- 
partments of the University which assem- 
bles Alumni, faculty and friends. It is your 
affair to make of it what you will. No 
Alumnus should miss this great occasion. 
Members of the committees on arrange- 
ments are as follows: 



General Committee — Chairman. Daniel F. 
Lynch, '25, D.D.S.; Vice-Chairman, Thomas 
B. Aycock. '24, M.D. 

Dinner Committee — Chairman, Leo C. Ret- 
taliata. '18. Ph.G.; Daniel S. Sullivan, LL.B.; 
Arthur I. Bell. '19. D.D.S.; Miss Alice El- 
chenko. '34. R.N.; Howard I. Moss. '23, B.S.; 
Miss Miriam Connolly, Dietitian; A. T. Gun- 
dry, '94. M.D.; Lealon B. Wright, member of 
T. A. M. P. A. 

Invitation Committee — Chairman, Howard 
A. Sweeten. '19. LL.B.; J. Fred Emerson, '17, 



December, 1939 



Alumni Presidents And Co -Chairmen Of Charter Day 




Chas. S. Austin, Ph.G. 



Arthur Hebb, M.D. 



Charles W. Sylvester, B.S. John E. Magers, LL.B. 



Harry E. Kelsey, D.D.S. 



D.D.S.; Edwin W. Wells, '05, LL.B.; Mrs. 
Frank M. Budacz. '26. Ph.G.; Frank K. Mor- 
ris, '27. M.D.; Mrs. Harry C. Hull, R.N. 

Program Committee — Chairman, Vincent 
McGrail, '23, D.D.S. ; Mrs. Blanche Horine, 
'21, R.N.; Willis R. Jones, '14. LL.B.; O. H. 
Saunders, '10, B.S.; Frank R. Paul, '36, B.S.; 
Harry C. Hull, M.D. 

Publicity Committee — Chairman, Omar 
Crothers. '29, B.S.; E. Paul Mason, '15. LL.B.; 
Ethelbert Lovett, '22, D.D.S.; Miss Vesta 
Swarts. '29. R.N.: Carl Hummelsine, '37, B.S.; 
W. Hamilton Whiteford, '26, A.B.; Charles 
Maxson. '10, M.D.; Medford C. Wood. '27, 
Ph.G. 

Ticket Committee — Chairman, W. M. Hille- 
geist, '12. B.S.; Miss Ann Hoke, '35. R.N.; 
Miss Elsie Sperver, '26. R.N.; M. E. Coherth, 
'27, D.D.S.; C. Clifton Coward, '23, D.D.S.; 
D. B. Swinehart, '37, D.D.S.; J. Hinton 
Shackelford, '36, D.D.S.; Kenneth B. Boyd, 
'24, M.D.; J. Paul Schmidt, '14, LL.B.; J. 
Lewis Rapp; Walter L. Clark, '02, LL.B.; 
James W. Stevens, '19, B.S.; George F. Pol- 
lock. '23, B.S.; Marvin J. Andrews, '22, M.S. 

Reception Commitee — Chairman, Robert P. 
Bay, '05, M.D.; W. R. Amberson, M.D.; Max 
K. Baklor, '16, D.D.S.; Miss Estella C. Bald- 
win, '27, R.N.; L. B. Broughton, '08, B.S.; 
B. Lucien Brun, '05. D.D.S.; Frank B. Bom- 
berger, '94, B.S.; Peter W. Chichester, '20, 
B.S.; Allan Cleaveland, '96, LL.B.; C. Walter 
Cole, '21, A.B.; W. W. Cobey, '33, B.S.; Miss 
Marie O. Cox. '31. R.N.; David C. Danforth. 
'15, D.D.S.; Arthur L. Davenport, '10, D.D.S.; 
Hyman Davidov, '29, Ph.G.; A. C. Diggs, '21, 
A.B.; L. L. Emmart, '22. D.D.S,; Geary Ep- 
pley. '18, B.S.; J. E. Faber, '26, B.S.; E. 
B. Freeman, '00. M.D.; Thomas Galvin, M.D.; 
Albert E. Goldstein, M.D.; Kenneth E. Ham- 
lin, '38, B.S.; George E. Hardy, Jr., '26, 
D.D.S.; Harry S. Harrison, '12, Ph.G.; E. 
H. Hayward, M.D.; Howard Van Natta, '14, 
D.D.S.; John J. Wannenwetsch, '13. Ph.G.; 
S. Ralph Warnken, '14, LL.B.; Walter D. 
Wise, M.D.; H. Boyd Wylie, '12, M.D.; Wil- 
liam C. Wylie, '14. LL.B.; H. W. Jacobs, '19, 
D.D.S.; E. S. Johnson, '12, M.D.; W, B, 
Kemp, '11, B.S. 

Judge William H. Lawrence, '95, LL.B.; 
Miss Lucille Laws, '36, B.S.; Harry Levin. 
'26. D.D.S.; J. Elmer Martin, LL.B.; Miss 
Frances Meredith, '10, R.N.; John H. Michael. 
'32, D.D.S.; Emil Novak, '04, M.D.; John T. 
O'Mara. '03. M.D.; Thomas O'Rourke, M.D.; 
Miss Jean Patterson, '38. B.S.; Daniel J. Pes- 
sagno, M.D.; M. C. Pincoff, M.D.; T. Ells- 
worth Ragland, '14, Ph.G.; Mrs. Charles Reif- 
schneider. '20, R.N.; Mrs. Maurice H. Robin- 
son, '32, R.N.; Miss Ann T. Scout, '18. R.N.; 
Daniel E. Shehan, '22; Arthur M. ShiDley. 
'02, M.D.; H. B. Shipley, '14. D.D.S.; B. Ho'ly 
Smith. '08, D.D.S.; Wiley W. Smith, '00, 
D.DS.; Mrs. Harry M. Stein, '17, R.N.; H. 
Haywood Street. '99. D.D.S.; John A. Stre- 
vig, '12, Ph.G.; Mrs. John Paul Troy, '17, R.N. 



Norfolk Alumni Entertain 

University Officials And Band 



When the Terp football squad sailed 
down the Potomac to meet the Keydets 
of V. M. I. in the new Municipal Stadium 
of Norfolk, Virginia, they were met bv 
city officials and a large gathering of Mary- 
land Alumni, 
headed b y 
Dr. Charles 
II. Lupton, 
'16, M. D., 
president and 
organizer of 
the Univer- 
sity of Mary- 
land Alumni 
Group of 
Tidewater, 
Virginia. Dr. 
Lupton also 
is a Lieuten- 
a n t Com- 
Dr. Chas. H. Lupton, '16 mander in 
the Naval Reserve Hospital Unit, a mem- 
ber of the medical faculty of the Norfolk 
division of William and Mary College, 
and is a member of the Senior Surgical 
Staff of the Norfolk General Hospital. 

The first event on the program planned 
to welcome the Old Liners was a recep- 
tion and a luncheon, headed by Mayor 
Gurkin of Norfolk, who extended a wel- 




come to the visitors. Dr. Hodges, Dean of 
the Norfolk division of William and Mary 
College, also gave greetings to the visitors. 

Dr. H. C. Byrd, '08, President and 
Alumnus of our Alma Mater, headed the 
official list from Maryland which also in- 
cluded Dr. L. B. Broughton, '08, Dean of 
the College of Arts and Science; Dr. J. Ben 
Robinson, '14, Dean of the Dental School; 
Dr. T. B. Aycock, '24, Professor of Clin- 
ical Surgery; Professor Gearv Eppley, '18, 
Director of Athletics; Mr. H. T. Casbar- 
ian, '23, University Comptroller, and the 
University Band, led by the student cheer- 
leaders. All were guests of the Norfolk 
Alumni Group. 

Following the luncheon, the University 
Band led the parade at a municipal dedi- 
catory program. At the game, several hun- 
dred Shriners joined the Band in putting 
on a colorful demonstration. 

Several other Alumni in Norfolk, who 
took an active part in the arrangements, 
were Dr. B. Allen Lester, '05, Dr. J. P. 
Bradshaw, '20, and Mr. E. E. Wooden, 
'34. Mrs. Lupton must not go unmen- 
tioned as she was the right bower in mak- 
ing arrangements for this occasion. 

Many other Alumni from Virginia and 
Maryland met at this spirited gathering. 
(Continued on Page 11) 



Maryland Alumni News 



School Of Dentistry, 1840-1940, 

To Hold Centenary Celebration 

The first lectures on dent- 
istry in America were deliv- 
ered by Dr. Horace H. Hay- 
den in the University of 
Maryland, School of Medi- 
cine, between the years 
1821 and 1825. These lec- 
tures were interrupted in 
1825 by internal dissension 
in the School of Medicine 
but were continued in the 
year 1837. It was Dr. Hay- 
den's idea that dentistry 
merited greater attention 
than had been given it by 
medical instruction, and he 

undertook to develop this "^t^T^Sr^ 

specialty as a branch of Original Building and Seal of the Baltimore College of 
medicine. With this thought t>ental Surgery, the First Dental School in the zvorld 



Naval Training 




in mind he, with the support of Dr. Cha- 
pin A. Harris, appealed to the Faculty of 
Physic of the University of Maryland for 
the creation of a department of dentistry 
as a part of the medical curriculum. The 
request having been refused, an indepen- 
dent college was decided upon. A charter 
was applied for and granted by the Mary- 
land Legislature, February 1, 1840. 

"An act incorporating the Baltimore Col- 
lege of Dental Surgery." 

"Section 1. Be it enacted by the Gen- 
eral Assembly of Maryland, That a Col- 
lege of Dentistry be, and the same is 
hereby established in the City of Balti- 
more, to be known and designated by the 
name and style of the Baltimore College 
of Dental Surgery." 

The first faculty meeting was held Feb- 
ruary 3, 1840, at which time Dr. H. H. 
Hayden was elected President and Dr. C. 
A. Harris, Dean. The introductory lecture 
was delivered by Dr. Harris on November 
3, 1840, to the five students matriculated 
in the first class. Thus was the Baltimore 
College of Dental Surgery, the first and 
oldest dental school in the world, created 
as the foundation of the present dental pro- 
fession. 

In 1873, the Maryland Dental College, 
an offspring of the Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgerv, was organized and con- 



tinued instruction in dental subjects until 
1879, at which time it was consolidated 
with the Baltimore College of Dental Sur- 
gery. A department of dentistry was organ- 
ized at the University of Maryland in the 
year 1882, graduating a class each year 
from 1883 to 1923. This school was char- 
tered as a corporation and continued as a 
privately owned and directed institution 
until 1920 when it became a State insti- 
tution. The Dental Department of the Bal- 
timore Medical College was established in 
1895, continuing until 1913, when it 
merged with the Dental Department of 
the University of Maryland. 

The final combining of the dental edu- 
cational interests of Baltimore was effected 
June 15, 1923, by the amalgamation of the 
student bodies of the Baltimore College 
of Dental Surgery and the University of 
Maryland, School of Dentistry, the Balti- 
more College of Dental Surgery becom- 
ing a distinct department of the State 
University under State supervision and con- 
trol. Thus we find in the Baltimore College 
of Dental Surgery, Dental School, Univer- 
sity of Maryland, a merging of the various 
efforts at dental education in Maryland. 
From these component elements have ra- 
diated developments of the art and sci- 
ence of dentistry until the strength of its 
Alumni is second to none, either n number 
or degree of service to the profession. 



The Naval Reserve Aviation Base, Ana- 
costia, D. C, announced recently that pre- 
liminary flight training classes will be con- 
tinued through the fall and winter months. 
These classes are designed to provide ele- 
mentary pilot instruction for eligible col- 
lege men who desire to obtain commis- 
sions in the Aviation Branch of the Naval 
Reserve. 

Requirements for admission are as fol- 
lows: 

( 1 ) Must be male citizens of the United 
States. 

(2) Must be between 20 and 27 years of 
age. 

( 3 ) Must be unmarried and agree to re- 
main so for two years. 

(4) Must be found educationally and 
physically qualified for training in ac- 
cordance with prescribed standards. 

(5) No mental examinations are given, 
but the applicants are given prefer- 
ence in the following order of educa- 
tional standing. Official transcript of 
college record is submitted with the 
application, and is the criteria in ad- 
judging educational qualifications: 

(a) Graduates of accredited colleges 
or universities. 

(b) Candidates who have completed 
two or more years of college, 
completing freshman mathemat- 
ics and phvsics. 

(c) Those who have acquired sub- 
stantially an equivalent knowl- 
edge by other means; and whose 
experience, training and aptitude 
for the service are sufficiently 
outstanding to render them par- 
ticularly desirable. 

Following approval bv the Navv Depart- 
ment of an application, the applicant re- 
ports to the Naval Reserve Aviation Base, 
at Anacostia, D. C, which trains young 
college men from Virginia, West Virginia, 
and Maryland. After a month of elimina- 
tion training, at the end of which the stu- 
dent solos, he is given a commission as an 
aviation cadet in the Naval Reserve, and 
goes to the Naval Air Station, at Pensa- 
cola, Florida, yvhere he takes the identical 
course provided for aviators of the regular 
Navy. 

Graduating from Pensacola, after ap- 
( Continued on Page 11) 



December. 1939 



Old Line Athletic Contributions 



By W. H. ("Bill") HOTTEL: 



Grid Team Courageous 
In Losing Campaign 

Maryland's 1939 football season was a 
disappointment in games won and lost but 
a tribute to the players for the great cour- 
age and spirit thev displayed throughout 
the campaign, in which only two victories 
were scored in nine contests. 

Labeled in advance one of the best-bal- 
anced squads Maryland has had in years 
and plaving a lot of good football, the 
Terps had just enough things happen at 
the wrong time to prevent them from win- 
ning at least three of the games they lost, 
which would have been enough to have 
placed them on the right side of the ledger. 

This was the second successive season 
that Maryland dropped seven of nine games 
after a great 8-2 record in 1937. In 1936, 
the first year Frank Dobson was head 
coach, the team won six and lost five, mak- 
ing his record as head mentor at Maryland 
18 wins against 21 losses. 

In 1935, with Jack Faber in charge and 
Dobson associate coach, the eleven won 
seven, lost two and tied two. 

Faber also was head mentor of the 1934 
team that won seven and lost three to rec- 
ompense for the record of three wins 
against seven defeats in 1933 when he 
served at the head of a board that directed 
football. That was the season President 
Byrd got fully away from the game for the 
first time since he came back to Maryland 
in 1912. 

That gave Faber and his cohorts a rec- 
ord of 17 wins, 12 losses and two ties over 
a three-year stretch. That's the story since 
the Curley Byrd coaching regime. We 
await future chapters. 

Maryland's complete record this year 
follows 

Maryland, 26; Hampden-Sydney, 0. 

Maryland, 12; Western Maryland, 0. 

Maryland, 7; Virginia, 12. 

Maryland, 12; Rutgers, 25. 

Maryland, 0; Florida, 14. 

Maryland, 0; Penn State, 10. 

Maryland, 0; Georgetown, 20. 

Maryland, 0; V. M. I., 13. 

Maryland, 7; Syracuse, 10. 



Varsity Football Coaching Job Is Main Topic 

On Maryland Campus And Among Old Grads 



Who is going to be Maryland's new 
football coach? was the question that was 
general on the Maryland campus and 
among the Terp Alumni when this way 
written. This query may be answered 
shortly but probably not before Rosy Pol- 
lock gets this issue of the "Bingville Bu- 
gle'' to his subscribers. 

It is hoped that everyone will be happy 
when Frank Dobson's successor finally is 
named and President Byrd has given as- 
surance on the big points — that Geary 
Eppley will remain as Athletic Director, 
that there will be no change in the athletic 
policy of the University that has brought 
nation wide admiration, and that he is 
highly gratified with the way other sports 
are handled by the present staff. 

There is nothing surprising about this 
but it is nice to hear kind words now and 
then and we hope there will be plenty of 
them owing after the new football set-up 
is announced. 

Maryland Boys Okay 

With the going of Dobson, Col. Harvey 
Miller, the highly-efficient boxing mentor, 
is the only member of the staff at present 
who is a non-Maryland product. 

In fact, Maryland boys — starting with 
Prexy Byrd, who has done some great 
quarterbacking as a player, coach and 
head of the University — have done all 
right by their Alma Mater. 

To mention a few, there are Eppley, 
who is track coach and Dean of Men in 
addition to his task as Athletic Director; 
Burt Shipley, long-time successful coach 
of the basket ball and baseball teams; 
Bacteriologist Dr. Jack Faber, head la- 
crosse mentor and football and basket ball 
aide; Al Heagy of the Chemistry Depart- 
ment, able teacher in the same three 
sports; Charles LeRoy Mackert, all-time 
football great, who is doing an outstand- 
ing job as head of the Physical Education 
Department, and Al Woods, agronomy 



instructor, wh oengenders real football in- 
to none-too-promising freshman squads. 
Plenty Of Examples 

Then we might add the members of the 
Athletic Board, of which Eppley is chair- 
man. Dr. Lev Broughton, Dean of the 
College of Arts and Sciences and State 
Chemist; Dr. Ernie Cory, football captain 
in 1908, the year after Byrd was the lead- 
er, and also a track ace, who now is State 
Entomologist and head of that department 
at the University; Dr. Bill Kemp, full- 
back and track man, who ranks among 
the topnotchers of the country in genetics 
and statistics, and Dr. Bill Supplee, foot- 
ball, basket ball and track notable and all- 
America end in 1923 in most experts' 
books, who is assistant professor in chem- 
istry. 

These are pertinent cases on the cam- 
pus that come quickly to mind, but there 
are plenty of others scattered about to 
show that i is not a bad idea to rely upon 
those who have been tested in Maryland 
athletics. 



P. S. — Rosy Pollock, Alumni secre- 
tary, editor of the Alumni News and 
freshman baseball coach, also was a grid 
and diamond star in his student days at 
Maryland but, of course, he would not 
want this mentioned in his own publica- 
tion. 

• 

Albarano And Murphy 
Slighted By Pickers 

Maryland football folk have lost all faith 
in all-star teams since Ralph Albarano, 60- 
minute tackle for three years, and Joe Mur- 
phy, brilliant junior back, were not even 
mentioned in the selection of all-Southern 
Conference elevens. 

Both received universal recognition in 
the Maryland-District of Columbia area 
where there are some pretty good grid 
teams and players, Murphy being hailed as 
the best all around back in the sector. 



8 



Maryland Alumni News 



Clemson Clash Is First 
Real Test of Quint 

Coach Burton Shipley is wondering just 
how good is his Maryland basketball team 
after easv wins over Western Maryland 
and Randolph-Macon in the only pre- 
holidav clashes, and is awaiting a true 
test of his charges in the series of tough 
games that starts when Clemson, South- 
ern Conference champion, is met New 
Year evening in the Coliseum in Balti- 
more. 

Shipley still has to be convinced that 
this season's outfit has a chance to meas- 
ure up to the 1938-39 squad that came 
strong in the latter stages of the regular 
campaign and was runner-up to Clemson 
in the title tourney. Maryland, in fact, 
broke even with Clemson, winning the 
regular season game, 45-35, and dropping 
the tourney final, 27-39, after George De- 
Witt, ace forward, had been lost on fouls 
early in the second half in the clash at 
Raleigh. 

DeWitt and Adam Bengoechea, for- 
wards; Charlie Weidinger, center, and 
Pershing Mondorff and Milton Mulitz, 
guards, all well-tested competitors, form 
the tentative first quint, with Bill Rea, 
another veteran, and Mearle DuVall, Bob 
Porter, Leon Vannais, Bernie Ulman and 
Ashton Garrett, sophs, appearing as the 
strongest supporters. 

Weidinger, grid ace and baseball pitch- 
er but a basketball roikie, was the spark- 
plug of the first two games, in which he 
scored 28 points. 

Shipley will carry all 20 men who are 
at present on the squad unless some of 
them quit of their own accord and is 
counting on developing quite a few for 
next season who will not see much action 
in the 1939-40 campaign. He will need 
them as Weidinger, Mondorff, Mulitz and 
Rea will be gone. 



Boxing Schedule 

Jan. 13 — Duke at College Park. 
Jan. 27 — Catholic U. at Washington. 
Feb. 3 — Virginia at College Park. 
Feb. 10— North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 
Feb. 17 — Western Md. at College Park. 
Feb. 23 and 24 — Southern Conference 
tournev at Columbia, S. C. 



MARYLAND'S 193940 BASKET BALL SQUAD 



Name Pos. 

* George DeWitt F. 

*Adam Bengoechea F. 
•Bill Rea . . F.-G. 

Charley Weidinger C. 
*Gene Ochsenreiter F. 

Leon Vannais F. 

Phil Buddington F. 

Dwight Gait F. 

Jim Wharton F. 

•Francis Beamer C. 

Mearle DuVall . C.-F. 

Robert Porter C. 

* Pershing Mondorff. G. 
Milton Mulitz G. 

•Dick Shaffer G. 

Edwin Miller G. 

John Woodward. .. G. 
Richard McHale. G. 

Ashton Garrett G. 

Bernie Ulman G. 

* 1938-39 Letter Men. 







Yrs. on 




Ht. 


Wt. 


Age Squad Class 


6-3 


158 


20 


2 


Jr. 


5-8 


152 


20 


3 


Sr. 


6-1 


162 


21 


3 


Sr. 


5-10 


177 


22 


1 


Sr. 


5-11 


160 


20 


2 


Jr. 


6-1 


160 


20 


1 


Soph 


6-2 


165 


18 


1 


Soph 


6 


158 


19 


1 


Soph 


6 


160 


21 


1 


Soph 


6-2 V 2 


183 


22 


3 


Sr. 


5-10 


169 


19 


1 


Soph 


6-2 


160 


20 


1 


Soph 


5-11 


195 


21 


3 


Sr. 


6 


181 


20 


3 


Sr. 


6-3 


181 


20 


2 


Jr. 


6-1 


169 


22 


1 


Sr. 


6-2 


171 


19 


1 


Soph 


5-10 


165 


20 


1 


Soph 


6-2 


183 


19 


1 


Soph 


6-1 


165 


21 


1 


Soph 



High 
School 
Western 
Ogden 
Tech 

McDonogh 
Rich-Montg. 
Bethesda 
Hyattsville 
Tech 

Forest Park 
Roosevelt 
Mt. St. Joe 
Western 
Emmitsburg 
Tech 
Ferndale 
Eastern 
Rich-Montg. 
Central 
Rich-Montg. 
Forest Park 



Home 
Washington, D. C. 
Chevy Chase. Md. 
Washington, D. C. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Rockville, Md. 
Chevy Chase, Md. 
College Park, Md. 
Hyattsville, Md. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Washington, D. C. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Washington, D. C. 
Emmitsburg, Md. 
Washington, D. C. 
Denton, Md. 
Washington, D. C. 
Rockville, Md. 
Washington, D. C. 
Rockville. Md. 
Baltimore, Md. 



Miller's Weeping Ends 
As Brown Reports 

Coach Heinie Miller of the Maryland 
boxing team, who has had many weeping 
spells over the heavyweight situation, has 
thrown away the crying towels with the re- 
porting of Bob Brown, agile 218-pound 
grid tackle. Brown apparently has every- 
thing it takes to make a winning collegiate 
scrapper. 

Previously Miller had suffered two great 
disappointments by having no heavyweight, 
despite the fact that there were two high- 
class ones in school. First, Ralph Burlin, 
another football tackle, who was an ace 
1939 Frosh scrapper, quit the fistic game 
to give all his time to his engineering stud- 
ies, and then George Evering, who worked 
out for three weeks and gave every indica- 
tion of filling the bill, decided he'd rather 
do something other than swap punches. 

Engineering studies also cost Miller an- 
other clever boxer in John Cordyack, grid 
halfback, who showed as a freshman that 
he could hold his own in either the 165- 
or 175-pound class. 

John Harn, 120; Bob Bradlev or Char- 



Basket Ball Card 



(All games at College Park, unless other- 
wise stated. Last year's results in parenthe- 
ses, with Maryland score given first.) 

Jan. 1 — Clemson at Baltimore 

Coliseum (45-35) 

Jan. 3 — Pennsylvania at 

Philadelphia (24-36) 

Jan. 4 — Rutgers at New Brunswick 

Jan. 9— Duke (37-34) 

Jan. 13— Richmond (34-41) 

Jan. 17 — Georgetown at Washington (25-39) 

Jan. 19 — Virginia Poly 

Jan. 20— Washington and Lee (39-37) 

Jan. 26— North Carolina State at 

Raleigh (extra period) (40-46) 

Jan. 27 — Clemson at Clemson 

Jan. 29 — South Carolina at Columbia 

Jan. 30— Duke at Durham (60-44) 

Jan. 31— Virginia at Charlottesville (31-21) 

Feb. 3 — Johns Hopkins 

Feb. 7 — V. M. I. at Lexington 

Feb. 8 — Washington and Lee at 

Lexington 

Feb. 14 — Washington College at 

Chestertown (47-37) 

Feb. 17— Catholic U. (All University 

Night) (40-38) 

Feb. 22— V. M. I (53-35) 

Feb. 24— George Washington (24-37) 

February 29 and March 1 and 2 — Southern 
Conference tourney at Raleigh. 



ley Dorr, 127; Nate Askin, 135; Hotsy Al- 
perstein, 145; Morris Roseman, 155; New- 
ton Cox, 165; and Israel Leites or Vincen 
Hughes, 175, doubtless will provide the 
boxers in the first seven classes for the 
opening match with Duke at College Park 
on January 13. 

Four of these are rookies — Harn, Al- 
perstein, Roseman and Hughes, and Leites 
has had little experience. 



MARYLAND'S 1940 BOXING SQUAD 



Name Wt. 

John Harn 120 

Charles Dorr 127 

'Robert Bradley 127 

Rowan Scarborough . . 127 

•Nathan Askin 135 

Kenneth Evans 135 

F. N. Lanza 135 

Isadore Alperstein 145 

Morris Roseman 155 

George Pyles 155-165 

•Newton Cox 165 

Vincen Hughes 175 

Israel Leites 175 

Robert Stalcup 175 

Bob Brown (Heavy) 218 

* 1939 Letter Men. 







Yrs. on 




Age 


Ht. 


Squad 


High School 


Home 


20 


5-7 


1 


Balto. City Col. 


Baltimore, Md. 


20 


5-6 


2 


Wood. Wilson 


Washington, D. C 


22 


5-7 


3 


Hyattsville 


Hyattsville, Md. 


21 


5-7 y 2 


2 


Balto. City Col. 


Baltimore, Md. 


21 


5-11 


3 


Balto. City Col. 


Baltimore, Md. 


21 


5-11 


2 


Central 


Washington, D. C 


20 


5-9 


1 


Guayama 


Aguirre, P. Rico 


21 


5-6 


1 


Balto. City Col. 


Baltimore, Md. 


20 


5-10 


1 


Balto. Poly. 


Baltimore, Md. 


19 


6 


1 


Oxon Hill 


Oxon Hill, Md. 


20 


5-11 


3 


Forest Park 


Baltimore. Md. 


19 


6 


1 


Balto. Poly. 


Baltimore, Md. 


21 


5-11 


2 


Balto. City Col. 


Baltimore. Md. 


19 


6-2 


1 


Mt. Rainier 


Berwyn, Md. 


21 


6-1 


1 


W. Hazleton 


West Hazleton, Pa 



December, 3939 



Indoor Meet Program 
Same As For 1939 

There will be no changes over 1939 in 
the events for the University of Maryland- 
Fifth Regiment invitational indoor games 
to be held in the latter's big armory in 
Baltimore on Saturdav night, February 10. 

Special events again will be topped by 
the featured Governor's Mile, which was 
won last March by John Munski of Mis- 
souri in 4:15, and the Oriole 660 and the 
Scholastic 660 will remain as topliners. 

There will be seven events each for col- 
legians and schoolboys, eight A. A. U. 
contests and four closed to members of the 
Maryland National Guard, as follows: 

Collegiate — 70-yard sprint handicap, 
440-yard dash, 880-yard run, mile run, mile 
relays to be classified by the Games Com- 
mittee, freshman mile relay, and the Ma- 
son-Dixon Conference sprint medley. 

Scholastic — 70-yard sprint, 1,000-yard 
run, high jump, Maryland Intcrscholastic 
Association mile relay, high school open 
mile relay, Maryland County High School 
half-mile relay, and prep school mile relay. 

A. A. U. Invitation — ■ 70-yard sprint 
handicap, 70-yard high hurdles, 1,000-yard 
run handicap, 16 pound shot put, pole 
vault, high jump, two-mile run, miss and 
out, and mile relay. 

National Guard — 70-yard sprint, 660- 
yard run and half-mile intercompany re- 
lay, all closed to the Fifth Regiment, and 
the half-mile relay for the Interregimental 
Championship. 

High Schools will be limited to two en- 
trants in the 70-yard sprint, the bar at the 
start in the high jumps will be placed at 5 
feet 2 for shool boys and at 5 feet 6 in the 
open, and the open pole vaulters must 
make their first leap at 11 feet. 

Entries close Monday, February 5, with 
Lieut. Roger Whitcford, secretary of the 
Games Committee, at the Fifth Regiment 
Armory in Baltimore. 



Frosh Basketers Busy 

Coach Al Heagy's freshman basketers 
will play a 1 5-game schedule starting with 
Western High at College Park on January 
1 at 4 P. M. He has the least promising 
vearling squad to report in years at Mary- 
land. 



19 Freshman Gridders 
Awarded Numerals 

Nineteen members of Coach Al Woods' 
freshman grid squad that did well to win 
two of three games have been awarded nu- 
merals. They are: 

Ends — Earl Gumnick, Tom MacDonald, 
Mark Seward and Luther Conrad. 

Tackles — Bill Eckman, Joe DePrimo and 
Lohr Dunlap. 

Guards — Frank Maxson, John Sansone 
and George Pappas. 

Centers — Al Ruppersberger and Herb 
Carhart. 

Backs — Fred Bach, Harold Berry, Louis 
Chacos, John Gilmore, Ramon Grelecki, 
Herb Gunther and Joe Hoopengardner. 

It was a light and inexperienced bunch, 
with only six of them weighing over 180 
pounds, and Reginald Vincent, a tackle, 
who scaled 188 to be the heaviest, was out 
all season with a knee injury. A number of 
them, though, should be of real value to 
the varsity next Fall. 



Trackmen Have Listed 
Busy Indoor Season 

Maryland trackmen will take part in six 
indoor meets this season for the busiest 
season on the boards in years, and Jim Ke- 
hoe, Mason Chronister and some of the 
other stars already are in training. 

Joe Muprhy, Southern Conference 
champion sprinter and outstanding back 
on the Terp football team, is resting a bit 
before taking up track work. 

Maryland's indoor schedule: 
Feb. 3 — Millrose Games in New York 
Feb. 9 — Penn A. C. Games in 

Philadelphia 
Feb. 10 — Maryland Fifth Regiment 

Games in Baltimore 
Feb. 17 — New York A. C. Games in 

New York 
Feb. 24 — Southern Conference cham- 
pionship meet in Chapel Hill, 
N. C. 
Mar. 2 — Catholic University Games 
in Washington. 



Gridmen And Harriers Are Honored At Banquet 



Maryland's football and cross country 
squads were given a banquet at the Hotel 
Shoreham in Washington on December 1 1 
at which 23 gridders, three managers and 
six harriers were awarded "M"s. 

It was a popular affair, as everyone 
brought his wife or best girl, speeches 
were barred and the evening was given 
over to entertainment and dancing. 

Chief Tydings dropped in and in a few 
impromptu words praised the gridders for 
their ability, courage and spirit. 

Those to receive grid letters were: 

Ends — Francis Beamer, Frank Dwyer, 
Dick Shaffer and Leo Mueller. 

Tackles — Ralph Albarano, Bob Brown, 
Bill Krouse and Ralph Burlin. 

Guards — George Lawrence, Ed Lloyd, 
George Gienger and John Morton. 

Centers — Bob Smith and Jim Wharton. 

Backs — Frank Skotnicki, John Boyda, 
Pershing Mondorff, Joe Murphy, Milton 
Lumsden, Bemie Ulman, Jack Warfield, 
Mearle DuVall and Fred Weidener. 

Manager Norman Miller and Harold 
Axtell, freshman manager. 

Jim Kehoe, Mason Chronister, Tom 
Fields, Randall Cronin, Dick Sullivan, 



Bob Montgomery and Manager William 
McManus were the harriers rewarded. 

Beamer, Albarano, Brown, Lawrence, 
Lloyd, Boyda, Skotnicki and Mondorff 
will be lost to the grid team and all got 
gold footballs for three years' service. 

Manager Miller also got this award. 

President Byrd and those intimately 
connected with athletics only were pres- 
ent in addition to the athletes. 



Dobson Gets Position 

Frank Dobson, who stepped out as Terp 
football coach directly following the close 
of the season after a five-year association 
with Athletics at Maryland, has been 
named grid mentor and athletic director 
at the Apprentice School of Newport 
News, Va. 

Dobson now is on a visit to the Pacific 
Coast and will take up his new duties 
about the middle of February. 

Before going west, Dobson was given a 
bon-voyage dinner in Washington. Among 
his gifts was a gold football from the Mary- 
land Athletic Board. 



10 



Maryland Alumni News 



Naval Training 

proximately a year's training, the Naval 
Reserve aviator receives his "Wings", and 
is promoted to the rank of Ensign, and is 
sent to one of the Fleet squadrons. After 
three years of duty with the Fleet, the avi- 
ator may return to civilian life with a sub- 
stantial gratuity, or may elect to remain 
longer on active duty, being promoted to 
junior grade Lieutenant. 

During the four years of Naval Reserve 
duty, a young man may learn very thor- 
ouglilv the essentials of a career in avia- 
tion, and the varied experience that the 
Navy offers in addition to the splendid 
training course is an inducement that is 
attracting a number of the finest graduates 
of our colleges in this District. 

The results of the Aviation Cadet pro- 
gram, which has been in action for about 
four vcars, prove that it is a most desirable 
training for young college men. Those 
graduates of the training who have elected 
to return to civilian life have found little 
difficultv in obtaining good positions in the 
aeronautical industry. The Navy Depart- 
ment also helps the Reserve officer in this 
particular. 

Full details may be obtained from the 
Commanding Officer, U. S. Naval Reserve 
Aviation Base, Washington (Anacostia), 
D. C. 

Norfolk 

Among those present were: Capt. T. G. 
Crapstcr. '96, Dr. f. R. Parker, '98, Dr. L. 
L. Sawyer, '90, Dr. W. G. Matney, Mr. 
T. V. Downing, '20, Dr. R. C. Gilliam. 
Dr. N. G. Wilson, '95, Dr. Frank Wilson, 
'08, Dr. J. G. Jackson, Dr. R. F. Simmons. 
Dr. J. P. Bradshavv. Dr. C. B. Gifford, 
Dr. S. R. Donohoe. '02. Dr. J. C. Clarke, 
Dr. George A. Duncan, Mr. Arthur Jett, 




Ideal place to entertain 
friends oi relatives. 



Headquarters 
for Good Times ! 

For your convention, banquet or 
dance . . . whatever the occasion, 
you'll find that the Lord Balti- 
more's exceptional services and 
facilities will make it a long- 
remembered success. 700 com- 
^j fortable rooms, two restaurants, 
bars and luxurious Cocktail 
Lounge at your service. 

$3 TO $6 SINGLE *» 



:LORD BALTIMORE 





BALTIMORE 



MARYLAND 



Dr. Ben Costenbader, Dr. Harry Aks, Dr. 
Archibald Burfoot, '06, Dr. James E. Diehl, 
'11, Rev. R. W. Sonen, '34, Mr. Edward 
Truitt, Dr. R. B. Tovvill, Mr. Ben Wilson, 
Dr. A. A. Parker, '04, Mr. C. H. Shafer, 
Jr., '38, and Dr. Applegate, '96, D.D.S. 
Other members of the University of 
Marvland delegation were Mr. George 
Fogg, '26, Miss Adele Stamp, '23, 
Miss Edith Frothingham, Miss Frances 
Ide, Miss Lucille Laws, '36, Mrs. H. T. 
Casbarian, Mrs. T. B. Avcock, and G. F. 



illock. 



i), 



Alumni secretary. 



Married — Ellen F. Ensor, '35, is mar- 
ried to Melvin Courtney Lankford, '37. 
The wedding took place on Thursday, No- 
vember 23rd, at Sparks, Md. The couple 
are At Home at 202 Aigburth Road, Tow- 
son, Md. 

o 

Married — Mr. Charles B. Orcutt, '37, 
to Miss Elizabeth Hinegardner. Mr. and 
Mrs. Orcutt are living in Ithaca, New 
York, where Charles Orcutt is employed 
by the Agriculture Department, Aerial 
Mapping Division. 



CUT ON THIS LINE 



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CHRISTMAS CHESTERFIELDS IN' ATTRACTIVE GIFT CARTON'S 



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ALUMNI 
NEWS 



JANUARY 
1940 



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Upper Left — John Munski, of Missouri, winning Governor'* Mile: Center — Bill Fitzpatrick, of Montgomery-Blair 
High, doing six feet for second place in scholastic high jump; Right — Alan Miller, of Maryland, taking 440 collegiate. 

Second Row, Left — Phil Graves, Mason Chronister, Jim Morrison, George Connolly and Munski at start of Governor's 
mile. 

Lower Left — Frank Fuller, of Virginia, setting record in capturing 70-yard hurdles; Right — Howard Jensen, of Passon 
A. C, Philadelphia, breaking mark in pole vault. 

These events took place last March 11 
in the Baltimore Armory 

xMaryland Fifth-Regiment Games 



This year this attractive annual affair will be held 

AT THE SAME PLACE ON J?^^ ft 




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Volume XI 



MARYLAND ALUMNI NFAVS, JANUARY, 1940 



Number 8 



Alumni Association — University of Maryland 

Founded in 1892 



OFFICERS FOR 1939-40 

Charles W. Sylvester, '08, Preside/if 
Baltimore, Md. 

P. W. Chichester, '20, First Vice-President Frederick, Md. 

H. W. Burnside, '04, Second Vice-President Washington, D. C. 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Secretary-Treasurer College Park. Md. 

ALUMNI BOARD 
(Note — The officers named above are also members of the Alumni Board) 

J. Donald Kieffer, '30 Arts and Sciences 

Charles V. Koons, '29 Engineering 

R. R. Lewis, '19 Education 

Iohn A. Silkman, '35 Agriculture 

Rith Miles, '31 Home Economics 

Norwood Sothoron, '34 Commerce 

MEMBERS AT LARGE 

E. E. Powell, '13; Philip Wertheimer, '29 Men's Representatives 

Mary York Gadd, '28; Gertrude Chesnut, '27 . Women's Representatives 

C. Walter Cole, '21 Immediate Past President 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Editor 

Maryland Alumni News, issued monthly by the University of Maryland Alumni Associa- 
tion at College Park, Md.. as second-class matter under the Act ol Congress, March 3. 1N7'<. 

Annual Alumni Association dues are $2.00. One year's subscription to Alumni Ntws. 
50 cents. 

GROUP LEADERS 

ALLEGANY COUNTY: E. Brooke Whitting, '98. President; Dr. Joseph Franklin. '21, Secretary. 
Cumberland. Md. 

BALTIMORE COUNTY: C. Walter Cole, '21, President; H. B. Derrick, '17. Secretary, Towson. 
Maryland. 

BALTIMORE CITY: Chester Tawney. '31. President, 4022 Roland Avenue; E. Gordon Ham- 
mond. '34. Secretary, 1023 W. Barre Street. Baltimore. Md. 

CAROLINE COUNTY: George W. Clendaniel. "20. President; Dr. Maurice A. Brackett. '21. 
Treasurer; Mrs. George W. Clendaniel. '21, Secretary, all of Denton. Md. 

HARFORD COUNTY: W. B. Munnikhuysen, '14. President; H. M. Carroll, '20. Secretary. 
Bel Air. Md. 

FREDERICK COUNTY: J. Homer Remsberg, '18. President; Henry R. Shoemaker. '17. Sec- 
retary. Frederick. Md. 

MONTGOMERY COUNTY: Lawrence G. Smoot. '18. President, Kensington. Md.; Mary Fisher. 
'36. Secretary, Rockville, Md. 

NEW YORK CITY: Mr. James E. Dingman. '21, President, 32 Sixth Avenue; Sarah Morris, '25, 
Secretary. 310 East 44th Street, New York City. 

PHILADELPHIA: A. Moulton McNutl. '06. President. 413 Cooper Street. Camden. N. J.; J. P. 
Mudd. '07. Secretary. 174 Manheim Street. Philadelphia. Pa. 

PITTSBURGH: E. Minor Wenner, '27. President. 1111 Gladys Avenue; Dr. A. A. Krieger. '32. 
Secretary Highland Building. Pittsburgh, Pa. 

WASHINGTON. D. C: J. Douglas Wallop. '19. President. 6139 N. Dakota Avenue, N.W.; 
Charles V. Koons, '29. Secretary, 419 Fourth Street, N.E., Washington. 

WASHINGTON COUNTY: Hon. Henry Holzapfel. Jr., '93, President. Hagerstown, Md.; L. G. 
Mathias. '23. Secretary, Hagerstown, Md. 

"M" CLUB OFFICERS AND BOARD MEMBERS 

A. K. Besley, '23 President Dr. E. N. Cory, '09 . . .Secretary-Treas. 

|ames W. Stevens, '19 Vice-President G. F. Pollock, '23 Historian 

REPRESENTATIVES 

Mike Stevens. '37 Baseball James Shumate, '20 Tennis 

W. C. Supplee, '26 Basketball John Gadd, '27 Cross Country 

Stewart McCaw, '35 Boxing Lewis W. Thomas, '28 Football 

E. E. Powell, '14 Lacrosse Dr. E. B. Friedenwald, '03 1 . , 

Roger Whiteford, '28 Track Dr. A. W. Valentine, '04 f At Lar ^ e 



Cover Picture 

This picture shows the Ritchie Coliseum 
where all indoor athletic events are held. 
This is also where the winter spectacle, 
All-Universitv Night, is presented. More 
than two hundred students participate in 
the parade of extra-curricular events, plus a 
basket ball game and boxing match. The 
capacity of the building now is approxi- 
mated five thousand for the boxing events. 
Plans are under way to increase the num- 
ber of seats, as frequently every seat is sold 
for the double events. Everv seat is a good 
seat and Ritchie Coliseum is one of the 
best sports arenas in the vicinity of Wash- 
ington. 



My Alumni Friends: 

One hundred and thirty-three years is a 
long time, but that is the number of years 
which our Alma Mater has rendered such 
valuable and lasting service to the people 
of our state. As has 
been the custom for 
several years, our 
fellow Alumni 
members and their 
friends gathered at 
the Lord Baltimore 
Hotel in Baltimore 
on January 20th, 
1940, to 'celebrate 
in due fashion the 
founding of our 
great University and 
to appropriately rec- 
ognize another 
milestone in its history of accomplishment. 
A fine spirit of fellowship continues to 
grow between the various Alumni associa- 
tions of the University. Let us each and 
every one endeavor to strengthen those 
bonds and look to the amalgamation and 
unification of all groups in the interest of 
a greater University of Maryland. 

What was vour New Year's resolution 
with regard to Maryland? Are you attend- 
ing its various activities? Are you support- 
ing and cooperating with our Alumni As- 
sociation? Maryland needs you and our as- 
sociation wants your moral and active sup- 
port and financial aid. 

Alumni of Maryland, get in the stride 
and give at least a penny a day or a dime 
or a dollar to provide adequate finances in 
a proper way. Look now to the future! 

The Annual Indoor Track Meet at the 
Fifth Regiment Armory in Baltimore on 
February 10 should interest you. It is a 
growing event and promises to be larger 
and better each year. 

(Continued on page 5) 




Views From Charter 'Day 




Maryland Alumni News 



Fellowship Helps Celebrate Charter Day; 

Dental School One Hundred Years Old 



Amidst a spirit of fellowship more than 
a thousand Alumni, faculty, and friends of 
the University gathered at the Lord Bal- 
timore Hotel on January 20 to celebrate 
the 133rd observance of Charter Day. Also 
special observance was accorded the Cen- 
tenary Celebration of the Dental School, 
which is the oldest in the world. Reserva- 
tions were received from as far away as 
Texas. Massachusetts and New York. Sev- 
eral classes held reunions and faculty be- 
came "old pals" with returning grads. 
Gov. O'Conor Guest Of Honor 

His Excellency Herbert R. O'Conor. '20. 
LL.B.. was guest of honor: Dr. H. C. 
Byrd. 'OS, host. Former Governor Harry 
W. Nice. '99, LL.B.. was his natural self 
as toastmaster. The Honorable Clifton A. 
Woodrum. Virginia Representative in 
Congress, was the guest speaker. Dr. J. Ben 
Robinson. 14. D.D.S., Dean of the Den- 
tal School, gave a brief historv of the ori- 
gin of dentistrv and the Centennial Cele- 
bration. General Chairman for the occa- 
sion was Dr. Daniel F. Lvnch, '23, D.D.S., 
of Washington. He was ablv assisted bv 
Dr. T. B. Aycock, '24, M.D., vice-chair- 
man. Mine. Elvina Orlicz-Dresszer. widow 
of the former Air Minister of Poland, gave 
vocal selections. 

Senators Present 

Other prominent national and state of- 
ficials present were Senator Millard E. 
Tydings, TO, LL.B., Senator George L. 
Radeliffe, '03, LL.B.. Hon. Howard Bruce, 
of Baltimore, Acting Mavor Richard 
O'Connell, of Baltimore, Congressman 
Lansdale G. Sasscer, Congressman Thomas 
D'Alessandro, Speaker of the House of Del- 
egates, Hon. Thomas E. Conlon, Dr. W. 
W. Skinner, '94, Chairman of the Board 
of Regents. Gen. Milton A. Reckord, and 
Hon. J. Milton Patterson. 

Nice In Good Form 

Toastmaster Nice was in his best form 
and kept the jovial spirit at a high level 
by his wit and humor. When introduced 
by the Chairman and receiving tremendous 
applause, he replied, "I appreciate the ap- 
plause," and looking blandly at the ball- 
room ceiling "and I hope that it won't 
die before November of this vear." It is 



rumored that Mr. Nice will be a candidate 
for the United States Senate in the fall 
election and this was probablv his first 
public indications. 

Byrd Praises Alumni 

Dr. Bvrd expressed his gratitude to the 
Alumni and faculty for the part they are 
taking in the progress of our Alma Mater. 
He gave assurance that the Universitv was 
not heading toward over expansion by 
stating "fears had been expressed, not with- 
out some foundation, that our Universitv 
was planning to expand to a size where the 
state could not afford to support it. We 
arc going to meet such criticisms and defi- 
nitely allav them for all time. We are 
working on a complete new program which 
will be released probably within the next 
six months. The Alumni and friends will 
receive this plan which will be open to 
criticisms, and we want them," continued 
President Bvrd. 

O'Conor Pledges Cooperation 

Following Dr. Byrd, Governor O'Con- 
or seconded his remarks and assured him 
of wholehearted cooperation. "The peo- 
ple of Marvland are readv at all times to 
cooperate," Governor O'Conor said. "Each 
and every act of Dr. Bvrd's has been for 
the development of the Universitv entirelv 
within proper limits and within reason." 
the Governor concluded. 

Congressman Woodrum Speaker 

"American Frontiers" was the topic of 
the guest speaker, the Hon. Clifton A. 
Woodrum. Virginia Representative in 
Congress. Miltiarv, economic and spiritual 
frontiers were the major fronts needing the 
serious and concerted consideration of the 
people. There is "onlv one peace argu- 
ment, only one peace appeal that will make 
any impression on dictators — that is the 
fellow who has just a bit bigger gun," said 
Mr. Woodrum. 

Much of the evening applause was go- 
ing to Mr. Nice for his jovial wit and hu- 
mor in remarks about speakers and others 
that Congressman Woodrum spoke of him 
as "Mr. Roastmaster," also that he had 
greatly enjoyed the "delightful and enter- 
taining filibuster." 



Dental Centenary Observed 

Dr. J. Ben Robinson, a graduate of the 
Dental School and now Dean of the Den- 
tal School, gave a splendid review of dental 
history in observance of the Centenary Cel- 
ebration, which will be held in March. A 
fellow graduate. Dr. B. Lucien Brun. is the 
general chairman of the celebration. 

The Rev. Edward B. Bunn, S.J., Presi- 
dent of Lovola College, pronounced the 
invocation. 

A number of people prominent in the 
civic life of our state were present. 
Out-of-Town Visitors 

Several telegrams from well wishers were 
read. Congressman W. P. Cole. '10, 
in California at the time, did not forget 
the occasion. He telegraphed his wishes. 

Groups from out of state were repre- 
sented by Dr. Charles H. Lupton, '16, of 
Norfolk, Virginia; Mr. A. Moulton Mc- 
Nutt, '06. of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 
and Mr. Douglas Wallop. '19, of Wash- 
ington. D. C. Dr. Arnold, D.D.S., of Tex- 
as, made reservations but was unable to 
attend. Dancing followed the banquet to 
the tunes of The Townsmen. Friendliness 
and genuine fellowship continued to make 
again an "old pal party" of the occasion. 

Those who did not attend missed a good 
evening, so make vour plans now to be 
present next vear. 



Green Keepers 



\\ hen the annual meeting of the Green 
Keepers' Association was held at College 
Park, an Old Liner visited the Alumni Of- 
fice, Alton Rabbitt, '37, now with the De- 
partment of Interior as supervisor of lawns. 
Alton married Estella Remley. '34. and 
thev reside in Arlington, Virginia. 



My Alumni Friends: 

The All-University Night at College 
Park on February 1" will be a gorgeous af- 
fair and standing room will be at a pre- 
mium. Get vour tickets early and be sure of 
a seat. 

Cordially yours, 

Charles W. Sylvester, 

President. 



January, 1940 



Prof. Metzger Dies 
While On Vacation 



A friend long to be remembered has 
been called from our midst. Professor Ja- 
cob Elry Metzger died December 25 while 
on a vacation in Florida. Taken with a 
heart attack while driving, he reached the 
hotel but was immediately transferred to 
a hospital, where he died. He was accom- 
panied by Mrs. Metzger. At the time of 
his death heart specialists from the Uni- 
versity Hospital were making ready to fly 
to Florida. 

Professor Metzger was Director of the 
Agricultural Experiment Station for the 
State of Maryland. He graduated from 
Pennsylvania State College in 1911, came 
to College Park in 1914, and organized the 
Department of Agricultural Education and 
Summer School. He was also supervisor of 
the Agricultural Department of the Mary- 
land High Schools for the State Depart- 
ment of Public Instruction. Three years 
later he was made head of the Agronomy- 
Department, also agronomist for the Ex- 
periment Station. 

Made Director 

In 1935 he was appointed Assistant Di- 
rector of the Experiment Station and in 
1937 was appointed Acting Director, as a 
successor to Dr. H. J. Patterson, retired. 
In 1939 he was made full director of the 
oldest established Experiment Station in 
the United States. 

Professor Metzger was an outstanding 
man in his field, being well known locally 
and beyond the boundaries of Maryland. 
He was particularly interested in research 
and gave special attention to soils and 
agronomy. Many bulletins and articles were 
authored by him. His experimental efforts 
in the development of the "barbless" bar- 
ley, gained for him noteworthy prominence 
in the national agricultural industry. 
Went To South America 

In 1930 he was United States Represen- 
tative at the One Hundredth Anniversarv 
of Natural Nitrates, held at Santiago, Chile, 
South America. 

In addition, Professor Metzger kept ac- 
tive contacts with other university and civ- 
ic matters. He served the University as a 
member of the Athletic Board and the 
Scholarship Committee for many years. 
He was a Past President of the Prince 
George's County Kiwanis Club and a 



HOPKINS APPOINTMENT 

During the past year a new professor 
was appointed in the School of Hygiene 
and Public Health at the Johns Hopkins 
University. The appointee to fill this po 
sition was Dr. Thomas Borne Turner, a 
graduate of our Medical School. Dr. Tur- 
ner, who was born in Calvert County, 
Maryland, took his B.S. at St. John's Col- 
lege. From 1927 to 1932 he was Jacques 
Loeb Fellow and instructor and associate 
in medicine at the Johns Hopkins Medi- 
cal School. In the latter year he joined the 
staff of the International Health Division 
of the Rockefeller Foundation and for the 
past three years he has been assigned by 
the Foundation to the School of Hygiene 
and Public Health at Hopkins, where he 
has engaged in post-graduate teaching and 
research in syphilis. He assumed his new 
position on September first. 

POULTRY BUILDING 

The Poultry Department has moved in- 
to a new building which is equipped with 
numerous laboratories and several class- 
rooms. Some chickens will be kept in the 
building for experimental purposes. One 
of the most interesting features of the new 
edifice will be an exhibition of eggs, not 
just ordinary eggs, but eggs that have taken 
prizes all over the state at one time or an- 
other. The collection of eggs is over four 
hundred in number. The dedication of the 
building took place July 26 when over 
4,000 people flooded the campus to exam- 
ine the Poultry Department, enroute to a 
World Poultry Convention in Cleveland, 
Ohio. 

• 

Alumni Board 
Member Marries 

Miss Ruth Miles, '30, a member of A. 
O. Pi, and Mr. James B. Henderson were 
married December 27, last. Ruth is a mem- 
ber of the Alumni Board as a representa- 
tive of the College of Home Economics. 
The newlvweds are residing in Baltimore. 
• 

member of the Mount Herman Masonic 
Lodge. He is survived by his widow, Mrs. 
Jane Butts Metzger, and a brother, Dr. 
Irvin Metzger, a resident of Pittsburgh. 

On behalf of the Alumni Association, 
the News wishes to express sincere con- 
dolence to Mrs. Metzger, Dr. Metzger, and 
their many friends. 



Dr. Bay Succumbs 
To Heart Attack 

Dr. Robert P. Bay, '05, an eminent 
Alumnus of the Medical School, died Jan- 
uary 1, as the result of a heart attack. He 
was visiting a friend when taken and never 
regained consciousness. 

Dr. Bay had long been an outstanding 
surgeon. At the time of his death, he was 
Chief of Staff at the Maryland General 
Hospital. 

His Alma Mater was the beneficiary of 
his interest and enthusiasm for the ad 
vancement of the Alumni Association. He 
served a term as President of the Medical 
Alumni Association, was Professor of Oral 
Surgery, and was always active in the an- 
nual Charter Day arrangements. At the 
time of his death, he was serving as Chair- 
man of the Reception Committee. 

He had held the position of Chairman of 
City Charities and was interested in innu- 
merable civic activities. He was active in 
numerous medical societies. He wrote a 
number of papers on medical subjects. Dr. 
Bay was a man's man, a good sport, a ra- 
conteur of much charm, with a legion of 
friends in all walks of life. 

The loss of Dr. Bay was greater than a 
few words can express. His prestige in his 
profession was known far and wide. 

Interment was made at Delta, Pa. 

On behalf of the Alumni Association 
the News takes this occasion to express 
sincere condolence to his bereaved family. 



Engaged — Sarah Louise Short, '34, and 
a member of Alpha Omicron Pi, is en 
gaged to marry Mr. Norbert F. Sherman 
of Cumberland, Md. Sarah was quite a 
student leader in her undergraduate days, 
winning membership in the national hon- 
orary fraternity, Phi Kappa Phi. She resides 
in College Park. 

O 

Married — Two members of the class of 
'38, Miss Lois Mary Kuhn and Paul R. 
Pcffcr, are now Mr. and Mrs. Lois is a 
member of Kappa Kappa Gamma and Paul 
a member of Alpha Tau Omega. The new 
lyweds are residing in Washington. They 
recently visited the campus and attended 
the Christmas Rossborough Dance. 



Maryland Alumni News 



Kappas To Celebrate 
Beginning Of Sigma Delta 

On February 21, at the Kenesaw Apart- 
ments in Washington, D. C, Kappa Kappa 
Gamma Sorority will celebrate the Twen- 
tieth Anniversary of the founding of Sig- 
ma Delta in 1920. Sigma Delta, with its 
colors of blue and gold and a white lily 
as its flower, was the local chapter before 
it became Kappa in 1929 on the campus. 

For this celebration charter members of 
Sigma Delta, Alumnae and active members 
of Kappa Kappa Gamma will be present. 
Elizabeth Hook Day, '20, the first woman 
graduate of the College Park School, was 
the first President of Sigma Delta. Mrs. 
Day, along with Miss Wilette Bland, '21, 
Mrs. Letha Edmonds Clendaniel, '21, 
Miss Helena Avery, '22, Mrs. Huldah En- 
sor, '22, Mrs. Rebecca Tarbert Groton, 
'22, Mrs. Gladys Crowthers Briden, '23, 
Miss Herminia Ellis, '23, and Mrs. Au- 
drey Killian Zulick. '23, will be charter 
members present at the occasion. In addi- 
tion, Kappa is making an effort to have 
present all past Presidents of the Sigma 
Delta and Kappa Chapter. About 125 are 
expected to attend the banquet and an in- 
teresting program has been arranged, in- 
cluding a resume of the activities of Sigma 
Delta Chapter, which will be of great in- 
terest to the active Kappa Chapter. 

The Active Chapter of Kappa Kappa 
Gamma has forty-one members, and is 
headed by Tempe Curry, President, of Be- 
thesda, Maryland. 

• 

Addresses — 

Xorborne Hite, Southern States Coop- 
erative, Roanoke, Va. 

John Baden, Southern States Coopera- 
tive, Bel Air, Md. 

C. C. Astle, Cooperative S. S. Fertilizer 
Service, Curtis Bav, Md. 
o 

Birth — Dr. and Mrs. E. B. Daniels have 
a young son. Dr. Daniels is a former mem- 
ber of the University of Maryland faculty. 
Mrs. Daniels was formerly Marion Bates, 
of A. O. Pi. 



Married — Miss Mary Teresa McQuillan 
is married to Mr. George J. O'Hare, '31. 
The wedding took place on Wednesday, 
November 2, 1939, at St. Peter's Church, 
Washington, D. C. 



President "M" Club 1939-40 




Dr. KirkJand Besley, '23 



Stock Judging Team 
Wins Eastern Contest 

When the Eastern States Exposition 
was held at Springfield, Massachusetts, last 
fall, the Old Line team won first place in 
the Dairy Cattle Judging Contest. Their 
opponents were representatives from all 
state institutions in the East. The team 
also won first place in Ayrshires, third in 
Brown Swiss, third in Jersevs, fourth in 
Guernseys, and seventh in Holsteins. The 
members of the team were Mason Butler, 
from Dickerson, Maryland; William V. 
Redding and Robert L. Stevens, both of 
Street, Maryland, and Louis Ahalt, of 
Middletown, as alternate. Butler was high 
man in the Ayrshire contest. Redding and 
Ahalt arc members of Alpha Gamma Rho 
fraternity. 



Grapevine News About Those We Know 



Oklahoma — At Fort Sill, Oklahoma, an 
Alumni reunion was held when Marjorie 
(nee Higgins, '37) and Lou Ennis, of the 
U. S. Marine Corps, entertained Bob Wal- 
ton, '38, and Gordon Wood, of the U. S. 
A. Flying School from Fort Sam Houston, 
Texas. It seems that Bob and his friend, 
Lieutenant Wood, flew to Fort Sill on a 
week-end trip, looked up the Ennises, and 
the reunion was on. Lou, a lieutenant in 
the U. S. Marine Corps, is at Fort Sill in 
the Artillery School. He is, however, being 
transferred to Ouantico, Virginia, on Feb- 
ruarv 1, for special training. Soon they will 
be visiting College Park. 



Birth — Mr. and Mrs. William C. 
Needham announce the arrival of Wil- 
liam Lovell, weighing eight pounds, elev- 
en ounces, on January 6, at the Universi- 
ty Hospital, Baltimore. He looks like a 
good halfback in the making! Mrs. Need- 
ham is the former Marion Parker, '36, of 
Kappa Kappa Gamma. Bill was in the 
class of '34 and a member of Phi Sigma 
Kappa. Both parents were well known for 
their work with the student newspaper, 
The Diamondback. The Needhams reside 
in the Northwood Apartments in Balti- 
more. Bill now is with the Associated 
Press in Baltimore. 



Wedding-To-Be— Joseph N. Sanford, 
'28, son of Joseph W. Sanford, '08, and 
Miss Madeleine Dunne, sister of Miss 
Theresa Dunne, '32, will be married in 
February. Joe, a member of Delta Sigma 
Phi, is the Police Court Chief Probation 
Officer for the District of Columbia. Many 
farewell parties have been given Joe by his 
friends about College Park. The young 
couple will reside at 5522 Smallwood 
Drive, Green Acres, Maryland. 



Birth — Mr. and Mrs. C. R. Wilson are 
the proud parents of a baby girl, Minna 
Vivian, born October 16, 1939. The moth- 
er, formerly Minna Cannon, '32, an A. O. 
Pi, is principally remembered as Secretary 
of the Student Government Association 
and Women's Editor of the Reveille. Mr. 
Wilson is a member of the District of Co- 
lumbia Bar. 

O 

Radio — From out in the regions of Chi- 
cago came a report that an Alumnus heard 
the radio broadcast by the University Glee 
Club on the National Farm Hour. Mrs. 
Frank Blood, nee Dorothy Miles, A. O. Pi, 
'36, now residing in Chicago, wrote about 
her treat in hearing the broadcast, which 
came direct from the campus. Did any 
other Alumnus hear the broadcast? 



January, 1940 



Old Line Athletic Contributions 



By W. H. ("Bill") HOTTER 




FIVE MARYLAND ACES IN THIS PACK (left to right): Joe Murphy, sprinter; Alan Miller. 4-10; Jim Kehoe, 880; Mason Chronister, 
mile; Tom Fields, two miles. All hold Southern Conference indoor titles and Kehoe and Chronister have been competing with the 
best in big northern meets with success. Kehoe ran second to Glenn Cunningham in one 880 race, was third in a classy field 
in another, while Chronister did likewise in a mile which the great Kansan won. All will compete in Baltimore on February 10. 



National Stars In Maryland-Fifth Regiment Meet 



Bigger and better than ever! That is 
the outlook for the University of Mary- 
land-Fifth Regiment Annual Invitational 
Indoor Track Carnival at the spacious Bal- 
timore Armory on Saturday' night, Febru- 
ary 10. 

Geary Eppley, Terp Athletic Director 
and chairman of the games committee, is 
enthused over the fact that the Governor's 
Mile, the headliner, and the A. A. U. two- 
mile event, feature of that section, already 
have enough stars listed to insure them of 
being great attractions. 

Olympians Are Listed 

Tommy Deckard, ex-Indianian and 
former Big Ten champ, and Joe McClus- 
key of the New York A. C, both Olym- 
pians and among the leading middle dis- 



tance aces of the world, will run in both 
of these events. 

Jim Davis of North Carolina and Mason 
Chronister of Maryland, Southern Con- 
ference outdoor and indoor champions, re- 
spectively, and Gerald Tarrant of Penn A. 
C, are among those who will help set a 
fast pace in the Governor's Mile. 

Phil Graves, formerly of the New York 
A. C. and now a freshman at Georgetown, 
and Tommy Fields of Maryland, victor 
and runner-up last year, should force Mc- 
Cluskev and Deckard in the two-mile test. 
Deckard Is Newcomer 

Deckard will be neyv to the meet, but 
McCluskey spiced two other affairs. He 
won both the Governor's Mile and tyvo 
miles in 1937 and in 1938 ran next to 



Norman Bright in the latter when the San 
Francisco ace set a great record of 9:08 
for the event. 

Chronister and Tarrant played a part in 
pressing John Munski of Missouri to a 
record 4:13.5 in the Governor's Mile last 
year. Chronister finished second and Tar- 
rant fourth. Jim Kehoe, another Terp ace, 
who ran second last year, will step in the 
Oriole 660, another topline special, which 
was won last March by Bill Hendrix of 
North Carolina. 

Battle For Trophies 

There should be a merry battle for the 

intercollegiate and A. A. U. trophies, with 

stellar talent being provided for both by 

North Carolina, Georgetown, Navy, Vir- 

( Continued on Page 10) 



X 



Maryland Alumni News 



Basketers Doing Much 
Better Than Hoped 

Maryland's basket ball team, on a South- 
ern jaunt for five games at the time this 
was rattled oft the typewriter, was to re- 
sume its home battling with a game with 
Johns Hopkins in Ritchie Coliseum on 
February 3 in a twin bill in which the 
boxers also were to battle the powerful 
Virginia team. 

The Terps' trip to Dixie included Con- 
ference games with North Carolina State. 
Clemson, the loop champion; South Caro- 
lina and Duke, and a non-Conference bat- 
tle with Virginia on the way home. 

Beats Some Good Teams 

When the Terps hiked South thev had 
won eight of eleven games and had taken 
four out of five they had played within | 
the Conference, to be tied with Duke for 
second place. North Carolina was leading 
with a clean slate of five victories. 

Conference wins had been scored over 
Clemson, Duke, Richmond and Virginia 
Polv, with Washington and Lee inflicting 
the lone defeat. 

Rutgers and Georgetown were among 
the main victims in the contests outside 
of the Conference. 

DeWitt Is Terp Ace 

George DeW'itt, a junior, has been the 
pace setter of the team. Mearlc DuVall. 
a soph, and DeW'itt's running mate in the 
forward jobs; Charlev Weidinger, center. 
and Pershing Mondorff and Milton Mu 
litz, guards, are the other usual starters. 
All of the last three are seniors. 

Burt Shipley and Jack Faber have done 
a fine job of coaching to get the Terps off 
so well, as the team at the outset did not 
figure to garner more than half its games. 

Lack of capable reserves make the going 
tough, as most of the enemy are much 
better fortified in this way. 



ENNIS IS HEARD FROM 

John E. Funis, who managed the var- 
sity football team in 1924, now is located 
in San Diego, Calif., from where he sent 
in his subscription to the Alumni News. 

January, 1940 



TOPNOTCH TERPS 




GEORGE DeWITT 




NEWTON COX 




BOB BRADLEY 



Terp Ring Team Green 
But Gets Good Start 

While the Terp boxing team, with the 
aid of a forfeit in the 135-pound class, 
won its opening clash with Duke, 5 to 3, 
the match indicated that Coach Harvey 
L. (Heinie) Miller would have to do 
some tall hustling if the Southern Confer- 
ence championship is to be retained. 

Nate Askin, Maryland's 135-pounder, 
who did not have to fight against Duke, is 
able to take care of himself and doubtless 
would have won his bout had a foe been 
presented. 

Bradley Loses On Mistake 

Bob Bradley, Maryland's ace 127-pound- 
er, was the lad to have the hard luck. He 
was ahead bv a big margin in the early 
stages of the third round when a cut over 
his eye caused Referee Charley Short to 
stop the bout and give it to the Duke 
man. However, under the new rules, Brad- 
ley deserved the verdict, as the code speci- 
fies that if a bout is halted in either the 
second or third rounds for such a reason, 
that the boxer leading at that time shall be 
declared the winner. 

John Ham was impressive in winning 
in the 120-pound class, Izzy Alperstein 
showed much promise in scoring as a 145- 
pounder, and Newton Cox, 165-pound 
Conference champ, appeared greatly im- 
proved over 1939 when he took the title. 
Izzy Leites won the light-heavy bout, but 
must improve if he is to whip the men 
he'll meet in most of his future scraps. 
Five In First Bouts 

Morris Roseman, 155, and Bob Brown, 
218-pound grid tackle, stepping into the 
heavyweight breach, were losers, but still 
(Continued on Page 10) 



All-University Night 
Has Big Program 

Catholic University in basket ball and 
Western Maryland in boxing will provide 
the sports competition in annual All-Uni- 
versitv Night, to be held in Ritchie Col- 
iseum the night of February 17. 

Extra-curricular activities on the cam- 
pus, though, get the call over varsity ath- 
letics that night in a colorful program 
that will have the State of Maryland as 
its theme. 



New Head Grid Coach 
Not Yet Selected 

There had been no action as to a head 
coach of varsity football when this was 
typed. Spring practice is nearing and it 
may be that the tutors who are on the 
campus — Jack Faber, Al Heagy and Al 
Woods — will have to do this job at least. 
Faber and Heagy, however, have lacrosse 
to think about and unless someone is 
brought in within the next month, Woods 
may have to carry most of the task. 
• 

National Stars In Meet 

(Continued from Page 8) 
ginia, Pennsylvania, Duke, Maryland and 
others. Navy won the collegiate trophy 
and Passon A. C. of Philadelphia gained 
the A. A. U. award last year. 

Schoolboys from Maryland, District of 
Columbia and other points promise to 
make this division just as keen as the A. 
A. U. and collegiate sections. 

There are seven tests each for the col- 
legians and schoolboys and eight for the 
A. A. U. athletes. 

• 

Terp Ring Team Green 

(Continued horn Page 9) 
have the makings of topnotch boxers, de- 
spite their setbacks in their first varsity 
bouts. 

Ham, Alperstein and Leites also were 
battling on the varsity for the first time, 
so considering this and the Bradley inci- 
dent, Maryland did well to win at all. 

Benny Alperstein and Ivan Nedomat- 
sky, two Terp fistic grid greats who were 
graduated in 1939 and 1938, respectively, 
now are helping Miller and Maryland may 
be expected to improve greatly as the sea- 
son goes along. 




Ideal place to entertain 
friends or relatives. 



lb 

:LOR 



Headquarters 
for Good Times \ 

For your convention, banquet or 
dance . . . whatever the occasion, 
you'll find that the Lord Balti- 
more's exceptional services and 
facilities will make it a long- 
remembered success. 700 com- 
fortable rooms, two restaurants, 
bars and luxurious Cocktail 
Lounge at your service. 

$3 TO $6 SINGLE «• 




D BALTIMORE 

BALTIMORE. MARYLAND 



He did not state his connections. His 
home is in Pocomoke City, Md. 
• 
ITS BOB JOHNSON NOW 

Bobby Johnson, brother of Eddie, is a 
member of the Terp freshman basket ball 
squad and one of the best prospects to 
graduate to the varsity next year. He also 
plays baseball. These are the two sports 
in which Eddie, who was graduated last 
June, starred for three years. He's about 
like Eddie in build, only that he is a little 
heavier. 



Crime — Mr. Lee Pennington, '15, gave 
a talk on "The War on Crime" at the 
Social Problems Forum at the University. 
Mr. Pennington is emploved as an admin- 
istrative assistant to J. Edgar Hoover in 
the main offices of the Department of 
Justice in Washington. 
• 

Biologist— Dr. R. A. Olson, Ph.D., '39, 
has been appointed Associate Biologist at 
the Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, Sol- 
omons Island, to take the place of Dr. 
Littleford. 



CUT ON THIS LINE 



Will You 



Fellow Alumni: 

1 wish to be a contributing member of 
the University of Maryland Alumni As- 
sociation, and am enclosing the usual 
amount of $2.00 for the year 1939-1940, 
of this fifty cents is for one year's sub- 
scription to the Alumni News. 



ANCTHEC DRIVE IS CN 

Join Your Fellow Alumni 

=PLEASE FILL OUT AND RETURN THIS BLANK NOW ! 



Name. Class. 



Occupation 



Address. 



Married?. 



To whom Children 



Business address Title. 




All-University Night Attracts Throng 

Seventh Episode 

will be presented 

Saturday, February 17, 1940 

BASKET BALL 

Begins at 7 P. M. 
MARYLAND UNIVERSITY vs. CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY 

• 

BOXING 

MARYLAND UNIVERSITY vs. WESTERN MARYLAND 

Coeds 
FOR RESERVATIONS 

Write or Phone 

ATHLETIC OFFICE 
COLLEGE PARK 

• 

ALL SEATS RESERVED $1.10 

Enclose 15 cents per order for register. 




Hockey 





Watch the change to Chesterfield 

says DONNA DAE 

CHESTERFIELD'S JANUARY GIRL 

starring with 
FRED WARINGS PENNSYLVANIANS 




FORECASTING MORE SMOKING PLEASURE FOR 1940 



Copyright 1940, Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. 



Change to Chesterfields and you'll get 
what you want . . . real mildness and better taste. 
You can't buy a better cigarette. 




ALUMNI 
NEWS 



FEBRUARY 
1940 



i - S 

O .• : 
t. '>- 

<D 

<-i ) 

"J 

i— i 

' > 



DENTAL SCHOOL 



li e- [M * 



tloi* 








"Silk Stockings in the Morning? Imagine!" 



SILK stockings a luxury? Not today, but thev 
were 25 vears ago. So was an automobile, 
and a telephone. An incandescent lamp — not half 
so good as the one you now get for 15 cents — then 
cost more than twice as much. And you couldn't 
buy a radio or an electric refrigerator for love or 
money . 

These are only a few of the things we accept 
today as commonplace. We expect wide, smooth, 
well-lighted streets. We want automatic heat 
in our homes; we clean our rugs with vacuum 
cleaners. When we go to the dentist we expect 
him to use an electric drill; we accept without 
comment an X-ray examination as part of a 
medical check-up. Luxuries? Not at all; they're 
part of the American standard of living. 



How did they become common in so short a 
time? Not by some sudden change in our wealth 
and habits. It was through years of steady work 
by American industry -scientists, engineers, 
and skilled workmen developing new products, 
improving them, learning to make them less 
expensive so that more millions of people could 
enjoy them. And so, imperceptiblv, luxuries 
have changed to necessities. 

More than any other one thing, the increasing 
use of electricity in industry has helped in this 
progress. For more than 60 years, General Elec- 
tric men and women have pioneered in making 
electricitv more useful to the American people 
have led in creating More Goods for More 
People at Less Cost. 



G-E research and engineering have saved the public from ten to one hundred dollars 
for every dollar they have earned for General Electric 




GENERAL » ELECTRIC 



nil ii 



Volume XI 



MARYLAND ALUMNI NEWS, FEBRUARY, 1940 



Number 9 



Alumni Association — University of Maryland 

Founded in 1892 



OFFICERS FOR 1939 - 40 

Charles W. Sylvester, '08, President 
Baltimore, Md. 

P. W. Chichester, '20, First Vice-President Frederick, Md. 

H. W. Burnside, '04, Second Vice-President Washington, D. C. 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Secretary-Treasurer College Park, Md. 

ALUMNI BOARD 
(Note — The officers named above are also members of the Alumni Board) 

J. Donald Kieffer, '30 Arts and Sciences 

Charles V. Koons, '29 Engineering 

R. R. Lewis, '19 Education 

John A. Silkman, '35 Agriculture 

Ruth Miles, '31 Home Economics 

Norwood Sothoron, '34 Commerce 

MEMBERS AT LARGE 

E. E. Powell, '13; Philip Wertheimer, '29 Men's Representatives 

Mary York Gadd, '28; Gertrude Chesnut, '27 Women's Representatives 

C. Walter Cole, '21 Immediate Past President 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Editor 

Maryland Alumni News, issued monthly by the University of Maryland Alumni Associa- 
tion at College Park, Md., as second-class matter under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Annual Alumni Association dues are $2.00. One year's subscription to Alumni Nlws. 
50 cents. 

GROUP LEADERS 

ALLEGANY COUNTY: E. Brooke Whitting. '98, President; Dr. Joseph Franklin, '21, Secretary. 

Cumberland, Md. 
BALTIMORE COUNTY: C. Walter Cole, '21, President; H. B. Derrick, '17, Secretary, Towson. 

Maryland. 
BALTIMORE CITY: Chester Tawney, '31, President, 4022 Roland Avenue; E. Gordon Ham- 
mond, '34. Secretary, 1023 W. Barre Street, Baltimore. Md. 
CAROLINE COUNTY: George W. Clendaniel, '20, President; Dr. Maurice A. Brackett, '21. 

Treasurer; Mrs. George W. Clendaniel, '21, Secretary, all of Denton, Md. 
HARFORD COUNTY: W. B. Munnikhuysen, '14, President; H. M. Carroll, '20, Secretary. 

Bel Air, Md. 
FREDERICK COUNTY: Guy K. Motter, '05, LL.B., President; Miss Ann "Nancy" Anders. 

'39, Secretary, Frederick, Md. 
MONTGOMERY COUNTY: Lawrence G. Smoot, '18, President, Kensington, Md.; Mary Fisher, 

'36, Secretary, Rockville, Md. 
NEW YORK CITY: Mr. James E. Dingman, '21, President, 32 Sixth Avenue; Sarah Morris, '25, 

Secretary, 310 East 44th Street, New York City. 
PHILADELPHIA: A. Moulton McNutt, '66, President, 413 Cooper Street, Camden, N. J.; J. P. 

Mudd, '07, Secretary, 174 Manheim Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
PITTSBURGH: E. Minor Wenner, '27, President, 1111 Gladys Avenue; Dr. A. A. Krieger, '32. 

Secretary Highland Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
WASHINGTON, D. C: J. Douglas Wallop, '19, President, 6139 N. Dakota Avenue, N.W.; 

Charles V. Koons, '29, Secretary, 419 Fourth Street, N.E., Washington. 
WASHINGTON COUNTY: Hon. Henry Holzapfel, Jr., '93, President, Hagerstown, Md.; L. G. 

Mathias. '23. Secretary, Hagerstown, Md. 

"M" CLUB OFFICERS AND BOARD MEMBERS 

A. K. Besley, '23 President Dr. E. N. Cory, '09 Secretary-Treas. 

[ames W. Stevens, '19 Vice-President G. F. Pollock, '23 Historian 

REPRESENTATIVES 



Mike Stevens, '37 Baseball 

W. C. Supplee, '26 Basketball 

Stewart McCaw, '35 Boxing 

E. E. Powell, '14 Lacrosse 

Roger Whiteford, '28 Track 



James Shumate, '20 Tennis 

John Gadd, '27 Cross Country 

Lewis W. Thomas, '28 Football 

Dr. E. B. Friedenwald, '03 \ 
Dr. A. W. Valentine. '04 ] 



At Large 



Cover Picture 

Here you see the home of the first Den 
tal School in the world. One hundred 
years ago two men who were eminent in 
the dental profession had the beginning 
of their dream come true. This building 
was located at 13 South Sharp Street in 
the citv of Baltimore. It was then known 
as the Baltimore College of Dental Sur- 
gery, but today it is a part of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland Dental School. Gradu- 
ates from this school are among the out- 
standing men in the dental profession. 
These graduates, as well as all dentists, will 
gather in Baltimore to celebrate the begin- 
ning of education in their profession, on 
March IS, 19. 20, next month. 
• 

My Alumni Friends: 

The Charter Day Banquet is now a mat- 
ter of history. It was a grand affair. The 
dinner was delightful, the speeches of high 
calibre and the at- 
tendance excellent. 
I wish to say "thank 
you" most earnestly 
to everyone who as- 
sisted in making 
this another out- 
standing event. 

Look now to the 
Dental Centenary. 
Our Dental School 
is one of the finest 
in the world and its 
graduates are lead- 
ers in the profession, far and wide. Their 
Alumni Association is wholeheartedly back 
of all University activities and is certainly 
doing big things. The celebration which 
thev sponsor this year will be another gor- 
geous chapter in the historical events of 
Maryland. Let us all support the celebra 
tion in any way we can. 

On March 12, 1940, you will want to 
visit College Park to attend another even- 
ing of music. The program will present 
two nationally known artists, Frank La 
Forge, pianist, and Emma Otero, soloist, 
a coloratura soprano. This will be a real 
treat and you should make every effort to 
be present. 

May 31 will be Alumni Day this year. 
I wish everyone reading this letter would 
plan to meet with us this year. Why not 
work, and I mean work, to get out at least 
1,000 Alumni at our annual meeting? I 
am counting on YOU! 

Ciias. W. Sylvester, President. 




Dental Education Was Started 

One Hundred Years Ago in Baltimore 



The Baltimore College of Dental Sur- 
gery, one of Maryland's many glorious 
firsts, occupies an important and interest- 
ing place in the history of dentistry. At the 
end of the 1939-40 session it will have 
completed its one hundredth year of serv- 
ice to dental education. The Baltimore Col- 
lege of Dental Surgerv, founded by Horace 
II. Havden and Chapin A. Harris, repre- 
sents the first effort in history to offer in- 
stitutional dental education to those antici- 
pating the practice of dentistry. 

Dental Practice, 1800 
Dr. Horace II. Havden began the prac- 
tice of dentistry in Baltimore in 1800. 
From that time he made a zealous at 
tempt to lav the foundation for a scien- 
tific, serviceable dental profession. In 1831 
Dr. Chapin A. Harris came to Baltimore to 
study under Havden. Dr. Harris was a man 
of unusual ability and possessed special 
qualifications to aid in establishing and 
promoting formal dental education. It was 
Dr. Havden's idea that dental education 
merited greater attention than had been 
^i\en it by medicine or could be given it 
bv the preceptorial plan of dental teach- 
ing then in vogue. An independent col- 
lege was decided upon. A charter was ap- 
plied for and granted by the Maryland 
Legislature February 1, 1840. The first 
faculty meeting was held February 3, 1840, 
at which time Dr. Havden was elected 
President and Dr. Chapin A. Harris, Dean. 
The introductory lecture was delivered by 
Dr. Harris on November 3, 1840, to the 
five students matriculating in the first 
class. Thus was created as the foundation 
of the present dental profession the Bal- 
timore College of Dental Surgery, the first 
dental school in the world. 

Journal Of Dental Science 
Horace II. Havden and Chapin A. Har- 
ris, the admitted founders of the dental 
profession, contributed, in addition to the 
factor of dental education, other opportu- 
nities for professional growth and develop- 
ment. In 1839 the American Journal of 
Dental Science was founded, with Harris 
as its editor. Dr. Harris continued fully re- 







1 






***** — m 4?*?f zv£fy& 1 

VRB.8 ^fyJJJ^h,^. I 




Founders of First Dental School 



sponsible for dentistry's initial venture into 
periodic dental literature to the time of 
his death. In 1840 the American Society 
of Dental Surgeons was founded, with 
Havden as its President and Harris its Cor- 
responding Secretary. This was the begin- 
ning of national dental organization and 
was the forerunner of the American Dental 
Association, which numbers approximately 
forty-five thousand in its present member- 
ship. The foregoing suggests the unusual 
influence Baltimore dentists and the Bal- 
timore College of Dental Surgerv have ex 
ercised on professional ideals and policies. 



EXCERPTS FROM 

THE ANNOUNCEMENT (1840) OF 
THE BOARD OF VISITORS OF 
THE BALTIMORE COLLEGE OF 
DENTAL SURGERY 

"In announcing the incorporation of a 
college, organized with particular reference 
to instruction in Dental Science, the Board 
of Visitors deem it proper to state the con- 
siderations which have prompted its pro- 
jectors to engage in the enterprise, and also 
to make known the general plan of in- 
struction which it is proposed to pursue, 
and the requisites to be complied with 
by candidates for the honors of the Insti- 
tution. 



"A course of lectures will be delivered 
in each year, commencing on the first 
Monday in November and terminating on 
the last of February. 

"Candidates for graduation who have at- 
tended two full courses of lectures in this 
College, or one course in some respectable 
medical college, and one in this institu- 
tion, will be subjected to a critical exami- 
nation by the faculty, and be required to 
defend a thesis on some subject connected 
with dental science; they will also be re- 
quired to present one or more specimens 
of mechanical skill in preparing and set- 
ting artificial teeth, and likewise be ex- 
pected to perform certain dental opera 
tions in evidence of practical qualification; 
and on being found competent, thev shall 
receive the degree of DOCTOR OF 
DENTAL SURGERY. 

"The charge for attending each profes- 
sor, for each session, will be $30. Diploma 
fee, $30. Matriculation fee, $5. 

"In presenting this brief exposition, the 
Board of Visitors admit their earnest desire 
to have the claims of this Institution to 
particular patronage justly understood. In- 
terested as all are in the advancement of 
science, thev would have none insensible 
to the merit which projected this novel 
and highly commendable scheme for ele- 
vating the character of a most useful pro- 
fession and promoting the general good, 
and they therefore ask for the enterprise 
the liberal support of the medical pro- 
fession and the public.'' 



Glee Club 

On March 3 the Men and Women's 
Glee Club will present a musical program 
at the Maryland Casualty Club in Balti- 
more at 4 P. M. The Clubs have presented 
several musicals in Montgomery and Prince 
George's Counties and will take an extend- 
ed trip into the western part of the state 
in April. They will probably stop in Ha- 
gerstown, Frederick, Hancock, and Cum- 
berland. 



Maryland Alumni News 



Brun, '05, Heads Dental Centenary 




Dr. B. Lucien Brun. '05 
General Chairman 



Several thousand dentists and laymen 
from all parts of the country will come to 
Baltimore to attend the Dental Centenary 
Celebration to be held on March 18, 19, 
and 20. This celebration will be the most 
interesting and instructive meeting in the 
history of the dental profession. At this 
very significant meeting dentistry will pay 
tribute to the founders of Dental Educa- 
tion, Dental Literature, and Dental Or- 
ganization. 

During the mornings of the celebration 
there will be one academic and two gen- 
eral sessions at Ford's Theatre. These im- 
pressive exercises will coordinate the hom- 
age paid by other professions and groups 
to dentistry's contribution to humanity. 
Honorary Degrees 

On Wednesday morning. March 20, 
the Uniycrsity of Maryland will hold an 
academic convocation, impressive features 
of which will be the large and colorful 
academic procession and the conferring of 
honorary degrees. In this session universi- 
ties, colleges and other educational insti- 
tutions, as well as foreign, national and 
state dental bodies, will join in commemo- 
rating the founding of the Baltimore Col- 
lege of Dental Surgery, the first dental 



Celebration 

MARCH 18th, 19th, 20th 

Baltimore 

school in the world. Dr. Raymond A. Kent, 
President of the University of Louisville, 
will address the convocation on "The Re- 
lation of Dental Education to the Univer- 
sity Program." 

The program of Scientific Essays will be 
presented at the Fifth Regiment Armory 
during the three afternoons. This division 
will bring together fifty-four of the out 
standing intellects of contemporary den- 
tistry. The sessions will be presided over 
and addressed by men of international rep- 
utation, all chosen because of their known 
ability to speak authoritatively to the pro- 
fession upon the subjects assigned to them. 
Exhibits 

During the three days there will also be 
a continual presentation of moving pic 
tures provided by the leading schools and 
dentists of the country. 

The division devoted to the historic and 
scientific exhibits will demonstrate a cen- 
tury of advancement in the art and science 
of dentistry. Grouped around a replica of 
the first dental college, one-third size, ex- 
hibits of the dental colleges, dental organ 
izations, and public health institutions will 
show the evolution of dental materials, in- 
struments, techniques, research and liter- 
ature. The public will be admitted to this 
important centenary feature, which will be 
presented on the main floor of the Ar- 
mory. 

The Association of Dental Manufactur- 
ers will join in the celebration with a com- 
plete display of dental equipment showing 
interesting development of many kinds of 
dental supples, as well as the latest achieve- 
ments in dental manufacture. 
Cavalcade 

The principal attraction of the activi- 
ties arranged for the evenings will be an 
historical drama to be presented at Ford's 
Theatre. The drama will be a cavalcade 
I Continued on Page 6, Col. 3) 




Dr. J. Ben Robinson, '14 
Dean Dental School 



Excerpts From Speech 
Dean J. Ben Robinson 



By 



In the early part of the nineteenth cen- 
tury the preceptorial form of education 
existed to a large extent in medicine and 
exclusively in dentistry. Both professions 
placed greater emphasis upon what cur- 
rently appeared to be a successful art of 
practice than upon fundamental sciences. 
Horace Hayden was one of the first dentists 
to recognize this error and to urge sound 
training in the biological sciences as a 
base for the development of a rational art 
of dental practice. This concept was the 
prime factor that led to the founding of 
the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery. 

Ilavden's unusual scientific ability at- 
tracted to dentistry an esteem that made 
possible his achievements in the educa- 
tional field. He was self educated in the 
basic medical sciences and he had mastered 
the dental literature of the past and had 
acquired unusual proficiency in the art of 
dental practice. He was made an honorary 
member of the Medical and Chirurgical 
Faculty of Maryland in 1810 and was li- 
censed the same year by the Medical and 
Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland to prac- 



Februnry. 1940 



ticc dentistry, the first such license issued 
in America; he was invited in 1823 to de- 
liver a course of lectures on dental physi- 
ology and pathology to the students in the 
School of Medicine, University of Mary- 
land. These lectures continued for three 
consecutive years, terminating because of 
the well-known rupture in the Faculty of 
the School of Medicine in 1826. This 
teaching experience in the Medical School 
convinced Hayden that because of the pe- 
culiar nature of dentistry's therapeutic 
measures its educational needs could not 
be satisfied by its becoming a part of con- 
ventional medical teaching and that an in- 
dependent dental college would better 
serve dentistry's educational needs. In 1837 
the Jefferson Medical College in Philadel- 
phia conferred an honorary M. D. degree 
on Hayden, one of but two ever to be con- 
ferred on dentists by that institution; in 
1840 the Medical School, University of 
Maryland, conferred on him the same de 
grec — the only one conferred by it on a 
dentist. In 1840 Hayden achieved the 
founding of the Baltimore College of Den- 
tal Surgery and in the same year he headed 
a group that organized the American So- 
ciety of Dental Surgeons. He served as 
President of the Baltimore College from 
1840 until his death in 1844 and as Pres- 
ident of the American Society of Dental 
Surgeons for the same period. 

Hayden waas supported in his venture 
by Chapin A. Harris, one of dentistry's 
greatest contributors to dental education, 
organization and literature, Thomas E. 
Bond, Jr., one of Baltimore's most emi- 
nent physicians, and II. Willis Baxley, one 
of the most distinguished surgeons in 
America at the time. 

These founders of the Baltimore Col- 
lege of Dental Surgery were conscious of 
the aims and purposes of dentistry, were 
familiar with its exacting special require- 
ments, and were masters of the intricate 
processes involved in dental service. The 
plan of education adopted by them to meet 
the needs of competent dental practice not 
only established the College permanently 
but laid the foundation for the present 
broad system of dental education. It was 
this concept that made it possible for the 
Baltimore College of Dental Surgery to 
persist down to the present, and it was the 
practical idealism of the founders that 
caused this plan of education to be adopt- 



Kelsey Leads Dental 

Alumni In Centenary Celebration 

The President of the University of Maryland Dental 
Alumni Association will head several thousand graduates 
in the Centenary Celebration of the oldest Dental School 
in the world. 

Dr. Kelsey is a man of wide experience not only in the 
practice of orthodontics but also in the conduct of scientific 
societies. He is a former President of the Eastern Society 
of Graduates of the Angle School of Orthodontia; the 
Southern Society of Orthodontists; the American Society 
of Orthodontists; the Maryland State Dental Association 
and the Association of Dental Surgeons of Baltimore. 

After graduating from Baltimore College of Dental Sur- 
gery in 1896, Doctor Kelsey remained at his Alma Mater 
until 1925 as a teacher, being Professor of Orthodontia 
when he resigned. Dr. Kelsey has been honored by the 
Baltimore City Dental Society with a testimonial dinner 
in 1928. He is an honorary member of a number of sci- 
entific organizations and has contributed many articles 

dealing with theory and practice of orthodontia. j) R Harry E. Kelsey 

— Taken from The Dental Cosmos. 




ed by other sections of the country and 
transplanted to other parts of the world. 
Today 43 dental schools, members of the 
American Association of Dental Schools, 
conform literally to the program laid down 
by these great leaders of one hundred years 
ago; and there are approximately 7,000 
students in the dental schools of the Uni- 
ted States and 63,000 practicing dentists 
who point directly to Baltimore as the 
source of their inspiration and achieve- 
ment. 

On March 18, 19 and 20, 1940, the den- 
tal profession throughout the world will 
come to Baltimore to celebrate the one 
hundredth anniversary of the founding of 
dental education, dental journalism, and 
dental organization. Every dental school in 
the United States will join with the Balti- 
more College of Dental Surgery in cele- 
brating its one hundred years of effective 
and capable service to the profession and 
to society. 'Die University of Maryland is 
proud of the unique and honorable record 
of the Dental College, and the latter is 
signally fortunate to be included among 
the many colleges of distinction that form 

the University. 

e 

Working — Mildred Smith, '39, a mem- 
ber of Alpha Delta, is now working at 
Sears and Roebuck in Frederick. 



Centenary Celebration 
Of Dental School 

(Continued from Page 5) 
of American dentistry, with Horace Hay 
den as the central and coordinating char- 
acter. Beginning in 1780 with a scene laid 
in a field dressing-station near Yorktown, 
and ending in 1940 with a scene in a mod- 
ern dental office, the story of the rugged 
road American dentists have travelled will 
be told in twenty-five colorful and dramatic- 
episodes. The blundering ignorance of the 
early itinerant practitioners; the leader- 
ship of the pioneers who accepted the dial 
lenge of skepticism and abuse; the worth 
and genius of the great characters who 
founded the elements of the dental triad 
of education, organization and literature — 
these features of dental progress form the 
highlights of the drama. 

Entertainment 
The plans for the entertainment of the 
centenary visitors should make their stay- 
in Baltimore one of the happiest memo- 
ries of their lives. These plans include golf 
and trapshooting matches, receptions, a 
tour of Baltimore, a drive to Annapolis, 
and a bridge luncheon for the women. A 
dinner dance will be held at the Lord Bal- 
timore Hotel on the Tuesday evening of 
the celebration. 



Maryland Alumni News 




The Dental Clinic Today 




9 
4 




^ 




-, 




'£ 



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Old Line Athletic Contributions 



By W. H. ("Bill") HOTTEU 



Led Teams Into Southern Conference Title Events 





GEARY EPPLEY 
Track Coach 



BURTON SHIPLEY 
Basket Ball Tutor 



HEINIE MILLER 
Boxing Mentor 



THREE MARYLAND TEAMS ARE OCCUPIED WITH TOURNAMENTS 



Maryland athletes were tournament- 
conscious when this was written, with the 
boxers and tracksters in competition at 
Columbia, S. C, and Chapel Hill, N. C, 
and the basketers tuning for action at 
Raleigh, N. C, beginning February 29. 

Coach Heinie Miller's scrappers were un- 
certain in defending the title won last 
year; the tracksters, minus Sprinter Joe 
Murphy, felt they would do well to retain 
the runner-up position gained in 1939, 
and the basketers did not appear formid- 
able enough to reach the final as was done 
last March. 

Boxing Team Formidable 

Led by Newton Cox, defender of the 
165-pound crown, Maryland sent a com- 
plete team of eight boxers to the Confer- 
ence championship. 

Cox had fought four times in the reg- 
ular season, winning twice, getting a draw, 
and losing a disputed decision to Fenton 
Somerville of Virginia. 



Three Grid Coaches 

Jack Faber, Al Heagy and Al 
Wood, three Maryland products 
and faculty members, and long as- 
sociated with athletics at College 
Park, jointly will handle the varsity 
football team. They now are con- 
ducting spring practice. This was 
decided just as the Alumni News 
went to press. 



His main supporters were Bob Bradley, 
127, unbeaten in four scraps; Nate Askin, 
135, who had a clean slate with four vic- 
tories and a forfeit, and Izzy Alperstein, 
145, brother of the noted Benny, who had 
won four times and lost a close decision. 

John Harn, 120; Norman Hathaway, 
155; Izzy Leites, 175, and George Pyles, 
heavy, were other Terp aspirants. Harn 
had gained one decision, and lost four; 
Hathaway had a win, a draw, and a de- 
feat; Leites had won 3 of 5 bouts, while 



Pyles registered a T. K. O. in his lone 
appearance of the season in Maryland's 
final match with Western Maryland. 

Bradley, Askin and Cox all are clever 
boxers with a punch, as is Alperstein, but 
he lacks the experience of the other three. 
Askin doubtless was the smoothest worker 
in the tourney. Harn is the hard-luck scrap- 
per of the team. Weighing only 112, he 
just was edged out in the four tilts he lost. 

Maryland had only a 50-50 team record 
for the season, defeating Duke, 5-3, and 
Western Maryland, 6V2 to \Yi; drawing 
with Virginia, 4-4, and losing to Catholic 
University, 3V2 to 4 1 / / 2, and to North Car- 
olina, IVi to SVi. 

Titles, Records At Stake 

Maryland sent 14 trackmen into 10 
events in the Conference meet. 

Four Maryland athletes and the relay 
team were defending titles and records. 
Alan Miller, winner of the 440 last year in 
(Continued on Page 9, Col. 2) 



8 



Maryland Alumni News 



Baseball Has Problem; 
Stick Squad Strong 

Baseball battery men are toiling and la 
■crosse players are wielding sticks as Man- 
kind teams in these sports look to tough 
schedules. Both had great seasons in 1939, 
the stickmcn gaining the national colle 
giate crown and the nine winning 1 5 of 
19 games. 

With Earl Springer and Pershing Mon- 
dorff left from last year and Leon Vannais 
and Max Hunt coming up from the Frosh, 
Burton Shipley should have fine pitching. 
His outfield with Hugh Keller, Fritz Mais 
el and Burton Culver as the leaders should 
be okay, too, but the infield is giving him 
the jitters. Stringer hurled 7 wins in 8 
starts and Mondorff won 6 of 7 last spring. 

Adam Bengoechea is the onlv infield 
regular left, with Eddie Johnson, Shortv 
Chumbris and George Kneplev, a great 
trio, having passed out of the picture. Bill 
England, who played the outfield, is slated 
to be in the inner works, but Bengoechea 
is the only certainty. Dick McHale appears 
as the ace of the infielders to come from 
the 1939 yearlings. 

Catcher appears ample with Bob Burns 
on hand again and aided by Merle DuVall, 
1939 frosh receiver, and John Bovda. 

Meade And Hewitt Lost 

Jim Meade. all-America defense, and 
Rip Hewitt, ace attacker, were regulars 
lost from the title lacrosse team by grad- 
uation and Gary Todd, regular second de 
fense, quit school. However, several good 
men will be gained from the 1939 frosh. 

Two yearlings who showed unusual ca- 
pabilities were Markland Kelly, who played 
in home, and Al Slesinger, second attack. 
Kelly, though, was an ace goalie as a schol- 
astic player, and likely will play that spot. 
Several others showed marked possibilities 
and at least six should prove assets to the 
varsity. 

Bill Bond, Jordan Sexton and Oscar Ne- 
vares, attack; Jim Heil, center; Milton Mu- 
litz, all- America, Leo Mueller and Jack 
Mueller, defense men, and Jack Grier, 
goalie, are regulars and near-regulars who 
again are available. 

It should take a lot of lacrosse to rob 
the Terps of their crown. 



CRACK HALF MILER 




JJM KEHOE 



Maryland Teams 

(Continued from Page 8) 
51 seconds; Jim Kehoe, victor in the 880 
in 1:56.8; Mason Chronister, mile champ 
in 4:16.1 and the mile relay quartet, 
which scored in 3:29.3, held 1939 meet 
crowns and marks. Tom Fields, 2 mile 
ruler, also was defending, but he did not 
approach the record in his 1939 triumph. 

Murphy, who won the 60-yard dash last 
year and also started the relay team to 
victorv by running the first quarter, has 
been unable to get in trim for indoor run 
ning. 

Maryland entries were: 
60-Yard Dash — Kenneth Barnes, El 
mer Rigby and Alan Miller. 

440- Yard Dash— Alan Miller and Allen 
Warfield. 

880-Yard Run— Jim Kehoe, Bob Con- 
don. Randall Cronin and Bob Montgom- 
ery. 

Mile- — Mason Chronister. 

2 Miles — Tommv Fields and Dick Sul- 
livan. 

Relay — Chronister, Kehoe. Warfield 
and Miller. 

70-Yard Low Hurdles — Wylie Hopkins. 

High Jump — Francis Morris and Wylie 
Hopkins. 

Broad Jump — Francis Morris. 

Shot Put — Charley Morris. 

Basketers Exceed Expectations 

Coach Burton Shipley's tossers did bet 
ter than was expected in the regular sea- 
son in winning 1 3 games and losing 8, as 
the squad did not look to be better than 



World Record Is Tied 
In Terp-5th Meet 

Frank Fuller of Virginia and Marsh Far- 
mer of Texas Tech tied the world 70-yard 
hurdle mark of 8.5 seconds and meet rec- 
ords galore were smashed in the Maryland- 
Fifth Regiment games in the latter's big 
Armorv in Baltimore the night of Febru- 
arv 10. Only a fair crowd saw the finest 
meet staged in this section in years, due 
greatly to a heavy downpour that started 
late in the afternoon and continued at 
night. 

Tom Deckard of Indiana was credited 
with the second best performance in win- 
ning the 2 miles from Joe McCluskey, an- 
other Olympian of 1936, in 9:05.9, which 
may be a world mark for a flat board track. 

Archie San Roman i of Kansas won the 
featured Governor's Mile in 4:16.1, with 
Mason Chronister of Maryland third, and 
Sanford Goldberg of New York took the 
Oriole 660 from Jim Kehoe of the Terps 
by inches. 

Georgetown won the collegiate point 
trophy with 22 points and captured the 
feature mile relav in 3.24, one of the new 
meet records, with Maryland in second 
place ahead of North Carolina. 

Maryland Is Runner-Up 

Maryland also was second to the Hoyas 
for the team trophy, with Tommy Fields 
winning the mile and Alan Miller finish- 
ing third in the 440, which he might eas- 
ily have won had he not been pocketed. 

Virginia carried off the A. A. U. section 
team trophy, with 9Vi points to Passon 
A. A.'s 8, and Mercersburg nosed out 
Washington-Lee High, 6 to 5, for honors 
in the scholastic division. 

Practically every event on the card was 
well contested and most every team in 
the meet got points. 

a 50-50 set-up when the campaign started. 

George DeWitt, tall forward and all- 
Southern Conference last year, was the 
mainstav of the Terps, with Merle Du- 
Vall as his running mate. Others who were 
regulars as the schedule closed were Bill 
Rea, center, and Pershing Mondorff and 
Milton Mulitz, guards. 

Others picked to make the tourney trip 
were Charley Weidinger, Gene Ochsen- 
reiter, Adam Bengoechea, Leon Vannais 
and Arthur Woodward. 



February. 1940 



Guy Motter, '05, LL B., 
Heads Frederick Group 

At the annual meeting of the Frederick 
County Alumni Group, Mr. Guv K. Mot 
ter, '05, LL.B., was elected President. Mr. 
Motter is a well-known and eminent cit- 
izen of Fredeick County and Frederick 
City. He was for some time an attorney-at- 
law and now is the Frederick Citv's post- 
master. Mr. Motter is a past president of 
the American Legion, was the first pres- 
ident of the Frederick City Rotarv Club, 
and now is secretary-treasurer of the Fred- 
erick Count}- Agriculture Society. He is a 
very enthusiastic and interested Alumnus 
and under his guidance main things can 
be looked for in Frederick County. 
Keller Present 
Other officers elected at the meeting 
were Mr. Ransom R. Lewis, '19, as Vice- 
President, who is also a member of the 
general Alumni Board. The Secretary- 
Treasurer is Miss Anne F. "Nancy" An- 
ders, '39, a member of Tri Delt. Members 
elected to the Executive Committee, in ad- 
dition to the above named officers, arc Dr. 
William E. Trail, '26, D.D.S., Dr. Charles 
F. Mullen, Mr. Ross Smith. '29, and Dr. 
B. O. Thomas, Jr. A very delightful meet- 
ing was held at the Catoctin Country Club 
at which Charley Keller was the guest of 
honor and was presented a silver plate by 
Mr. P. W. Chichester, *20, Vice-President 
of the general Alumni Association, on be- 
half of the Alumni for his contributions 
to the prestige of our Alma Mater. Others 
to speak at the meeting were Geary Ep 
pley, Director of Athletics at the Univer- 
sity, and G. F. Pollock, Secretary of the 
Alumni Association. Mr. Homer Rems- 
burg, '18, President of the Group, presid- 
ed. Following the talks a motion picture 
entitled •'Touching All Bases," showing 
the highlights of the 1939 baseball season 
and prominently featuring Charley Keller, 
was shown to the Group. Such interest in 
the picture resulted in having it shown 
the following morning at the Middlelown 
High School to the student body, where 
Charley Keller first began his school days. 
Those Present 
A buffet supper followed the evening 
program and good fellowship carried on 
for some time. Among those present for 
the meeting were Walter E. Sinn, Charles 
VV. Poole. '36, C. Grayson Stevens, '36, 



10 



OPERA STARS 

COMING TO CAMPUS 




EMMA OTERO 




FRANK LA FORGE 



Opera On The Campus; 
March 12, 1940 

Under the auspices of the Music De- 
partment the University will again present 
outstanding artists in the persons of Miss 
Emma Otero, soprano, and Frank La 
Forge, pianist. Miss Otero comes to the 
Maryland campus from a successful sea- 
son in eight European capitals and con- 
certs in New York. Miss Otero's triumphal 
climax of her European tour was in Paris, 
where she was wildly acclaimed as a new 
sensation. Success followed her to America, 
where she appeared as soloist on the Ford 
Sunday Evening Hour. 

She is a pupil of Mr. La Forge, as has 
been Lawrence Tibbett, Lily Pons, and 
many other outstanding singers. 

The price of admission will be from 
fifty cents to one dollar and fifty cents, all 
scats reserved. Write the Alumni office for 
vour reservation. Professor Harlan Randall, 
Director of Music, will be in charge of 
the program on arrangements. 



Heagy Does Great Job 
With Frosh Tossers 

Al Heagy, Maryland's freshman basket 
ball coach, turned in a great job in win- 
ning 8 of 14 games with the "least ex- 
perienced" squad of yearling basketers ever 
to play for the Terps. 

Some never had played before and sev- 
eral others had only a year in the sport 
and, in addition, the tossers lacked height 
and weight. 



C. C. C. — Lewis G. Phillips, '33, now is 
employed as a Civil Engineer with the 
C. C. C. camp at Beltsville, Maryland. In 



1938 Lewis received his Civil Engineering 
degree. His home is 1913 Randolph St., 
N. E., Washington, D. C. 



James Zimmerman, '37, Charles E. Keller, 
Jr., '38, G. W. Algire, '30, Clarence C. 
Carty. '23. Peter W. Chichester, '20, L. 
P. Downin, '23, H. J. Kefauver, '00, Alvin 
Klein, '37, Ralph Kline, '23, Charles Rems- 
burg, '26, Henry R. Shoemaker, '17, E. 
Eugene Thomas, Jr., '34, Philip Wert- 
heimer, '29, Melvin H. Derr. '31, Dr. Da 
vid H. Everhart, Dr. A. D. Flory, Dr. 



Noah E. Kefauver, Arthur Remsburg, Dr. 
Frank V. Swearingen, '24, Dr. George B. 
Crist, '14, Dr. Thomas C. Routson, '99, 
Amos A. Holter, '30, Charles Mc. Mathias, 
Mrs. Alexander Gow, Michael Lombardo, 
'37, Warren Evans, '36, Harold Rems- 
burg, '24, Robert Remsburg, '30, Edward 
Storm, Brig. Gen. D. John Markey, '03, 
and Dr. J. Elmer Harp, '23. 

Maryland Alumni News 



Women's Board To Hold 
Card Party, March 29 

The annual card party of the Women's 
Board of the University Hospital for the 
benefit of the patients in the free wards, 
will be held at the Alcazar in Baltimore 
on March 29. This is the one and only 
appeal made by this organization each year 
for financial aid to assist in carrying on 
their great work in the Hospital. Just 
recently this philanthropic group of ladies 
gave $5,000 to the Hospital for the aid 
of the needy in providing additional lab 
oratory facilities. Many words of praise 
could be written about their great work, 
but the greatest thing we can do for them 
row is to remember their appeal on March 
29, with our wholehearted support. 

Send your dollar to the Alumni Office 

for a ticket. 

O 

Engaged — Miss Elinor Courtnc, 
Broughton, '38, a member of Kappa Kappa 
Gamma, and Dr. Wolcott L. Ktiennc, '34, 
a member of Alpha Tan Omega, arc to be 
wed. Elinor, the daughter of Dr. L. B. 
Broughton, 'OS, now Dean of the College 
of Arts and Sciences, is a member of Mor- 
tar Board, a women's senior honor society. 
Dr. Etienne is a lieutenant in the Army 
Medical Corps and is stationed at the Field 
Service School, Carlisle Barracks. No date- 
has been set for the wedding. 



To Wed— Miss Jean Hartig and Mr. 
Norborne A. Hire, both of Port Deposit, 
Maryland, are to be married this spring. 
Jean is a member of Tri Delt, and Nor- 
borne is a member of Alpha Gamma Rho 
and is at present emploved in Roanoke, 
Virginia. 




Ideal place to entertain 
friends or relatives. 



Headquarters 
for Good Times ! 

For your convention, banquet or 
dance . . . whatever the occasion, 
you'll find that the Lord Balti- 
more's exceptional services and 
facilities will make it a long- 
remembered success. 700 com- 
fortable rooms, two restaurants, 
bars and luxurious Cocktail 
Lounge at your service. 

$3 TO $6 SINGLE 



lb 

=LORD BALTIMORE 





jl gnJJP 

BALTIMORE. MARYLAND 



Assistant Superintendent — Gardner G. 
Shugart. '31, has been appointed Assistant 
Superintendent of Schools of Prince 
George's County. Shugart, formerly Prin- 
cipal of the Marlboro High School, will 
now assist Mr. Nicholas Orem, Superin- 
tendent. 

Married — Ensign William N. Thies, 
'38, and Miss Eleanor Scott of Silver 
Spring, Maryland, are now Mr. and Mrs. 
"Bill," a former track star now turns his 
attention to riving and is an officer in the 
U. S. Naval Flving Corps. 



Birth — Mr. and Mrs. C. R. Brown have 
a daughter, Barbara Ellen, born September 
26, 1939. Mrs. Brown was formerly Aline 
Herzog, '29. The Browns arc residing in 
Schenectady, N. Y., where Mr. Brown is 
employed by the General Electric Com- 
pany. He is a graduate of Johns Hopkins. 



Married — Mr. George J. O'Hara, '31, 
and Miss Mary Teresa McOuillen of 
Washington were married November 22, 
1939. at St. Peter's Church in Washington. 



CUT ON THIS LINE 



ANOTHER DRIVE IS CN 

Will You Join Your Fellow Alumni? 



Fellow Alumni: 

wish to be a contributing member of 
nc University of Maryland Alumni As- 
Jciation, and am enclosing the usual 
mount of $2.00 for the year 1939-1940, 
f this fifty cents is for one year's sub- 
:ription to the Alumni News. 



r PLEASE FILL OUT AND RETURN THIS BLANK NOW ! ! 



Name Class 



Address 



Occupation 



Married? To whom 



Children 



Business address „ Title. 





Chesterfield 

Lhe real reason why Chesterfields 
are in more pockets every day is because Chest- 
erfield's Right Combination of the world's best 
cigarette tobaccos gives you a better smoke... 
definitely milder, cooler and better-tasting. You 
can't buy a better cigarette. 

MAKE YOUR NEXT PACK CHESTERFIELD 




Cnnvriphr 10 (n T \r.c 



&■ Mvi:dc TV 




ALUMNI 
NEWS 



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o 



)s4ARCH 
1940 



o 




GREAT ATHLETES WILL BE SEEN IN ACTION 

AT MARYLAND'S FIELD DAY ON MAY 4 




JIM KEIIOE 

Elongated Terp from Bel Air, 
Md., who is one of the country's 
greatest half-milers. He ran consist- 
cnflv among the leaders in the big 
northern meets, winning one race in 
which he defeated the best in com- 
petition, lie also is the Southern 
Conference champion, setting a new 
mark of 1:55.8 in the February 
games at Chape] Hill, N. C, though 
not pressed. 

Kehoe's brother. Sterling, will run 
for Bel Air in the meet. 



While Maryland's twenty-third 
annual Spring affair is mainly tor 
schoolboys in a meet that offers 13 
open intcrschohstic events and nine 
closed to county high schools of the 
State, there always are other attrac- 
tions and one of them this year— 
the dual track clash between Vir- 
ginia and Maryland— will present 
some of the Nation's best perform- 
ers. 

Here is the day's card: 

/ P.M. — Start of track 
events in which the 
scholastic and dual 
meets will he run con- 
currently. 

1 P.M. — Varsity tennis. 
George Washington vs 
Maryland. 

2:30 P.M. — Varsity 
baseball, William and 
Mary vs Maryland. 

In addition to the regulation 
open intcrschohstic events, two 
added features are a mile relay race 
for the Maryland Intcrschohstic 
Association teams and one of a like 
distance for the Washington High 
schools. 

County school events are the 100, 
220 and -HO-yard dashes, the half- 
mile run, the 12-pound shot put, the 
broad jump, high jump and two 
sections of a half-mile relay. Divi- 
sion I is for schools with an en- 
rollment of under 100 hovs and Sec- 
tion II is for schools having in 
excess of that number. 




FRANK FULLER 



Virginia's 



great 



hurdler who 
stepped the 70-yard highs in the 
non-conference event in the South- 
ern Conference indoor meet in 
February in the world record-break- 
ing time of 8A seconds. 




JOE MURPHY 

Maryland's ace sprinter who holds 
both the Southern Conference out- 
door marks for the 100 and 220-vard 
dashes of 9.8 and 21A seconds, re- 
spectively. 











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Volume XI 



MARYLAND ALUMNI NEWS, MARCH, 1940 



Number 10 



Alumni Association — University of Maryland 

Founded in 1892 






OFFICERS FOR 1939 - 40 

Charles W. Sylvester, '08, President 
Baltimore, Md. 

P. W. Chichester, '20, First Vice-President Frederick, Md. 

H. W. Burnside, '04, Second Vice-President Washington, D. C. 
G. F. Pollock, '23, Secretary-Treasurer College Park, Md. 

ALUMNI BOARD 
(Note — The officers named above are also members of the Alumni Board) 

J. Donald Kieffer, '30 Arts and Sciences 

Charles V. Koons, '29 Engineering 

R. R. Lewis, '19 Education 

John A. Silkman, '35 Agriculture 

Ruth Miles, '31 Home Economics 

Norwood Sothoron, '34 Commerce 

MEMBERS AT LARGE 

E. E. Powell, '13; Philip Wertheimer, '29 Men's Representatives 

Mary York Gadd, '28; Gertrude Chesnut, '27 Women's Representatives 

C. Walter Cole, '21 Immediate Past President 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Editor 

Maryland Alumni News, issued monthly by the University of Maryland Alumni Associa- 
tion at College Park, Md., as second-class matter under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Annual Alumni Association dues are $2.00. One year's subscription to Alumni News. 
50 cents. 

GROUP LEADERS 

ALLEGANY COUNTY: E. Brooke Whitting, '98, President; Dr. Joserjh Franklin. '21. Secretary. 

Cumberland. Md. 
BALTIMORE COUNTY: C. Walter Cole, '21, President; H. B. Derrick, '17, Secretary, Towson. 

Maryland. 
BALTIMORE CITY: Chester Tawney, '31. President, 4022 Roland Avenue; E. Gordon Ham- 
mond. '34. Secretary. 1023 W. Barre Street. Baltimore. Md. 
CAROLINE COUNTY: George W. Clendaniel. '20. President; Dr. Maurice A. Brackett, '21. 

Treasurer; Mrs. George W. Clendaniel. '21. Secretary, a41 of Denton, Md. 
HARFORD COUNTY: W. B. Munnikhuysen. '14, President; H. M. Carroll. '20, Secretary. 

Bel Air. Md. 
FREDERICK COUNTY: Guy K. Motter, '05, LL.B., President; Miss Ann "Nancy" Anders, 

'39. Secre ary. Frederick, Md. 
MONTGOMERY COUNTY: Lawrence G. Smoot, '18, President, Kensington, Md.; Mary Fisher. 

'36. Secretary. Rockville. Md 
NEW YORK CITY: Mr. James E. Dingman. '21, President, 32 Sixth Avenue; Sarah Morris, '25, 

Secretary. 310 East 44th Street, New York City. 
PHILADELPHIA: A. Moulton McNutt. '06. President. 413 Cooper Street, Camden, N. J.; J. P. 

Mudd. '07. Secretary. 174 Manheim Street. Philadelphia, Pa. 
PITTSBURGH: E. Minor Wenner. '27. President. 1111 Gladys Avenue; Dr. A. A. Krieger, '32. 

Secretary Highland Building. Pittsburgh. Pa. 
WASHINGTON, D. C: J. Douglas Wallop, '19. President. 6139 N. Dakota Avenue, N.W.; 

Charles V. Koons. '29. Secretary. 419 Fourth Street. N.E., Washington. 
WASHINGTON COUNTY: Hon. Henry Holzapfel, Jr., '93, President, Hagerstown. Md.; L. G. 

Mathias, '23, Secretary, Hagerstown, Md. 

"M" CLUB OFFICERS AND BOARD MEMBERS 



A. K. Besley, '23 . . President 

James W. Stevens, '19 Vice-President 



Dr. E. N. Cory, '09 Secretary-Treas. 

G. F. Pollock, '23 Historian 



REPRESENTATIVES 



Mike Stevens, '37 Baseball 

W. C. Supplee, '26 Basketball 

Stewart McCaw, '35 Boxing 

E. E. Powell, '14 Lacrosse 

Roger Whiteford, '28 . . Track 



James Shumate, '20 Tennis 

John Gadd, '27 Cross Country 

Lewis W. Thomas, '28 Football 

Dr. E. B. Friedenwald, '03 1 . T 

Dr. A. W. Valentine, '04 f At Lar S e 



Cover Picture 

With spring just around the corner, 
students begin to congregate on the front 
steps. Here you see students between class 
on the steps of the former Arts and Sci- 
ences building. The reason for saying for- 
mer Arts and Sciences building is that the 
Colleges of Engineering and Arts and Sci- 
ences have switched buildings. The many 
new buildings and changes is all the more 
reason why every alumnus should return 
for the 48th Alumni Reunion to be held 
Friday, May 31, at College Park. 
• 

My Alumni Friends: 

The Alumni Association, Faculty and 
student body of the College of Dentistry 
of the University of Maryland can well be 
proud of the Den- 
tal Centenary Cele- 
bration in Baltimore 
which attracted 
world - wide atten- 
tion. They were not 
only the host, they 
were the wheel- 
horses and the pow- 
er behind the 
scenes. It was a 
magnificent con- 
vention in every re- 
spect and one of 
the very finest ever held. Congratulations 
to our Dental friends. 

This has been a month of great activity 
at Maryland. The concert, featuring Emma 
Otero and Frank LaForge, coloratura so- 
prano and pianist, on March 12, was an 
attractive affair. 

Our basket ball and boxing teams did 
very well in the Southern Conference 
meets, although they did not come out on 
top. There was stiff competition but they 
gave the very best they had every minute 
of the time. Well done, boys, and hearty 
congratulations. 

Lacrosse, baseball, track and tennis 
events are now on the athletic schedule. 
Our teams look good and you may expect 
to hear good accounts of our boys. Give 
them your support, win or lose. Enthusi- 
astic encouragement helps a lot. 

And again let me urge you to come to 
our support financially. Why not a contri- 
bution to "Rosey" Pollock, Secretary, to- 
day? With adequate funds, our Associa- 
tion can aid the University in many ways. 
Look forward to May 31, our Annual 
Alumni Meeting! 

Cordially yours, 
Chas. W. Sylvester, President. 




Dental Centennial Attracts 

Over Six Thousand Dentists 



More than six thousand dentists from 
all over the world assembled in Baltimore 
for the Centennial Celebration of the Old- 
est Dental School in the world. It was the 
Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, now 
the Dental School of the University, which 
had its beginning February 1, 1840. 
Brun General Chairman 

The celebration was headed by the 
American Dental Association with Dr. B. 
Lucien Brun, '05, as general chairman. A 
general Alumni Reunion of Maryland Den- 
tal graduates was held on February 17 
prior to the opening day, which was over- 
whelmingly attended. 

Foreign Awards 

At the Fifth Regiment Armory more 
than 500 educational exhibits were on dis- 
play and clinics of every description were 
conducted during the three-day session. 
Two foreign awards were made at the 
concluding convocation. 

On behalf of the University of Santo 
Domingo, Dr. F. M. Dimas-Aruti, D.D.S., 
'22, presented a plaque to the Baltimore 
College of Dental Surgery of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland in celebration of the 
Centennial Celebration. Another plaque 
was presented by Dr. Jose R. Quirogh, 
chief of the Bolivian Army Dental Corps, 
on behalf of the Bolivian Covernment. 
Governor O'Conor received the plaques 
on behalf of the University of Maryland 
and said that the State feels highly hon- 
ored to have within its borders an insti- 
tution of such historical distinction, and 
appreciates the thought behind the presen- 
tation of the plaques. 

Honorary Degrees 

The honorary degrees were conferred on 
four leaders of dental research and edu- 
cation by Dr. H. C. Byrd, President of 
the University of Maryland. The recipi- 
ents were: 

Dr. Raymond A. Kent, President of the 
University of Louisville. 



Dr. William J. Gies, of Columbia Uni- 
versity. 

Dr. Harvey P. Burkhart, Director of the 
Eastman Dental Clinic, Rochester. 

Dr. Arthur H. Merritt, President of the 
American Dental Association. 

For the last twelve years Dr. Burkhart 
has been in charge of the establishment of 
five $1,000,000 Eastman dental clinics in 
European capitals. 

Dr. Burkhart received the honorary de- 
gree of Doctor of Science — just fifty years 
ago to the day and almost to the hour fol- 
lowing his graduation from the Dental 
School in 1890. 

Dr. J. Ben Robinson, '14, Dean of the 
Dental School, and many of his staff mem- 
bers and fellow alumni took an active part 
in the general arrangements for the cele- 
bration. Various fraternal organizations and 
alumni from other universities held re- 
union in Baltimore. 

Governor Extends Welcome 
His Excellency, Herbert R. O'Conor, 
'20, Governor of Maryland, gave the open- 
ing address of welcome. Other speakers on 
the program were Mayor Howard W. Jack- 
son of Baltimore, Dr. William M. Lewis, 
President of Lafayette College, Dr. Thom- 
as Parran, Jr., Surgeon General of the 
United States Public Health Service, and 
Dr. Raymond A. Kent, President of the 
University of Louisville. 

Kelsey Leads Alumni 
Dr. Harry E. Kelsey, '98, President of 
the Dental Alumni Association, was a 
grand host of a great celebration which 
comes once in a century. 

A drama was presented depicting the 
early history of the dental profession, its 
obstacles, and how they were mastered by 
those pioneers of determination, Horace 
Hayden and Chapin Harris, founders of 
the first dental school one hundred years 
ago. 



Teacher — Miss Florence Fowble, '39, 
a member of Alpha Delta, is teaching 
mathemathics and biology at Sparks High 
School, Sparks, Maryland. 



Law — A member of the University Law 
faculty. Professor John S. Strahorn, Jr., 
wrote one of the lead articles in the Wash- 
ington and Lee University Law Review. 



University Receives 
Portrait of Dean DuMez 

At the annual meeting of the American 
Pharmaceutical Association held in Balti- 
more last month, alumni, faculty, and 
friends presented a portrait in oil of Dr. 
Andrew DuMez, Dean of the School of 
Pharmacy, to the University. 

Dr. Frank Black, '04, former President 
of the Pharmacy Alumni Association and 
general chairman of the University Char- 
ter Day Celebration in 1939, made the 
presentation on behalf of his colleagues. 
Dr. Byrd received the portrait on behalf 
of the University. 

The following eulogy of Dr. DuMez 
was given at the presentation by Dr. Black: 

Dr. Andrew Grover DuMez, a native of 
the State of Wisconsin, received his aca- 
demic and professional education in the 
University of that State. After spending a 
number of years in graduate work and 
teaching, he went to the Philippine Islands 
on appointment by the Federal Govern- 
ment to organize the School of Pharmacy 
of the University of the Philippines. After 
completing this task, he entered the Uni- 
ted States Public Health Service in 1917, 
where he served for nine years as Associ- 
ate Pharmacologist. In 1918 he was ap- 
pointed by the Secretary of the Treasury 
to serve as secretary of a committee to in- 
vestigate the traffic in narcotics in the 
United States and, in 1925, he was ap- 
pointed by the Secretary of State to rep- 
resent the United States Army and Navy 
in public health service at the Second In- 
ternational Conference on Unification of 
Standards for Potent Remedies held in 
Brussels. The pharmacists of Maryland are 
very fortunate in that Dr. DuMez was ap- 
pointed Dean of the School of Pharmacy 
of the University of Maryland on Febru- 
ary 1st, 1926. Since he has been Dean, 
the following outstanding achievements 
have taken place. 

He served as President of the American 
Association of Colleges of Pharmacy and 
has served as Secretary of the American 
Council on Pharmaceutical Education. He 
has taken an active part in the affairs of 
the American Pharmaceutical Association, 
which he has served in many capacities. 
He has been a member of its Council for 
more than twenty years, Editor of the 
(Continued on Page 10) 



General Alumni Reunion — May 31 



Maryland Alumni News 



"M" Club Spring 
Get-Together, May I 

In an endeavor to keep good fellowship 
alive, which is one of the great values of 
collegiate athletics. President A. Kirkland 
Besley, '23, of the "M" Club and his com- 
mittee, are arranging a spring get-together 
of all former Old Line athletes. 

On Wednesday, May 1, at the Beaver 
Dam Country Club in Prince George's 
County, at 7:00 P. M., the spring rally 
will be held. A bountiful buffet supper 
will be served and the tax is light — $1.00 
per person. A minimum of short speeches, 
but lots of entertainment and plenty of 
time for confabs with old cronies, will be 
the order of the program. 

Entertainment will include movies of 
the campus showing former and present- 
day athletes in competition with illustra- 
tions of various athletic contests, singing, 
etc. Bob Bradley, a star boxer of the Old 
Line squad, is also a "star" at the piano. 
The program will be informal and the rally 
is a fellowship get-together project. Call 
an old pal and bring him with you and if 
you know of a promising high school grad- 
uate, bring him as your guest! 

More information will come by letter, 
but make the date at once. 

• 

Citizens Honor 

J. Andy Cohill, '09 

At the annual dinner last month of 
the Hancock Chapter of the U. S. Junior 
Chamber of Commerce, James Andy Co- 
hill, '09, was honored by being presented 
the Citizen's Award in recognition of his 
outstanding contribution in civic service. 
The dinner also marked the anniversary 
of Founder's Day. 

Dr. Homer E. Tabler, former Chairman 
of the Maryland State Roads Commission, 
made the presentation and eulogized Mr. 
Cohill for his outstanding contributions 
to civic endeavors by coordinating the dif- 
ferent clubs of Hancock into a public re- 
lation council. On several occasions, the 
University Glee Club has made appear- 
ances in Hancock, under the auspices of 
the civic groups. 

Mr. Douglas M. Bivens, principal of 
Hancock, Maryland, High School, was 
toastmaster. 



Sigma Delta, Now 

K. K. G. Have Birthday 

On February 21, Kappa Kappa Gamma 
actives and Alumnae held a banquet in 
celebration of the twentieth birthday of 
Sigma Delta Sorority, the forerunner of 
Kappa at College Park. Two of the char- 
ter members and the first president were on 
hand for the occasion. Mrs. Elizabeth 
Hook Day, '21, first president, Ruth May- 
ors Melroy, and Mrs. Ruth Reppert 
Marsh, '23, were present. Other alumnae 
present were: Sarah Morris, Frances Wolfe, 
'25; Minnie Hill, Dorothy Young, Mrs. 
Louise Richardson Bowen, Mrs. Mary 
Riley Langford, '26; Mrs. Catharine Ap- 
pleman Longridge, Mrs. Katharine Daw- 
son Hill, '29; Mrs. Louise Marlowe Myers, 
Mrs. Louise Tovvnsend Savage, Mrs. 
Alice Orton Bruen, '30; Mrs. Esther 
Hughes Lee, Mrs. Helen Farrington 
Lamer, '33; Margaret Mayo, Mrs. Kitty 
Dennis Thomason, Mrs. Rosalie Grant 
Gaillard, '34; Mildred Chapin, '36; Jerry 
Schuh, Mrs. Janet Cartee Lohr, '37; Jean 
Dulin, Mrs. May Beggs Doeller, Kay Da- 
vis, '38; Nora Huber, Bernice Aring, Mar- 
garet MacDonald, Betty Barker, Laura 
Spehnkouch and Helen Reindollar, '39. 
Twenty-two active members were also 
present. 

Miss Marie Mount, Dean of the Col- 
lege of Home Economics, and Mrs. Lula 
Hottel were guests of the sorority. 
• 

Alumni Attention 
Income Tax Notice 

How many Alumni realize there is tax 
economy in gift contribution to the Alum 
ni Fund? Under the Revenue Act of 
1938 the taxpayer may still deduct the 
amount of a gift to an educational in- 
stitution from his taxable income in an 
amount up to 15% of the net income. 
In the case of husband and wife, each 
may claim the deduction for separate gifts 
made by them up to 15% of their individ- 
ual net incomes. The gift is also speci- 
fically free from gift tax. 

Your Association is endeavoring to es- 
tablish a suitable Alumni Fund for the fu- 
ture development of a greater University 
of Maryland. Write your Alumni secretary 
for more specific information. 



Annual Alumni Reunion, 
Friday, May 31 

We are rapidly nearing the half century 
milestone in the life of our Alumni Associ- 
ation. On Friday, May 31, the forty- 
eighth annual reunion will be held at 
College Park. 

Charles W. Sylvester, '08, President of 
the Alumni Association will lead the re- 
turning grads for a gala day of renewing 
friendship and fellowship. 

The general program will call for the 
gathering and registration of Alumni dur- 
ing the afternoon. Sightseeing about the 
campus and visiting among the faculty 
members will take place prior to the gen- 
eral or class lunch. At twelve noon the 
fifty year class flag raising will take place 
opening the general reunion of all five year 
classes, with their Presidents as follows: 
1895, Dr. W. W. Skinner, 1900, W. D. 
Groff, 1905, A. A. Parker, 1910, Congress- 
man W. P. Cole, 1915, P. N. Peter, 1920, 
George B. Hockman, 1925, G. Page Gard- 
ner, 1930, Albert B. Heagy, 1935, Tracy 
Coleman. 

In the afternoon it is planned to have 
special lectures for alumni in the various 
Colleges with the idea of getting the 
alumni better organized by Colleges. Also 
a special entertainment program will be 
presented in the afternoon. 

In the evening the Annual Alumni 
Reunion banquet will be held in the New 
Dining Hall with a curtailed speaking 
program, but with plenty of special enter- 
tainment. After the banquet all returning 
grads are invited to be guests of the Uni- 
versity at the 78th Commencement Ball. 
• 

Marine Corps Promotes 
Former Terp Grid Stars 

Several former athletic stars of the 
Terrapin squads moved upon the ladder 
to the rank of major in the United States 
Marine Corps by recent orders. Captains 
Thomas J. (Jack) McQuade, '24, Edward 
L. Pugh, '25, John (Pat) Lanigan, '26, 
and John Hough, '26, all members of 
one of Maryland's outstanding gridiron 
teams in history, entered the Marine Corps 
immediately following graduation. They 
have seen much of the world thru their 
foreign service assignments. McQuade and 
Pugh are in the Marine Flying Corps. 



March, 1940 



General Alumni Reunion — May 31 




HAINES AND MITCHELL ON THE TRACK 

Horses Win Championships 

For Haines And Mitchell 



Classmates of 1896, Mahlon N. Haines 
and Parker Mitchell, attended the Pine- 
hurst Meet, North Carolina, where their 
fast trotters and pacers won outstanding 
races. Both of them had champion honor 
horses for 1939. Haines of York, Penn- 
sylvania, owned Pascha Volo, who won 
more races as a two-year-old trotter than 
any horse in the history of America. This 
colt won thirteen races out of eighteen 
starts and never was out of the money. 

In 1939, Haines' stables won 50 races 
which is more than any other individually 
owned stable in America. 

Haines' Stable 

This stable had 16 trotters and pacers 
in Pinehurst and 11 in York. In 1940 
they are looking forward to having 
another outstanding champion. 



Parker Mitchell of Perryman, Maryland, 
owns Cleo Hanover, who one afternoon 
trotted a mile in l:59Vi and in 38 
minutes came back and paced the same 
distance in 2:07. No other horse in Amer- 
ica had ever done this on the same after- 
noon, according to all reports. 

Outstanding Alumni 

Parker Mitchell was the star football 
flying wedge center in the early nineties. 
Mahlon N. Haines was a star shortstop 
on the baseball team and winner of the 
competitive cadet drill in 1894. These 
men and their families have been friends 
ever since college days and both of them 
are greatly interested in the trotting horse 
game. 

They are outstanding alumni and strong 
boosters for the University of Maryland. 



Glee Club — A spring trip to the Eastern 
Shore plus an appearance at the New 
York World's Fair is the program for the 
University Glee Club. The Eastern Shore 
appearance will be at Cambridge on April 
11 and Denton on April 12. 

Decoration Day will find them at the 
World's Fair. They are one of the two 
Glee Clubs in the country which appeared 
with Fred Waring and nominated by him 
as worthy of an invitation to appear at 
the Fair. 

• 

New York — Word has been received 
that William F. Korff, '27, now is located 
in Schenectady, New York, where he is 
vice president of the Carl Company De- 
partment Store. He married Miss May 
Belle Carl and thev have one child. 



Business School — Miss Marian Mayes, 
'39, of Baltimore, Maryland, is attending 
Strayer's Business College. Marian, a mem- 
ber of Alpha Delta, was a finalist in the 
"Miss Maryland" beauty contest last year. 

a 
Married — Stewart B. Shaw, '04, and 
Miss Mossie G. Bayless were married last 
month. Stewart is the marketing specialist 
of the University Fxtension Service. The 
newlyweds reside in College Park. 

• 
Married — Warner Taliaferro Smith, 
'39, and Miss Eula Grace Lewis of College 
Park were married February 24 last. The 
ceremonies were held in the St. Andrew's 
Church in College Park. The newlyweds 
will live in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania. 



Civil Engineers, '34, 
Held Reunion In January 

On January 13 last the Civil Engineers 
of 1934 held a reunion at the home of 
Bill Ross in Washington, bringing with 
them their wives or friends. One of the 
particular features of the meeting was the 
compiling of a bibliography of each mem- 
ber. This meeting was in commemoration 
of their first five years out. The following 
list is a result of the meeting. Those 
present were as follows: 

Many Present 

Joseph A. Bogan, with the Carnegie- 
Illinois Steel Corporation in Homestead, 
Pa. J. Paul Bowker, with the Public Roads 
Administration in Washington, D. C, and 
married Miss Lois Huffman. John T. Dres- 
sel is with the Public Roads Administra- 
tion in Mt. Rainier, Maryland, not mar- 
ried. John C. Dye, with the Carnegie- 
Illinois Steel Corporation in Pittsburgh, 
Pa., married Miss Mora Lillian Plager. 
Stanley C. Lore is sales engineer for the 
Carnegie-Illinois Steel Corporation in 
Philadelphia, Pa., married Miss Helen 
Krafthofer. George O. Ralston is Junior 
Patent Examiner with the Patent Office, 
Washington, D. C, and married Miss 
Ruth Jones. William H. Ross is with 
Bohen and Wright, Contractors, in Wash- 
ington, D. C, and married Miss Eugenia 
Lawson. Howard C. Turner is construc- 
tion quartermaster with the War Depart- 
ment at Fort Belvoir, Virginia, and resides 
at University Park, Maryland. He married 
Miss Carolyn C. Carter. They have two 
children, Howard, Jr., and Carol Lynn. 
Harmon C. Welsh is aeronautical en- 
gineer at the Navy Yard, Washington, D. 
G, and lives in Hyattsville, Maryland. 
Thomas W. Wilson is attorney-at-law 
with H. L. Lohnes, Washington, D. C. 
lie resides in Arlington, Virginia, and 
married Miss Anne Webber. 

Those Not Present 

Those not present but who sent in- 
formation were: Fred II. Cutting, who is 
with the Aluminum Company of America 
in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and who is 
married to Winifred Kerstetter. They have 
one child, Linda. Theodore C. Edwards is 
with the J. Frank Keyll Lumber Company 
in Washington, D. C. He married Mar- 
guerite Hall and they have a daughter, 
(Continued on Page 7) 



General Alumni Reunion — May 31 



Maryland Alumni News 



four Graduates Set Up 

Novel Scholarship Plan 

With two purposes in mind, four grad- 
uates have agreed upon a novel way to set 
up a scholarship fund. It will be twenty- 
five years hence but some young man has 
something to look forward to. 

The four philanthropic minded young 
graduates are Leon Yourtee, '39, of Ha- 
gerstown, Jerry Hardy, '39, of College Park, 
Larry Hoover, '38, of Takoma Park, and 
Arthur Greenfield, '39, of New York. 
Their purpose is to see some one or more 
deserving young men secure a university 
education without having to endure the 
same impediments "as we have met". 
Divide Earnings 

The plan is to pool five percent of their 
annual taxable income. This will be divided 
five ways. Each member of the pact will 
receive one-fith and one-fifth will go to 
the scholarship fund for the next twenty- 
five years. Jerry Hardy will be trustee. 

At present three are employed and one 
is taking graduate work in dramatics. Ar- 
thur Greenfield is at the University of 
Southern California for graduate study. 
The others, however, have no worry about 
Arthur. They expect him to "crash" the 
movies any day. Larry Hoover, former 
editor-in-chief of the Diamondbacfc, is 
employed as a sports writer in Washington, 
D. C. Leon Yourtee, a campus dramatic 
star, is a civilian engineer in the United 
States Army in Panama, and Jerry Hardy, 
former editor of the Old Line, is with 
the Nation's Highway Safety Commission 
in Washington. 

The young men are to be congratulated 
for a novel idea that has merit! 



Engineering Alumni 
Plan Spring Reunion 

As the result of several get-togethers of 
Engineering Alumni during the past win- 
ter, plans for a spring reunion have been 
made. On April 20 all engineering gradu- 
ates will convene at the University Dining 
Hall at 7 P.M. for the first reunion of 
engineers. 

An interesting program is being arranged 
with a minimum of speeches and plenty 
of time for a good bull session! 

Those on the committee who gave birth 
to this idea are: Joe Deckman, '31, John 
Bell, '32, Sam McGlathery, '33, Bell Ross, 
'34, Henry Chick, '35, John Firmin, '36, 
Joe Harris, '36, Phil Firmin, '37, Joe Ben- 
nett, '38, and Tom Wharton, '39. 

Write any one of the committeemen 
for your reservation or contact the Alumni 
Office! Don't put it off as a crowd is 
expected! 

Senator Tydings, Congressman Cole, 
and Dr. Byrd are some of the engineering 
grads expected to be present. 



A. O. Pi Alumnae 
Held Spring Meeting 

On March 12, last, the monthly meet- 
ing of A. O. Pi Alumnae in the vicinity 
of Washington was held at the apartment 
of Mrs. William Henderson, financial 
advisor. The program included much about 
A. O. Pi in the Mid-Western and Pacific 
groups, also a talk on flowers by Mrs. 
Amelia Gude Thomas of Gude Brothers, 
florists. Mrs. Thomas is the wife of Bran- 
son Thomas, K. A. of 1921. 



English — Last June, Pyke Johnson, '37, 
received his Master of Arts Degree in 
English Literature from George Wash- 
ington University. Pyke is engaged in 
safety education for the National Educa- 
tion Association. 

• 

Toastmaster — When the chief editor, 
Mr. Edwin C. Powell of the United States 
Department of Agriculture retired, he was 
tendered a luncheon by his associates at 
which T. Swann Harding, '10, science 
editor and director of publications, 
U.S.D.A. was toastmaster. 



Engaged — Miss Margaret Collison, '40, 
of Takoma Park, Maryland, is engaged to 
Lt. John W. Stevens, 2nd, '39, of the U. 
S. Marine Corps. John has been assigned 
to duty in China and will leave in May. 
Margaret is to sail for China next spring 
and the wedding will take place in China. 
e 

Married — Miss Jacqueline Embrey, '41, 
of Tri Delta, former Maryland star tap 
dancer, married H. William Filbry, '42, of 
Delta Sigma Phi. Both were starred in the 
Varsity Show on the University campus 
last vear. 



Cecil County Group 
Plan Alumni Meeting 

On Friday, April 5, at 8 P.M. in the 
chapel of the Tome Town School, the 
Alumni Group of Cecil County will hold 
a meeting. G. F. Pollock, Alumni Secre- 
tary, will be present to talk on the Uni- 
versity activities and plans for 1940-41. 
Also to show motion pictures of the 
campus development as well as student ac- 
tivities and athletic contests. 

The committee urges every alumnus in 
the county to be present for the purpose of 
becoming better acquainted with your fel- 
low alumni and to work together for a 
greater University of Maryland. 
• 

Civil Engineers, '34, Reunion 

(Continued from Page 6) 
Shirley. Harold B. Houston is with the 
U. S. Engineering Office in Portland, Ore- 
gon, and has two children, Barbara and 
Nancy. Harry T. Kelly is a contractor at 
Houston, Texas, and lives in Galveston, 
Texas. He married Miss Grace B. Durrett. 
Everett S. Lank is assistant supervisor of 
maintenance for the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road Company in Johnstown, Pennsylvania. 
He married Miss Myra Lewis and has a 
daughter, Anne Chandler. Luis C. Martelo 
is with the Standard Oil Company of 
South America and is located at Carta- 
gena, Colombia, South America. He mar- 
ried Miss Martha Kirtley. George M. 
Miller is with the U. S. Army Engineers 
in charge of rivers and harbors. He resides 
at Randallstown, Maryland, married Miss 
Helen Taggart and has one daughter. 
Frances. William F. Neale is assistant 
master carpenter for the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road Company at Harrisburg, Pennsyl- 
vania. He married Miss Laurene Patty and 
has four children, Patricia Ruth, Sandra 
Sue, Barbara Jean, and Shirley Anne. 
Robert W. Sonen is pastor at the First 
Unitarian Church at Norfolk, Virginia. 
He married Miss Olive E. Adams. Arthur 
G. VanReuth is with the Baltimore Tran- 
sit Company in Baltimore. Mankind , and 
married Miss Margaret E. Opitz. 



Telephone — Bob Newman, '37, now is 
in the Traffic Department of the Chesa- 
peake and Potomac Telephone Company. 



March, 1940 



General Alumni Reunion — May 31 



Maryland's Alumni Footbal Coaching Triumvirate 



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AL WOODS 



AL HEAGY 
BASEBALL LIST 

March 23— North Carolina Chapel Hill 

March 25 — Duke (doubleheader) Durham 

March 26 — Virginia Charlottesville 

March 30 — Dartmouth College Park 

April 1 — Vermont College Park 

April 6 — Pittsburgh College Park 

April 12 — Michigan College Park 

April 13 — Richmond Richmond 

April 17 — George Washington Co'leee Park 

April 20 — Richmond Richmond 

April 22 — William and Mary. Williamsburg 

April 23 — Randolph-Macon . . . Ash'and 

April 26 — North Carolina College Park 

April 27 — Washington College Chestertown 

ADril 29— Duke College Park 

May 2 — Wash, and Lee College Park 

May 4 — William and Mary College Park 

May 8 — Georgetown Washington 

May 10 — Virginia College Park 

May 11 — Georgetown College Park 

May 13— V. M. I College Park 

May 16 — West Virginia College Park 

May 17 — Washington and Lee Lexington 

May 18 — V. M. I. Lexington 

May 20 — George Washington Washington 
• 

TRACK SCHEDULE 

April 6 — V. P. I Blacksburg 

April 13— V. M. I College Park 

April 20 — Rutgers New Brunswick 

April 26-27 — Penn Relays Phi'ade'nhia 

May 4 — Virginia College Park 

May 11 — Army College Park 

May 18 — Southern Conference Chapel Hill 

• 

LACROSSE CARD 

March 23 — Mt. Washington College Park 

April 1 — Dartmouth College Park 

Arril 4 — Harvard College Park 

April 6 — Loyola College Park 

April 17 — Army West Point 

April 20 — Rutgers New Brunswick 

ADril 27— Penn State State College 

May 4 — Princeton Princeton 

May 11 — Navy Annapolis 

May 18 — Hopkins College Park 

• 

TENNIS MATCHES 

April 4 — William and Mary . . College Park 

April 12 — Richmond College Park 

April 13 — Michigan College Park 

April 16 — Tenrrole College Park 

April 20 — Hopkins College Park 

April 23 — Duke College Park 

April 24 — Virginia Co'lege Park 

Ariril 29 — Richmond Richmond 

May 1— Catholic U. College Park 

May 4 — George Washington College Park 

May 9-11 — Southern Conference 

Tourney Durham. N. C. 
May 17 — Georgetown College Park 

General Alumni Reunion — May 31 



JACK FABER 



Net Squad Expecting 
Another Big Season 

Phil Burkom, a junior from Baltimore, is 
the most improved player on the Maryland 
tennis team that is scheduled to open its 
season by entertaining William and Mary 
at College Park on April 4. 

His skill in the doubles has been es- 
pecially pleasing to Coach Les Bopst. The 
netmen got a good start by working out in 
Ritchie Coliseum. 

Allie Ritzenberg and Nathan Askin, 
the Southern Conference and Middle At- 
lantic collegiate doubles champions, of 
course, are the No. 1 and 2 men on the 
team, with Jack Phillips, another senior, 
next in line. 

Burkom is a junior, as are three others — 
Jim Hardy, Jim Burnside and Charlson 
Mehl and Harry Baugher and Doyle Royal, 
a pair of sophs, have added strength. 

Bopst's charges won 7 of 10 matches 
last year and should approximate that rec- 
ord this season. 

• 

Four Baseball Stars 
Are In Final Year 

Four of the bright lights on Maryland's 
baseball team are seniors — Pitchers 
"Lefty" Earl Springer and Pershing Mon- 
dorff; Adam Bengoechea, second base, and 
Hugh Keller, outfielder. 



Fine Spirit Is Shown 
In Football Drills 

Maryland's football squad, consistently 
hitting around 60, is displaying unusual 
enthusiasm and keenness in its spring 
drills under Jack Faber, Al Woods and Al 
Heagy, the trio of former Terp stars, 
alumni and faculty members. 

The gridders say that Faber and Woods 
are not half so tough on the football field 
as they are in their bacteriology and agro- 
nomy classes, respectively. Heagy, in the 
Chemistry Department, does no teaching. 

One big factor in the practice in addi- 
tion to the fine fellowship between the 
coaches and players, is that all of the men 
on the field get into action. When the 
divided squad is not running plays against 
each other, each of the three mentors takes 
a group and keeps it busy and interested. 

Right now double wing back running 
plays and passes from this formation are 
being stressed to later be blended with the 
single-wing set-ups. 

The gridders were due to finish on 
March 30 and their scrimmages showed 
plainly that the work on the attack had 
borne fruit. 

Clever Little Gridder 

Joe Hoopengardner, freshman from 
Hagerstown, has proved the best little 
rookie back in Maryland's spring grid drills. 
He is fast and rugged and can take it. 

Maryland Alumni News 



Nine Facing Problems 
At Short And First 

Maryland's baseball team was hiking 
South on an Easter when this was written, 
to play North Carolina March 23, Duke 
twice the following Monday and a finale 
with Virginia on the way home. 

The odds were all against Coach Burton 
Shipley's charges on the trip, as cold 
weather and a soggy field kept the 
squad from rapid advancement, and the 
Terps had to meet rivals who had prepared 
longer and under much better conditions. 
The team appeared pretty well fixed, 
except for first and short, where no men of 
outstanding caliber have shown. Loss of 
George Knepley, Eddie Johnson and 
Shorty Chumbris from the 1939 infield 
left too many gaps to fill in one year. 

Shipley's tentative batting order at the 
outset was as follows: 

Fritz Maisel or Bill England, right field; 
Adam Bengoechea, second base; Newton 
Cox or Arthur Rudy, first base; Hugh 
Keller, left field; Dick McHale, third base; 
Burton Culver, center field; Leib McDon- 
ald or Jim Wharton, short; Bob Burns or 
John Boyda, catcher. 

All are leftovers except McHale and the 
sophomore shortstop rivals. 

Lefty Earl Springer is the most advanced 
of the pitchers, but Pershing Mondorff 
and Charley Woodward of the vets also are 
ready, as are Lefty Leon Vannais and Ar- 
thur Woodward, sophs. Max Hunt, a husky 
and capable soph, only recently over from 
the grid drills. 

Mearle DuVall, catcher, and Ashton 
Garrett, first base candidate, also were late 
in coming from the grid squad. Both are 
sophs. DuVall should prove especially valu- 
able. 

Nine Stick Starters 
From Baltimore 

Twenty of the 24 members of Mary- 
land's intercollegiate lacrosse champion- 
ship squad are from Baltimore or vicinity, 
three are from the District of Columbia, 
and the other is from Hanover, Pa. 

Nine Baltimore boys started the open- 
ing game against Mount Washington at 
College Park on March 23. 

March, 1940 



LATE BULLETIN 

Maryland lost both its lacrosse 
and baseball openers, but showed 
strength despite defeats. The lacrosse 
team bowed to Mount Washington, 
3-8, and the nine, although getting 
16 hits to North Carolina's 8, drop- 
ped a 11-inning game, 7-8. Snow 
prevented the twin bill with Duke 
March 25. 



Track Team Worrying 
Over Field Events 

With such fine runners as Joe Murphy, 
Kenneth Barnes, Alan Miller, Gene Och- 
senreiter, Whitey Miller, Jim Kehoe, Bob 
Condon, Mason Chronister, and Tommy 
Fields available, stress in Maryland's track 
workouts is being placed upon the hurdlers 
and field events men. Murphy also is a 
fine broad jumper but Gordon Kluge in 
the javelin and Bob Porter in the high 
jump right now appear as the only other 
sure field events point-getters. 

Maryland's opener is slated with Vir- 
ginia Poly at Blacksburg on April 6. 

Shortage of hurdlers has caused Swede 
Eppley to decide to test Condon and 
Whitey Miller in these events. 

Charley Morris, shot putter and discus 
thrower, also should improve and place 
in many meets; Ralph Albarano should 
help with the shot, and Francis Morris 
may be counted upon to score often in the 
high and broad jumps. 

Elmer Rigby, sprinter; Jack Warfield 
and Randall Cronin, in the 440; Bob 
Montgomery, in the half; Ted Stell and 
Dick Sullivan, in the mile; Wylie Hopkins, 
in the high jump and hurdles; Bill Tilley, 
in the broad jump, and Bob Moseley, in 
the weights, are sophs who should chip in 
with some scoring. 



State Provides Most 
Of Diamond Squad 

Maryland's baseball squad, like the la- 
crosse outfit, practically is a State combi- 
nation. Twenty of the 23 men Coach 
Shipley plans to carry are Marylanders, 
two are from the District of Columbia, 
and Pennsylvania provides one. 

General Alumni Reunion — May 31 



Good Lacrosse Outfit 
Has Tough Beginner 

Maryland's biggest lacrosse task of the 
season will be history by the time this 
is read, as Mount Washington was down 
for the opener on March 23, and the 
Terps, unlike last season when they were 
keenly prepared and upset the clubmen, 
11-1, were not tuned for the affair. 

Pre-game dope was that the Terps were 
in for a rough afternoon from the revenge- 
seeking Mount Washington veterans, who 
put the shoe on the other foot this year 
by getting the extra preparation. 

It was a battle of champions as Mary- 
land holds the collegiate crown and Mount 
Washington is the ruler of the club realm. 

The Terps follow with games with 
Dartmouth, Harvard and Loyola of Bal- 
timore that they figured to take in their 
stride before making a trip to West Point 
to play Army on April 1". They all are 
tough from then on. 

Maryland's tentative first team contains: 
Mark Kelly, goal; Bill Graham, cover 
point; Leo Mueller, point; Milton Mulitz, 
first defense; Jack Mueller, second de- 
fense; Bill Cole, center; Jim Heil, second 
attack; Oscar Nevares, first attack; Jordan 
Sexton, out home; Bill Bond, in home. 

This is an all-letter wearing set-up, with 
the exception of Kelly, a soph. 

Jack Grier, goal; Fred Widener and 
George Lawrence, defense, and Chick 
Allen, attack, all letter men; Jack Garrett, 
a leftover, and Soph Al Slesinger, attack, 
offer clever reserve strength. 

It is an excellent outfit, once it gets in 
top trim, and will be a tough combination 
for any college rival to lick. 

Successful Mat Squad 
Led By Paul McNeil 

Paul McNeil, Maryland's 175-pound 
wrestler, won his thirty-third straight bout 
as the Terps closed their season by defeat- 
ing Lafayette. McNeil is a lineman on the 
football squad. 

The Terps had a fine season, winning 
6 of their 7 matches, the only defeat 
coming at the hands of a powerful Rut- 
gers outfit. 

In addition to Lafayette, the Terps beat 
Gallaudet, Haverford, Hopkins, Duke and 
Davidson. 



Portrait Of Dean DuMez 
Presented To University 

(Continued horn Page 4) 
Year Book, and, at present, Editor of the 
Scientific Edition of the A Ph. A. Journal, 
and, last year, he was honored by being 
elected to the office of President. 

In view of these accomplishments, the 
faculty and alumni of the School of Phar- 
macy and friends decided to have a por- 
trait painted of Dr. DuMez and to present 
it to the School of Pharmacy of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. Dr. DuMez has won 
a place in the hearts of his many friends 
and he has played a very important part 
in building our Alumni Association to the 
position which it occupies today. 

New York — Irving Cook, '40, of Foot- 
light Club, now is located in New Jersey 
with Pennock and Ford, makers of Ver- 
mont Syrups. He is the New Jersey repre- 
sentative for the Company. His address 
is Y.M.C.A., Passaic, New Jersey. 
O 

Birth — Mr. and Mrs. Victor H. Bauman 
announce the birth of a daughter, Donna 
Mabel, on February 27, 1940, at the Me- 
morial Hospital in Cumberland. Mrs. 
Bauman was formerly Miss Gladys Bull, 
31. 

o 

Visitor — Out of the west came a visitor 
last month by the name of Gomer Lewis, 
'25, a former Old Line gridiron star. 
Comer is a successful representative of 
the Mountain States Telephone and Tele- 
graph Company. He is located in Tucson, 
Arizona. Rumors preceded him to the 
campus that football officiating was one 
of his pastimes in which he was performing 
well. Gomer is a graduate of engineering 
and a member of Sigma Nu. 


Married — Miss Sarah Louise Short, '34, 
and Mr. Norbert Francis Sherman were 
married February 1", 1940, in Washing- 
ton, D. C. Mrs. Sherman is a member of 
the Alpha Omicron Pi sororitv, also Phi 
Kappa Phi national honorary fraternity. At 
the time of the wedding she was personnel 
assistant with the Social Security Board. 
The newly weds will reside at 4120 Ed- 
monds Road, N.E., Washington, D. C. 



Grapevine News About Those We Know 



10 



Married — Frederick C. Johnston, Jr., 
'38, and Miss Mary C. Tidball were mar- 
ried in Gainesville, Florida. The bride at- 
tended George Washington University. 
Fred is a member of Sigma Phi Sigma, 
and is doing special agriculture work in 
Florida. 

O 

To Wed — Miss Jean Hartig and Mr. 
Norborne A. Hite, both of Port Deposit, 
Maryland, are to be married this spring. 
Jean is a member of Tri-Delt, and Nor- 
borne is a member of Alpha Gamma Rho 
and is at present employed in Roanoke, 
Virginia. 

O 

To Wed — Miss Frances S. Rosenbusch, 
'41, has left school to marry Mr. Charles 
W. Cairnes of Cleveland, Ohio. Frances 
is a member of A. O. Pi and was active 
in student affairs. Mr. Cairnes is the son 
of Capt. George W. Cairnes, '03, of the 
U. S. Coast Guard. Mr. Cairnes is a gradu- 
ate of the Case School of Applied Sciences. 
The wedding will take place in June. 
o 

Married — Mr. George J. O'Hara, '31. 

and Miss Mary Teresa McQuillen of 

Washington were married November 22, 

1939, at St. Peter's Church in Washington. 

o 

Married — Miss Jessie F. Muncaster, '27, 
a graduate of Home Economics, married 
last summer Dr. William W. Richardson, 
a graduate of Ohio State and the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania. The Richardsons live 
at 143 South Pitt Street, Mercer, Penn- 
sylvania, where Dr. Richardson directs the 
Sanatorium. Dr. Richardson has studied 
abroad in Munich and Zurich. He is a 
member of several professional fraternities. 
"The welcome is out, for any Marylander 
who passes this way!" sav the Richardsons. 
O 

Engineering — Horace R. Higgins, '33, 
is at the National Bureau of Standards. He 
is an engineer working on Diesel fuels. 
O 

Chemist — Richard W. Ochenhausen, 
'35, employed by the General Chemical 
Company, is living at 2322 Common- 
wealth Avenue, Chicago. 

General Alumni Reunion — May 31 



Marriage — Mr. John E. Scott announc- 
es the marriage of his daughter, Eleanor V. 
Thomas, to Ensign William N. Thies. The 
wedding took place on Saturday, Novem- 
ber 11th, 1939, at four o'clock, at the 
Woodside Methodist Church, Silver 
Spring, Maryland. 

O 

Birth — Mr. and Mrs. C. R. Brown 
(Mrs. Brown was Aline Herzog, '29) are 
the proud parents of a baby daughter, Bar- 
bara Ellen, born September 26th. 

The Browns live at 105 Elmer Avenue, 
Schenectady, New York. 

o 

Agricultural Experiment Station — Mr. 

W. A. Connell, is at the Delaware Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station, Newark, Del- 
aware, continuing the salt marsh mosquito 
investigations which he began several years 
ago. 

o 

Engineer — Gabby Streett, '27, is an en- 
gineer with the Consolidated Gas and Elec- 
tric Company of Baltimore. 
O 

Insurance — You will be interested to 
know that James R. Troth, '31, was the 
dinner guest of Mr. James A. Fulton, Pres- 
ident of the Home Life Insurance Com- 
pany, for his outstanding performance dur- 
ing the months of Julv and August. Bob is 
living at 18 Whiteoak Road, Calvert Hills. 
Marvland. 

O 

Marquette — Dr. R. A. Littleford, '33. 
recently resigned as Associate Biologist at 
the Chesapeake Biological Laboratory to 
take a verv nice job at Marquette Univer- 
sitv, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, as Associate 
Professor. Littleford assumed his duties at 
Marquette on September 20th. 
O 

Freshman — Mr. Joseph Coster, B.S., 
'14, has matriculated his son as a freshman 
in the Universitv. The Costers live in Bal- 
timore. 

O 

Cafeteria Manager — Miss Marie Har 
desty, '39, a member of Alpha Delta, is 
now teaching home economics and mana- 
ging the cafeteria at Franklin High School 
in Reisterstown, Maryland. 

Maryland Alumni News 



»D 



Married — Miss Dorothy Williams, '39, 
daughter of E. P. Williams, '14, and Mr. 
Warren T. Davis. '39, were married in 
College Park. March 25. Warren, former 
lieutenant colonel in the R. O. T. C, now 
is an officer in the Army and stationed in 

Pennsylvania. 

o 

Married — Miss Mary Martha Heaps, 
'38, of Cardiff, Maryland, and Peter Cos- 
tello. Jr., were married last June. Martha 
is former Woman's Editor of both the 
Diamondback and the "M" Book. Slie 
was also a member of Kappa Kappa Gam- 
ma Sorority. 

O 

Birth — Mr. and Mrs. Donald Shook 
have a daughter, born February 25 last 
and Wendy Ann is her name. Daddy be- 
longs to the team of Don, '28, and Carr, 
'2 _ . orchestra leaders, at the Madrillon 
Club in Washington. "Carr" is Carr Van 
Sicklcr. Mrs. Shook was formerly Norma 
Persons, '33, a member of A. O. Pi. 
Xorma's sister, Gladys, '39, also a member 
of A. O. Pi. Don is a member of Theta 
Chi. The Shooks reside at 4526 Stanford 
Street. Chevy Chase, Mankind. 


White Plains, N. Y. — Two members 
of the Gilbert family arc in White Plains, 
X. Y. Irwin and Englc both are grads in 
the class of 1932. Irwin recently visited 
the campus. Their addresses are: Irwin, 
210 Martin Avenue, and Engle, 13 Lafay- 
ette Street. 

O 

Married — Frederick C. Johnston, Jr.. 
'3S, and Miss Mary C. Tidball were mar- 
ried in Gainesville, Florida. The bride at- 
tended George Washington University. 
Fred is a member of Sigma Phi Sigma, and 
is doing special agriculture work in Flor- 
ida. 



HIGH LIGHTS ON THE 
SPRING SCHEDULE 

April 20 — Engineering 
Alumni Banquet 

University Dining Hall 
—7:00 P.M. 

May 4 — Annual Track and 
Field Meet 

300 High and Prep 

School Athletes 
Varsity Events: Baseball 

with William and 

Mary 
Track with Virginia 
Tennis with George 

Washington 

May 1 — Spring Get-Together 
of "M" Club 

Beaver Dam Country 
Club — 6:30 P.M. ' 

May 7 — Annual Military Day 
Competitive Drill and 
Regimental Review 

May 13 — Seventeenth Annu- 
al May Day 

Crowning of the Queen 

May 31 — Forty-eighth An- 
nual Alumni Reunion 
Five-year Reunion Class- 
es: 1935, '30, '25, '20, 
'15, '10, '05, '00, '95, 
'90 

June 1 — One Hundred and 
Thirty-third Commencement 
Exercises 

11:00 A.M. in the Rit- 
chie Coliseum 



Old Line — Two former Gld Line edi- 
tors, Christine Kcmpton, '38, and Jerry 
Hardy, '39. are in varied work. Christine 
is with the National Theatre and Jerry 
does highway safety work with the Na- 
tional Education Association. 

O 
Birth — Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Gray have 
a young daughter born last August who is 
named Judith. Mrs. Gray, the former Jean 
Hamilton, '3 5, was a member of Kappa 
Delta Sorority. Ralph, a member of '37, 
now is in charge of radio work with the 
American Automobile Association. 

O 
Married — Ryland Lee Mitchell, Jr., and 
Miss Annabel Webb Hopkins were married 
last month at Bel Air, Maryland. Mrs. 
Mitchell is a graduate of William and 
Mary College. Lee is a member of the class 
of '38. The newly weds spent their honey- 
moon in Florida. They will reside in Aber- 
deen, Maryland. 

O 

Airlines — Former Diamondback sports 
writer, Herb Smith, '38, has taken to the 
air. He is with the American Airlines in 
New York City. 

O 

South Carolina — When the Terp Box 
ing Team journeyed to Columbia, S. C, 
for the Southern Conference Boxing Tour- 
nament they had a former Terp athlete 
to greet them. George B. Heinie, '25, now 
a manager for Southern Dairies with head- 
quarters in Florence, S. C. His wife, the 
former Margaret Prienkcrt, '27, was with 
him for the finals in the tournament. 

O 

Engaged— Elizabeth Smith, '39, Alpha 
Xi Delta, is now teaching at Wicomico 
High School, and is to be married this 
June. 



CUT ON THIS LINE 



ANCTHEC DRIVE IS CN 

\A^ i 1 1 You Join Your Fellow Alumni? 

=PLEASE FILL OUT AND RETURN THIS BLANK NOW ! ! 



Fellow Alumni: 

wish to be a contributing member of 
tie University of Maryland Alumni As- 
Dciation, and am enclosing the usual 
mount of $2.00 for the year 1939-1940, 
f this fifty cents is for one year's sub- 
cription to the Alumni News. 



Name Class Occupation 

Address 



Married? To whom ... 



Children 



Business address. 



Title. 



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Copyright 19-10, Liggett & Mycrs Tobacco Co. 




ALUMNI 
NEWS 



APRIL 
1940 



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FRIDAY, MAT 31 



COLLEGE PARK 



ON THIS DAY the traditionally famous Rossborough Inn will 
be officially opened. The Alumni placed a plaque upon this build- 
ing last year, dedicating its traditions as associated with the 
Alumni. Again the Alumni will participate in its traditions. 



The Order of the Day 



10:00 A. M. — Registration — New Administration Building (near the 
Rossborough Inn). 

10:30 A. M. — Sightseeing and Campus Visitations. 

11:00 A. M.— Class Reunions. 

12:00 M. — Flag Raising by the Class of 1890 — Fiftieth Anniversary. 

1:00 P. M. — Alumni Luncheon — University Dining Hall. 

2:00 P. M. — Annual Alumni Meeting. 

2:30 P. M. — Entertainment for Ladies. 

3:00 P. M. — Formal Opening of Rossborough Inn. 

4:00 P. M. — Soft Ball Games Between Reunion Classes. 

6:00 P. M. — Alumni - Faculty Dinner — University Dining Hall. 
Special Program of Entertainment. 

9:00 P. M. — Seventy-eighth Annual Commencement Ball. Only Alumni 
who attend Alumni Dinner will receive invitations. 



kt_ 



Volume XI 



MARYLAND ALUMNI NEWS. APRIL, 1940 



Number 11 



Alumni Association — University of Maryland 

Founded in 1892 



OFFICERS FOR 1939 - 40 

Charles W. Sylvester, '08, President 
Baltimore, Md. 

P. W. Chichester, '20, First Vice-President Frederick, Md. 

H. W. Burnside, '04, Second Vice-President Washington, D. C. 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Secretary-Treasurer College Park, Md. 

ALUMNI BOARD 
(Note — The officers named above are also members of the Alumni Board) 

J. Donald Kieffer, '30 Arts and Sciences 

Charles V. Koons, '29 Engineering 

R. R. Lewis, '19 Education 

John A. Silkman, '35 Agriculture 

Ruth Miles, '31 Home Economics 

Norwood Sothoron, '34 Commerce 

MEMBERS AT LARGE 

E. E. Powell, '13; Philip Wertheimer, '29 Men's Representatives 

Mary York Gadd, '28; Gertrude Chesnut, '27 Women's Representatives 

C. Walter Cole, '21 Immediate Past President 

G. F. Pollock, '23, Editor 

Maryland Alumni News, issued monthly by the University of Maryland Alumni Associa- 
tion at College Park, Md., as second-class matter under the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Annual Alumni Association dues are $2.00. One year's subscription to Alumni News, 
50 cents. 

GROUP LEADERS 

ALLEGANY COUNTY: E. Brooke Whitting, '98, President; Dr. Joseph Franklin, '21, Secretary, 

Cumberland, Md. 
BALTIMORE COUNTY: C. Walter Cole, '21, President; H. B. Derrick, '17, Secretary, Towson, 

Maryland. 
BALTIMORE CITY: Chester Tawney, '31, President, 4022 Roland Avenue; E. Gordon Ham- 
mond, '34, Secretary, 1023 W. Barre Street, Baltimore, Md. 
CAROLINE COUNTY: George W. Clendaniel, '20, President; Dr. Maurice A. Brackett, '21, 

Treasurer; Mrs. George W. Clendaniel, '21, Secretary, all of Denton, Md. 
HARFORD COUNTY: W. B. Munnikhuysen, '14, President; H. M. Carroll, "20, Secretary, 

Bel Air, Md. 
FREDERICK COUNTY: Guy K. Motter, '05, LL.B., President; Miss Ann "Nancy" Anders, 

'39. Secretary, Frederick, Md. 
MONTGOMERY COUNTY: Lawrence G. Smoot, '18, President, Kensington, Md.; Mary Fisher, 

'36, Secretary, Rockville, Md. 
NEW YORK CITY: Mr. James E. Dingman, '21, President, 32 Sixth Avenue; Sarah Morris, '25, 

Secretary, 310 East 44th Street, New York City. 
PHILADELPHIA: A. Moulton McNutt, '06, President, 413 Cooper Street, Camden, N. J.; J. P. 

Mudd, '07, Secretary, 174 Manheim Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
PITTSBURGH: E. Minor Wenner, '27, President, 1111 Gladys Avenue; Dr. A. A. Krieger, '32, 

Secretary Highland Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
WASHINGTON, D. C: J. Douglas Wallop, '19, President, 6139 N. Dakota Avenue, N.W.; 

Charles V. Koons, '29, Secretary, 419 Fourth Street, N.E., Washington. 
WASHINGTON COUNTY: Hon. Henry Holzapfel, Jr., '93, President, Hagerstown, Md.; L. G. 

Mathias, '23, Secretary, Hagerstown, Md. 

"M" CLUB OFFICERS AND BOARD MEMBERS 

A. K. Besley, '23 President Dr. E. N. Cory, '09 Secretary-Treas. 

[ames W. Stevens, '19 Vice-President G. F. Pollock, '23 Historian 

REPRESENTATIVES 



Mike Stevens, '37 Baseball 

W. C. Supplee, '26 Basketball 

Stewart McCaw, '35 Boxing 

E. E. Powell, '14 Lacrosse 

Roger Whiteford, '28 Track 



James Shumate, '20 Tennis 

John Gadd, '27 Cross Country 

Lewis W. Thomas, '28 Football 

Dr. E. B. Friedenwald, '03 } 
Dr. A. W. Valentine, '04 \ 



At Large 



Cover Picture 

Shows some of the trees on the oldest 
part of the campus. The oaks on the hill 
are always a memorable sight to the return- 
ing old grads. This section of the campus 
has not changed for over fifty years. The 
view from this spot looks onto new de- 
velopments and a rapidly changing cam- 
pus. The oaks "On the Hill" beckon your 
return on Friday, May 31. 



My Alumni Friends: 

May 31, 1940, is the date of our 48th 
Alumni Reunion. A fine program is being 
planned for your pleasure. The fifty-year 
class will be in the 
center of the spot- 
light, surrounded by 
the five year classes. 
This will be a gala 
occasion and you 
cannot afford to 
miss it. 

Plan to arrive at 
College Park by at 
least twelve o'clock 
noon and remain 
for the 78th Com- 
mencement Ball. 
Prove to the world by your attendance 
that no University in the land has more 
loyal, interested or enthusiastic Alumni. 
Meet and visit again with your friends. 
Friendship is, I believe, the most valuable 
asset any of us can have. Do we fully ap- 
preciate and enjoy it? 

A real attraction is on the schedule of 
events. Our President, "Curlev", realizing 
our attachment to and interest in the Ross- 
borough Inn, has arranged for the formal 
opening of this good, old, and well-known 
historic landmark. We do love it and of 
all the cherished spots on the campus, it is 
the one place where we can meet with a 
feeling of welcome and joy of the occasion. 
May it ever be the favorite meeting ground 
at College Park for all Alumni. For many 
of us who remember it years ago, we are 
grateful for the opportunity to have a part 
in its formal opening this year. Let us have 
a banner crowd to gather there. 

We want you to attend the business 
meeting of the association. There are many 
matters of importance to come before us, 
including some changes in the constitution 
which are outlined elsewhere in this issue 
(Continued on Page 4) 




Forty-eighth Alumni Reunion For All; 
Rossborough Inn Officially Opened ; 
Special Five Year Reunion Classes 



In the spring of the year an alummis's 
thoughts naturally turn to the old campus 
"On the Hill," its wide open spaces, green 
grass, and rolling landscape. Such thoughts 
always bring many old grads back to the 
campus to live those collegiate days over 
again, reminiscing and hobnobbing about 
this and that with old pals. 

Various haunts will be visited, the tower 
in Morrill Hall, the Library, the Dorms, 
the Varsity Grill, Joe's and back to the 
frat houses for a spell. 

A new attraction will be presented this 
day which has old traditions, the Ross- 
borough Inn, erected in 1798, for many a 
vear a roadside inn and social center, will 
be officially opened. Architectural changes 
in earlier years took away its original grace- 
ful lines, but today you will behold a re 
stored colonial structure in all of its elo- 
quence and beauty. Period furniture and 
landscaping add to the atmosphere of this 
historic inn. The alumni will be the first 
to view the restored historically and tradi- 
tionally famous landmark. 

New Administration Building 

Alumni will first assemble in the New 
Administration building, located in the 
rear of the Rossborough Inn. Here you will 
register and get your instructions for the 
remainder of the day. A spacious foyer in 
the new building provides an elegant place 
for the registration of old grads. 



Crothers To Reside 
In Cecil County 

Mr. and Mrs. Omar Crothers are moving 
to Cecil County, Omar's home ground. 
Omar is an attorney-at-law and a double 
graduate of Maryland . He first finished at 
College Park in '29 and then graduated 
from the Law School. Football was his 
sport in which he gained fame as an All- 
Maryland guard. Omar and Hamilton 
Whiteford, '26, are law partners in Bal- 
timore. Mrs. Crothers was formerly Miss 
Margaret Jefferson of the Eastern Shore. 



Alumni Day is for every alumnus with 
extra emphasis placed upon the return of 
the five-year classes. Those who will lead 
the Alumni Day class parade are: 

1895— Dr. W. W. Skinner 

1900— W. D. Groff 

1905— A. A. Parker 

1910— W. P. Cole. Jr. 

1915— Richard Dale 

1920— George B. Hockman 

1925 — Page Gardner 

1930— Albert Heagy 

1 9 3 5 — Tracey Coleman . 

In addition, those classes, like 1892, 
1908, 1921, and several who always have 
an annual reunion, will be on hand. 
Annual Meeting 

At the annual meeting special reorgani- 
zation plans will be presented as well as 
amendments to the constitution. Special 
amendments will increase representation 
on the General Alumni Board for the va- 
rious colleges. Opportunitv for organization 
of alumni by colleges and their electing 
representatives to the Board will be pre- 
sented. A revision in the tenure of offices 
and the forming of a council to represent 
each and every school and college in the 
University is to be presented. The business 
meeting will not be unduly long, but will 
be interesting. Great plans are being made 
to have more alumni represented in the 
affairs and development of our gTeater Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 

No alumnus should miss the Alumni Re- 
union, as each alumnus makes the day a 
success for fellow alumni. 

Friday, May 31st — from morning 'til 
night. • 

K. A. Minstrels 

Director of the twentieth annual Cot- 
ton Pickers' Minstrels, by the Kappa Alpha 
Fraternity was Flo Small, '37, former star 
in dramatics on the campus. Flo was as- 
sisted by Bernie Ulman, the fleet gridiron 
halfback. 

Robert Bradley, Maryland star 125- 
pound boxer, was at the piano for the mu- 
sical numbers. 



Alumni In Cecil County 
Plan Group Organization 

On a recent visit to Port Deposit, Mary- 
land, the Alumni Secretary, G. F. Pollock, 
met with an Alumni Committee where 
plans were made for a county organization. 
Miss Sarah Jack, '35, will act as tempo- 
rary chairman and secretary'. Others on the 
committee are George Morrison, '31, of 
Tome Institute; Miss Alice Taylor, '30, 
now teaching; Ralph Beachley, '22, high 
school principal at North East; Miss Mar- 
garet Jack, '39, substitute teaching; Dr. 
William G. Jack, '06, physician; Miss 
Catherine Roe, '36, and Wilson Dawson, 
'35, teacher at Tome High School. 

Mr. dimming, principal of Tome High 
School, where the meeting was held, also 
attended the meeting. His son, William 
K. Cumming, now is a student at College 
Park. 

Motion pictures of the recent campus 
developments and a football game were 
shown. There was considerable enthusiasm 
and interest in organizing a group in Cecil 
Countv. 



U. S. Marines — Lieut. Fairfax Walters, 
'36, now in the Aviation Corps of the U. 
S. Marines, stopped by the University on 
one of his flying trips, to pay a visit. He 
now is located at Quantico, where there 
are several more Old Liners stationed. 
Lieut. Col. Bernard Dubel, '17, Lieut. 
Col. Galen M. Sturgis, '17, Major C. T. 
Bailey, '23, Major Ralph Lanigan, '26, Ma- 
jor Edward Pugh, '25, Major John Hough, 
'25, Major Joseph Berger, '25, and Lieut. 
Louis Ennis, '37. Walters indicated an 
alumni meeting would probably be held 
there sometime in the near future before 
transfers will be in order. Practically all of 
them expected to attend the "M" Club 
rallv on Mav 1. 



My Alumni Friends: 

(Continued from Page 3) 
of the News. We look forward to some 
changes which will surely stimulate greater 
interest in the work of the University. 

I shall expect you at College Park on 
Friday. May 31. 

Cordially yours. 

Charles W. Sylvester, 

President. 



General Alumni Reunion — May 31 



Maryland Alumni News 



CELEBRATING 25™ REUNION 




1 
II 



5 



Class Of 1915 In 25th 
Reunion Spotlight 

From all indications the members of 
1915 will return to the campus on Friday, 
May 31, in numbers sufficient to make all 
classes envious of their reunion loyalty and 
spirit. Richard Dale and C. H. Buchwald 
are a committee of two in charge of the 
reunion. 

Their faces are somewhere in the class 
picture on this page; see if some of the old- 
timers can find them. Anyway, you will 
see both at College Park on Alumni Day. 

The class reunions will be for the pur- 
pose of compiling a then and now book 
on the class activities during the past 
twenty-five years, as well as prophecies for 
the next twentv-five. 



Sigma Nu — A call has been sounded for 
all good Sigma Nus to assemble at the 
chapter house for their annual alumni 
meeting on Saturday, May 4, the date of 
Maryland's big field meet. 

The active boys of Delta Phi are plan 
ning a big reunion for their older brothers. 
"Rip - ' Hewitt, top mogul, assures a good 
time for all. 

Dinner will be the first part of the pro- 
gram, followed by a few short talks and a 
business meeting and lots of time for a 
general fellowship get-together. 



Publication 
Banquet 



J. Marshal Mathias, '35, former Editor 
of the Diamondback, will be toastmaster 
at the annual University Publications Ban- 
quet, to be held Friday, May 3, at the 
Manor Club. Joe now is a reporter for the 
Washington Post. 

The introduction of new staff members 
and the annual tapping of Pi Delta Epsi- 
lon, honorary' journalistic fraternity, will 
be the high lights of the evening. 

Officers Installed 

For the ensuing year, Orvillc Shirey of 
Cumberland and a student in the College 
of Arts and Science, will be editor of the 
Diamondback. Head of the Terrapin, stu- 
dent yearbook, is David Johnson, a student 
in Agriculture, who hails from Takoma 
Park. Charles Ksanda, head of the Old 
Line, is from Washington and a student 
in the College of Arts and Science. 

Other Diamondback appointments are 
Lois Kemp, of Baltimore, Women's Edi- 
tor; Judsson Bell, of Aberdeen, Business 
Manager; Turner Timberlake, of Magnolia, 
as Sports Editor. The Terrapin adds Lida 
Sargeant, of Silver Spring, as Women's 
Editor, and Gerald Prentice, of I lyattsville, 
as Managing Editor. New offices of the 
Old Line staff are Margaret Wallace of 
Bethesda as Women's Editor; George Kep 



Home Economics 
Alumnae To Organize 

Alumnae of the College of Home Eco- 
nomics are invited to spend Saturday, May 
18th, at the University. There will be 
plenty of time given for thorough inspec- 
tion of the new Home Economics Build- 
ing and the equipment. The meeting, be- 
ginning at 1 1 o'clock, w ill include remi- 
niscences, an informal discussion of family 
and professional success, and plans for the 
organization of an alumnae group. 

Carolyn Chesser, '30, Director of Home 
Economics at the Electric Institute of 
Washington, will be chairman of the alum- 
nae committee for the day. Luncheon will 
be served in the Home Economics Build- 
ing at 1 o'clock, followed by a style show. 
A news letter with details of the program 
will be sent to all alumnae before the meet- 
ing. It will be appreciated if all the alum- 
nae will spread the news of the meeting of 
May 18th. 

The open house program is under the 
supervision of Dean Marie Mount, College 
of Home Economics. 



hart, of Takoma Park, as Business Mana- 
ger; Walter Kerwin. of Washington, as 
Art Editor, and Neal Hathaway, of Univer- 
sitv Park, as Associate Editor. 



April, 1940 



General Alumni Reunion — May 31 



5 



Student Grange Celebrate 
Twenty-fifth Anniversary 

On May the second one of the oldest 
student organizations, the Student Grange, 
celebrated their twenty-fifth anniversary. 
One of their founders and first faculty ad- 
viser of the organization, Reuben Brig- 
liam, '08, now with the information de- 
partment of the U. S - . D. A., will be the 
principal speaker. 

Dr. H. J. Patterson, former Director of 
the Agriculture Experiment Station, later 
Dean of the College of Agriculture, now 
retired, and one who was largely respon- 
sible for the early beginning of the Grange 
and its continued perpetuation, will be the 
honored guest. 

Master T. Roy Brookes of the State 
Grange, will present a twenty-five year cer- 
tificate of loyalty for continuous mem- 
bership to a prominent alumnus and fac- 
ulty member. 

All former members of the Student 
Grange are cordially invited to attend. 
Call Arthur Hamilton, Greenwood 3800, 
for vour reservation. 



The Shadow Of A Man 

(By the Late Dr. House) 

Before leaving his home in College Park 
for a tour in the midwest and the Pacific 
coast in the summer of 1938, Dr. Homer 
C. House assembled and arranged for pub- 
lication all poems which he wished to ap- 
pear under the title, "The Shadow of a 
Man." Death made his untimely call while 
on this trip, on August 28, 1938, leaving 
the compiled work to be completed by Dr. 
House's friends. 

The book has been published, and the 
News takes this occasion to thank Mrs. 
Lillian Chase House, widow, for her 
thoughtfulness in presenting the Alumni 
Association with a copy. Many of Dr. 
I louse's former students we are sure would 
be interested in having a copy of this book. 
Any one desiring same can write the Alum 
ni Office. The cost is $2.25 per copy. 

The following is an excerpt from com- 
ments: 

"This posthumous collection represents 
the rich harvest of a lifetime — the rich 
reaping of a thinking, feeling man of our 



Student Government Elects 
John Reckord, President 

When the final count was made, John 
Reckord, of Baltimore, a major in the Col- 
lege of Commerce, was elected President 
of the Student Government Association. 
John is a nephew of Major General Mil- 
ton A. Reckord, commander of the Mary- 
land National Guard. 

Vice-Presidency of the Student Govern- 
ment went to Norman "Reds" Miller, in 
the College of Agriculture, from Prince 
George's County. Miss Barbara Boose, of 
Washington, a major in the College of Ed- 
ucation, won the office of Secretary-Treas- 
urer. 

President of the Men's League went to 
Robert Meyer, of Baltimore, a major in 
Agriculture. The Women's League top 
honor was won by Carolyn Gray, of Pooles- 
ville, of the College of Education. 

Vice-Presidency of the Women's League 
went to Mary Virginia Bolden of the Col- 
lege of Education, from Oakland, Mary- 
land. Doris McFarland, of Cumberland, 
and a student in Home Economics, won 
the position of Secretary, while Martha 
Rainalter, also of Cumberland and the Col- 
lege of Home Economics, won the Treas- 
urership. 

Tom Coleman, retiring President of the 
Student Government, announced there are 
99 nominations for the various class offices; 
elections to fill these offices will be held 
later in the vear. 



Correction — The News regrets the er- 
ror in the note about Mr. and Mrs. George 
R. Heine, '25. First, George's middle ini- 
tial is R. and Not B. as was printed. Mrs. 
Heine was formerly Miss Margaret 
Schwartz. Both attended the Southern 
Conference Boxing Tournament at Co- 
lumbia, South Carolina. They live at Flor- 
ence, South Carolina, where George is 
manager for Southern Dairies. 



own time. Compressed into stunning poet- 
ry. Homer House has bequeathed to us 
something more tangible than his shadow; 
a book that is more of him than many of 
his closest friends knew." 



Three Prominent 
Dental Alumni Die 

In recent weeks the Dental Alumni As- 
sociation has suffered the loss of three 
prominent members. 

Dr. Orem Henry Gaver, '18, D.D.S., 
for many years an outstanding member of 
the faculty as professor of Physiology. At 
the time of his graduation he was award- 
ed the Magna Cum Laude. He immedi- 
ately began work as an instructor in clin- 
ical dentistry and later became superin- 
tendent of the Dental Clinic. 

One Of Fifteen Children 

He was a member of a family of fifteen 
children and the first to die. Five of his 
brothers are University graduates and one 
sister. His brothers were: Gaither C, '21, 
Ph.G.; Paul G., '24, Ph.G.; Herman S., 
'26, Ph.G.; Grason W., '22, D.D.S., and 
Leo J., M.D., '39. His sister, Norma, now 
Mrs. Daniel W. Justice, was in Nursing, 
'21. Dr. Gaver 's son, Orem, Jr., now is in 
the predental class at the University. 

Dr. Gaver was an active fraternal man 
and there was no one more interested or 
loyal to the Alumni Association than he. 
He was a past president of the Maryland 
State Dental Association and a member of 
the Anne Arundel County Board of Edu- 
cation. Dr. Gaver died March 28. 
Dr. Rossmann 

Another Baltimorean and prominent 
dentist was Dr. Louis Rossmann, '15, 
D.D.S., from the oldest dental school in 
the world, the Baltimore College of Den- 
tal Surgery, now a part of the University's 
Dental School. Lou, as his fellow alumni 
called him, was much interested in ath- 
letic endeavors and took an active part him- 
self, especially in golf. He was one of Bal- 
timore's star amateurs. 

He was a member of the State Board of 
Dental Examiners and at the time of his 
death, he was president of the Board. He 
was a member of the Maryland State Den- 
tal Association and an active alumnus. He 
took a very active part in the Dental Cen- 
tennial held recently in Baltimore. Dr. 
Rossmann died April 2, 1940. He is sur 
vived by his widow. 

Dr. McCooey 

In Worcester, Massachusetts, State Sen- 
ator Joseph P. McCooey, '08, D.D.S., suc- 
(Contimwd on Page 7) 



General Alumni Reunion — May 31 



Maryland Alumni News 



Sigma Phi Sigmas 
Show Off New Home 

A new fraternity house graces the sur- 
roundings in College Park. The Sigma Phi 
Sigmas have an elaborate new home, lo- 
cated one block off of College Avenue, 
toward the Stadium. Picture above. 

It is a splendidly arranged house and 
the construction was supervised by one of 
their own engineers, George O. Weber, 
'33, president of his class. 

The doors are open, with a general wel- 
come to all Alumni to visit them on 
Alumni Day. 



Engineers Held 
Successful Reunion 

Success was the result of the first an- 
nual reunion banquet of the Engineering 
College Alumni held Saturday, April 20, 
on the campus of the University. One hun- 
dred and twenty engineering Alumni were 
enthusiastic over the splendid return and 
results of the meeting. Herschel H. Allen, 
'10, now with the Griener Engineering 
Company in Baltimore, was toastmaster. 
Dr. H. C. Byrd, '08, President of the Uni- 
versity and a graduate of the Engineering 
College, was principal speaker. His talk 
was quite inspirational and enlightening on 
the general aims and policies of the Uni- 
versity. "Alumni are to become more of a 
definite part in the University develop- 
ments, know more about what is being 
done and to have a kener insight in the 
University accomplishments, because it is 
our Alumni who carry the benefits of the 
University's teachings to the people of our 
states," said Dr. Byrd. 

Other speakers were J. Hanson Mitchell, 
'98, first graduate of the College of Engi- 
neering; Dr. T. H. Taliaferro, former Dean 
of the College; Professor S. S. Steinberg, 
now Dean of the College, and C. V. 
Koons, '29, Engineering Representative 
on the Alumni Board. 

Many of the old-timers were present for 
the affair. J. Darby Bowman, '02, James H. 
Anderson, '04, C. A. Warthen, '08, and 
Grover C. Day, '08. 

Much credit is due the steering commit- 
tee, headed by John Firmin. Other help- 
ful members were Joe Deckman, '31, John 



NEW FRAT HOUSE 




— «„r - -r: 



Sigma Phi Si 



gma 



Bell, '32, Sam McGlathery, '33, Bell Ross, 
'34, Henry Chick, '35, Joe Harris, '36, 
Phil Firmin, '37, Joe Bennett, '38, and 
Tom Wharton, '39. 

Plans are now under way to so perfect 
an Engineering College Alumni Associa- 
tion which will make this reunion an an- 
nual occasion. 

Among those present were: 

1940— E. Kent Bebb, William H. Wat- 
kins. 

1939— William B. Davis, T. P. Wharton, 
Jack Hollbrook, Herbert P. Hall, John 
P. Smith, Jr., Eugene F. Mueller, Jr., 
Henry W. Jones, L. H. R. McGill. 

1938 — John R. Pearce, John R. Browning, 
Arnold A. Korab, Fred Kluckhuhn, Aus- 
tin S. Horman, Henry Latterner, Jr., Al- 
bert P. Backhair, Robert S. Diggs, John 
L. Andrews, Jr., H. Malcolm Owens, 
George A. Bowman, Joseph H. Bennett. 

1937— Robert J. McLeod, Wright G. Cal- 
der, Philip Firmin, Harold L. Kelly, Jr., 
John W. Heiss, Herman W. Berger, Jr., 
C. F. Jones, George E. Gilbert, Doran 
S. Piatt. 

1936— Peter F. Hilder. Rov F. Bartelmes. 
R. F. Hardie, H. Melvin'Steen, Fred H. 
Minke, Lyle F. Parrott, Andrew B. Bev- 
eridge, Harry Bryan, Richard E. Vol- 
land, Joseph M. Louis Park, J. S. Rim- 
mer. 

1935— Charles H. Ludwig, Allan M. 
Thomas, Jr., Tracy C. Coleman. Clin- 
ton G. Light, Jr., E. Austin Davis, Henry 
M. Chick, Edward S. Barber, Joseph 
H. Pyles, K. F. Baldwin, C. T. Foltz, 
Harding Zimmisch. 

1934— A. C. Layman, J. Paul Bowker, 
Stanley C. Love, John T. Dressel, A. 
Van Reuth, Howard C. Turner, G. O. 
Ralston. 

1933— Norman B. Belt, L. Melvin Rob- 
erts, Stanley D. Shinn, Samuel E. Mc 
Glatherv, Charles T. Mothersead, Roger 
Peed, Wm. P. Starr, Charles E. Kitchin, 



George O. Weber, Howard M. Biggs, 
Robert E. Dunnine, Lewis G. Phillips, 
John M. Bowie, William Taylor Ful- 
ford. 

1932— C. V. Whalin, Jr., C. W. Bogen. 

1931— F. L. Holloway, Kenneth S. Kess- 
ecker, John Mitton, Joseph H. Deck- 
man, Robert C. Home, Theodore A. 
Mowatt. 

1930— W. H. Fifer, Charles A. Willmuth. 

1929— Julian U. Bowman, C. V. Koons, 
Jav V. Hall, Jr. 

1926— J. B. Lilts, R. S. Caruthers, Frank 
W. Rothenhoefer. 

1925— H. R. Aldridge. 

1923— H. J. Toodvine, A. G. Wallis. 

1921— H. R. Peddicord. 

1918— M. O. Pvle. 

1911— H. Roland Devilbiss. 

1910— Herschel H. Allen. 

1908— C. A. Warthen, Grover C. Dav. 

1904— J. A. Anderson. 

1902— J. Darley Bowman. 

Faculty — R. B. Allen, John Lowe, Nor- 
man Moore, L. J. Hodgins, Myron 
Creese. 



Three Prominent 
Dental Alumni Die 

(Continued from Page 6) 
cumbed following a short illness. He was 
a prominent civic and political figure, hav- 
ing won the Democratic election from a 
strong Republican rival in a Republican 
district. 

Dr. McCooey was a sport enthusiast and 
himself had been quite a participant dur- 
ing his school and college days. 

The News takes this occasion to con- 
vey its sincere condolence to the bereaved 
family and friends of our fellow alumni. 



April, 1940 



General Alumni Reunion — May 31 



Old Line Athletic Contributions 



Action Galore Assured 
on Field Day, May 4 

Maryland's annual Field Day, the twen- 
ty-third such affair, at College Park on 
May 4, is big doings for the Terps in the 
immediate future, although the track, ten- 
nis, baseball and lacrosse outfits constantly 
are offering attractive contests. 

All of the varsity Spring teams will be 
seen in action that day, except the stick- 
men, who will play the previous afternoon 
at Princeton in a game that will go a long 
way toward deciding the disposition of the 
national collegiate title the Terps now hold. 

Here is the home card for May 4: 

10 A. M.: Tennis — Freshmen vs. Tech 
High. 

1 P. M.: Tennis — Varsity vs. George 
Washington. 

1 :30 P. M.: Annual interscholastic meet, 
with 1 3 open events, and seven events and 
two relays closed to county high schools; 
also special relay races for Maryland In- 
terscholastic Association and Washington 
public high schools; Varsity meet with 
Virginia to be run concurrently. 

3:30: Baseball — Varsity vs. William and 
Man- in a Southern Conference clash. 

Washington-Lee High and Bel Air High 
are the defending team champions in the 
open and county high school events, re- 
spectively. 

Maryland will be favored in all its events, 
except the track meet with Virginia, hurd- 
lers and pole vaulters giving the Cavaliers 
the edge. Frank Fuller, one of the world's 
greatest hurdlers, heads the Virginia team, 
while such ace runners as Joe Murphy, Jim 
Kehoe, Mason Chronister, Alan Miller, 
Tommy Fields and others are Maryland's 
strength. 

Including all of the teams, more than 
500 athletes will be seen in action during 
the day. 

• 

"Baby" Of Ball Team 

Maryland has an extremely youthful ball 
team, with Leib McDonald, Soph infielder 
from Sparks, Md., being the "baby" of 
the squad. He is only 18. 



= By W. H. ("Bill") HOTTEL = 

ELEVATES TENNIS 




LES BOPST, '17 

Associate State Chemist, who gets 
a lot of pleasure out of building up the 
net game at Maryland. His 1940 team, 
which has been hampered by the un- 
usually bad weather, scored 9-0 shut- 
outs over William and Mary and 
Temple in the first two matches. It 
then lost to Duke and beat Virginia. 



Terps Make Strong Bid 
In Penn Carnival 

Maryland had Joe Murphy in the 100- 
yard invitation and five relay teams listed 
in the University of Pennsylvania carnival 
that was staged at Philadelphia on April 
26 and 27, but it was not certain that they 
would run in all of them. 

The Terps were entered in the mile, two 
miles, four miles, sprint medley and the 
distance medley and, while the competition 
was tough in all events, they figured they 
might bring home at least one champion- 
ship. 

Maryland's runners for the various events 
were: 

Joe Murphy, Kenny Barnes, Alan Mil- 
ler, Vernon Miller, Jack Warfield, Gene 
Ochsenreiter, Mason Chronister, Tom 
Fields and Bob Condon. 



Three Tough Contests 
Ahead of Stickmen 

Maryland's lacrosse team was about to 
step into the tough end of its schedule by 
meeting Princeton in the latter's field in 
Tigertown on May 3 when this was writ- 
ten. Games with Navy at Annapolis May 
1 1 and Hopkins at College Park a week 
later will complete the card. 

After losing to Mount Washington, 
3-8, with a team which was not prepared 
for the test on account of the fact that 
Jack Faber and Al Heagy, the lacrosse 
mentors, were with the stick squad only 
two days before the game by reason of 
being occupied with the gridmen in Spring 
practice, the Terps scored six straight col- 
legiate victories. 

Maryland had little difficulty in dispo- 
sing of Dartmouth, Harvard, Loyola of 
Baltimore, Army, Rutgers and Penn State 
in that order. The closest tilts were with 
the West Pointers and Rutgers, both beat- 
en, 6 to 2. 

While the Terps are good this season, 
they have not yet shown quite the class 
that brought them the collegiate crown 
last Spring, and right now Princeton and 
Hopkins, both high in manpower and fin- 
esse, are favored over the champs. 

Maryland and Navy rate more nearly 
on a par, with the Terps probably having 
a slight edge. 

All three games, though, should be fine 
battles, no matter how thev result. 



Brothers Playing Ball 
For Varsity, Frosh 

Outfielder Frederick Maisel and Pitcher 
Lefty Leon Vannais of the varsity 7 nine 
both have brothers on the Terp freshman 
squad. 

Phil Vannais is a catcher and Bob Mais- 
el is another outfielder. 

The Maisels, who are from Catonsville, 
are sons of Fritz Maisel, ex-Yankee third 
baseman and later manager of the Balti- 
more Orioles. 



S 



General Alumni Reunion — May 31 



Maryland Alumni Neics 



Winter Sports Squads 
Honored At Banquet 

Maryland's Athletic Board honored its 
varsity winter sports teams at a banquet at 
Indian Spring Country Club on April 26 
at which letters were awarded. 

Stanley Scherr. Baltimore lawyer and 
chairman of the Maryland Athletic Com- 
mission, and Paul Menton, sports editor 
of the Evening Sun, were the principal 
speakers. 

President H. C. Byrd. athletic officials 
and leaders and coaches were among those 
present, in addition to the members of 
the various teams. 

Those rewarded follow: 

Varsity Basket Ball — *Adam Bengoe- 
chea. *Pershing Mondorff, *Milton Mu- 
litz, ''Bill Rea. George DeWitt, Gene 
Ochsenreiter, Charley Weidinger, Mearle 
DuVall, Leon Vannais, Arthur Wood- 
ward, and Manager * George Heil. Fran- 
cis Beamer received gold award. 

Varsity Boxing — *Nate Askin, *New- 
ton Cox, * Israel Leites, Norman Hatha- 
way, Josh Hughes, Isadore Alperstein, Bob 
Bradley, John Harn, George Pyles, Man- 
ager * James Healey and * Robert Wilson, 
Freshman manager. 

Vanity Rifle — *W. C. Jensen, *T. W. 
Riley, *R. W. Laughead, *F. G. Car- 
penter, A. E. Imus, R. L. Hodges, J. C. 
Marzolf, L. H. Haskin, H. D. Fugitt, Man- 
ager *J. M. Marzolf and *S. M. Whalen, 
Freshman Manager. Enos Ray got gold 
award. 

Wrestling (Minor Letter) — Robert T. 
Ayres, Henry J. Rockstroh, Wilfred A. 
Council, William Watson, Paul McNeil 
and Bill Krouse. 

Soccer (Minor Letter) — Edward J. 
Daugherty, Edgar Faulkner and Arthur 
Rudy. 

Varsity gold awards go to Seniors who 
have been on the squad three years and 
who have won their letter at least once. 



Basketers Are Golfers 

George DeWitt, Maryland's all-Southern 
Conference basketer, is playing No. 1 on 
the Terps' golf team. Bill Rea, another 
member of the quint, also is on the team. 
The sport is getting varsity recognition at 
Maryland for the first time. 



Coaches Are Gratified 
With Grid Drills 

Maryland's Spring football practice was 
pleasing to the coaching triumvirate of Jack 
Faber, Al Woods, and Al Heagy. 

Most of the time was spent in trying to 
locate tackles, the big problem for 1940, 
and in testing out new offensive tactics that 
will be employed next Fall. Good progress 
was made in both phases. 

George Gienger, fast 200-pounder who 
played guard last Fall, showed aptitude at 
tackle, and others also gave promise in the 
position. 

Jack Gilmore, a triple threat, and Joe 
Hoopengardner, were Soph backs to dis- 
play unusual promise. 

An odd angle to the drills was that they 
were finished without a center. Bob Smith, 
1939 regular, did not report on account of 
a knee operation in December; Jim Whar- 
ton, his understudy, went over to baseball; 
Frank Blazek was taken ill, and Charlie 
Ruppersberger, of the yearlings, was hurt 
nearly a week before the sessions were 
over. John Cordyack, a blocking back, 
took over the last few days. 



Frosh Riflemen Sweep 
Their Eight Matches 

Members of Maryland's Freshman rifle 
team, which completed the season with a 
clean slate in eight dual meets, were among 
the yearlings of three squads to be award- 
ed numerals for competition in winter 
sports. 

Frosh boxers and basketers also were 
rewarded, the complete list being: 

Basket Ball — Joe Bauman, Richard 
Cleveland, David Fetters, Irving Floyd, 
Dick Greer, Irving Gordy, James Horn, 
Robert Johnson, John Provost, Phil Van- 
nais and Henry Thompson. 

Boxing — Judson Lincoln, Henry Ben- 
son, Matthew Mazzonetti, Dave Galliher, 
Edward Jacques, Ramon Grelecki, Carl 
Twigg, Paul Mattix, Lester Schlup and 
Herb Gunther. 

Rifle — Paul Newgarden, George New- 
garden, R. H. Rivello, U. A. Geller, W. A. 
Schack, R. C. Davis, W. A. Reith, R. H. 
Benson, R. D. Rands and R. E. Bullard. 



Hardest Games Remain 
For Baseball Team 

Hampered by rain and ground conditions 
for almost half of its schedule, a capable 
Maryland ball team still has the thorniest 
part of its path to travel. 

The team, which won four of its first 
seven tilts it was able to play, starts a tell- 
ing list of 11 battles when Duke invades 
on April 29, seven of which will be staged 
at home. 

Here are the remaining games: 

April 29— Duke. 

May 2 — Washington and Lee; 4 — Wil- 
liam and Mary, 3:30; 8 — Georgetown at 
Washington; 10 — Virginia; 11 — George- 
town, 2:30; 13— V. M. I.; 16— West Vir- 
ginia; 17 — Washington and Lee at Lex- 
ington; 18 — V. M. I. at Lexington; 20 — 
George Washington at Griffith Stadium, 
Washington. 

All home games for which time is not 
given start at 4 P. M. 

Maryland has four fine pitchers in the 
veterans Lefty Springer and Persh Mon- 
dorff and Max Hunt and Lefty Vannais, 
Sophs, but the weather kept them from 
getting the needed action, and, of course, 
the whole team was retarded for the same 
reason. 

• 

Freshmen Start Well 
With Four Triumphs 

Maryland's Freshman aggregations got 
off on the right foot by winning the first 
four events in which they took part. 

The yearling lacrosse team beat St. 
Paul's, 5 to 3, and City College, 9 to 3; 
the rookie ball team shut out Rockville, 
5 to 0, Dick Cleveland holding his old 
mates to a lone hit and swatting a homer 
himself, while the frosh tracksters step- 
ped on Central High, 76 to 46. 

The baby netmen were kept from mak- 
ing a start by weather conditions. 

In all, the yearlings had 25 events listed, 
but so far two ball games and a tennis 
match have been rained out. 

The stick squad appears to be strongest 
of the frosh aggregations and the only one 
likely to have a clean slate. 



April. 1940 



General Alumni Reunion — May 31 



IN SENATORIAL RACE 




Grapevine News About Those We Know 



SENATOR RADCLIFFE, '03 

Senator George L. Radcliffe, '03, LL.B. 
from our Law School, enters the Sena- 
torial race in Maryland for the second time. 
His first try was successful, when he was 
elected to the U. S. Senate in 1934. 
He was born and raised on the Eastern 
Shore of Maryland, has been a successful 
lawyer and has taken an active part in civic 
endeavors. Senator Radcliffe has been an 
active Alumnus. He served as Toastmaster 
for the One Hundred and Thirty-second 
Annual Charter Day Celebration. Both 
Senators from the State of Maryland at the 
present time are fellow Alumni. Senator 
Millard E. Tydings, '10, is senior Senator. 



Married — Ed. Rankin, '32, and Miss 
Faye Cohen were married this past win- 
ter. They are residing in New York. Ed. 
is a member of Tau Epsilon Phi and is 
remembered for his prowess on the basket 
ball court in his collegiate days. 



Married — John Fales, '36, and Miss 
Betty Hancock are married. John is a grad- 
uate in Agriculture and a member of 
Lambda Chi Alpha. 



Dietitian — Dorothy Huff, '39, and for- 
mer president of Tri Delt, is doing die- 
tetic work at National Park College, For- 
est Glen, Md. 



Big League Notes 

Several Old Liners of recent vintage are 
with the pros. "Moose" Surgent, '38, is 
with Springfield in the Three Eye League. 
Eddie Johnson, '39, is with Norfolk. 

Charley Keller, '39, of the New York 
Yankees. "Bozey" Berger, '32, is with To- 
ronto of the International League. 

Going back in history, Vic Keene, '23, 
was in the top circuit for several years. In 
1903, Cy Nichol was a major shortstop 
for the Athletics. 

Burton Shipley, '14, was in the Blue 
Ridge League, later a manager and now a 
collegiate coach. No doubt many more 
could be traced to the majors but that's 
a good crop for the present. 



Engineers — In White Plains, N. Y.. 
Howard Vernay, '38, and Charles Kam- 
mer, '40, are doing engineering work on the 
Delaware Aqueduct project. Both are mem- 
bers of A. T. O. 

O 

Birth — Mr. and Mrs. J. Slater Davidson 
announce the arrival of their second son, 
Charles Tompkins, on the 10th of April. 
Mrs. Davidson is the former Miss Lida 
Moyer of Washington. Slater is a member 
of the class of '28, and grad in civil engi- 
neering. Now he is chief engineer in the 
Washington office of the Charles H. 
Tompkins Co., construction engineers. 
They reside at 524 Ridgewood Ave., Chevy 
Chase, Md. 



Banking — In Washington, Mary Hed- 
da Bohlin, '39, and a member of Tri Delt, 
is with the Federal Reserve Bank. 



Lawyer — Arthur C. Keefer, '17, former 
resident of the Rossborough Inn in his 
college days, now is a lawyer in Washing- 
ton, D. C. Arthur has often said, "If the 
walls of the old building could talk" what 
tales thev would have to tell! 



Chemist — Arthur Hcrsberger, '32, got 
his master's degree in '33, and his Ph.D. 
in '36, now is assistant chemist for the At- 
lantic Refining Co., in Lansdowne, Pa. He 
married Miss Lucille Stinnett, 
o 

Married — Kenneth Stambaugh, '36, and 
Miss Winnie Bayley were married this past 
winter. Ken is a member of Lambda Chi 
Alpha. 

O 

Tires — Manager of the Goodrich Tire 
Company in Washington, D. C, is Joseph 
Caldara, '31, a member of Alpha Tau 
Omega. He married Miss Christine Finzel, 
of Allegany County. They reside at 7819 
Eastern Ave., Takoma Park, Md. 



Research — Down in Cairo, Georgia, 
John Painter, '22, is in charge of research 
on the Tung Oil Nut trees. John is a 
member of Alpha Tau Omega. 

O 
Illinois — Word has been received that 
George M. "Speedy" Merrill is out in East 
St. Louis, Illinois, at the Edgmont Sta- 
tion of the Department of Agriculture. 
"Speedy" is a World War veteran. 

O 
Philadelphia — John Silkman, '35 Ag., 
now is connected with the Swift & Co., in 
Philadelphia. John's address, however, is 
818 DeKalb Street, Norristown, Pa. 

O 
Social Editor — Up in Port Chester, N. 
Y., one of Maryland's former May Queens 
and associate women's editor of the Dia- 
mondback, Miss Margaret Maslin, '39, now 
is social editor of the Port Chester Daily 
Item. Peggy is a member of Tri Delt and 
resides in her home town, Port Chester. 

O 
Philadelphia — There is another very 
enthusiastic alumnus in Philadelphia, Mr. 
Thomas E. Clemens, '07, LL.B., now a 
roofing and heating engineer. Mr. Clem- 
ens also is a writer and will soon present 
some of his new books to the University 
Library. He can be reached at 2118 West 
Atlantic Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



10 



General Alumni Reunion — May 31 



Maryland Alumni News 



Birth — Dr. and Mrs. Joseph A. Sedla- 
cek arc the proud parents of a baby boy. 
Mrs. Sedlacek was formerly Miss Ruth E. 
Shipley of Cumberland. Dr. Sedlacek is a 
member of the class of '32. 
o 

Engaged — William Howard Henderson, 
'36, and Miss Margaret Ford Cooper of 
Chcstcrtown are engaged. Miss Cooper is 
a graduate of Washington College and now 
is with the Harrington High School in 
Delaware. Bill, '36, and a member of 
Alpha Gamma Rho, is an instructor in 
agriculture at Greensboro High School. 
O 

Bristol — Word has reached this office 
that Miss Catherine E. Aitcheson, '36, 
Home Economics, now is with the Kings 
Mountain Memorial Hospital in Bristol, 
Virginia, as dietitian. Any Marylander who 
happens that way should call Catherine 
and find out what to eat. 
O 

Greetings from Panama — Capt. Ray- 
mond Stone, Jr., '21, has been sent to the 
Canal Zone and one of the first things he 
did was to send greetings to his fellow 
alumni. Ray is stationed at Balboa. He is 
sending a Kapok (silk cotton) tree to the 
University for the Alumni Memento col- 
lection. Thanks to Ray, and now maybe 
more will follow suit. 


Married — Miss Emily Louise Rcinohl, 
'34. and Professor James Burton Outhouse 
were married March 21 at Riverdale, Mary- 
land. Louise is a member of Kappa Delta 
Sorority and is employed at the Beltsville 
Research Center. Professor Outhouse is a 
member of the faculty at the University in 
the Animal Husbandry Department. The 
newlywcds will reside on West Madison 
Avenue, Hyattsville, Md. 



CALENDAR 

for MAY 



May 4 — Field Day 

Annual Track Meet 

May 7 — Military Day 
Competitive Drill 

May 13 — May Day 
Crowning 
Queen of the May 

May 18 — 

Home Economics 
Alumni Reunion 

May 29 — 

Honors Award 
Assembly 

May 3 1 — Alumni Day 
Forty-eighth Reunion 

June 1 — 
Commencement Exercises 



Engaged — Emerson DeForgc Ogle, '37, 
and Miss Marian Chase of Catonsville are 
to wed this summer. Emerson now is em- 
ployed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Miss 
Chase is a graduate of Goucher and Smith 
Colleges. 



Delaware — Roger L. Pierpont, '33, Col- 
lege of Agriculture, now is located at the 
University of Delaware. His address will 
now be 51 W. Main Street, Newark, Del. 
O 

Law— Mr. II. Ross Black, Jr., '29, 
LL.B., '32, announces the opening of of- 
fices for the general practice of law at 318 
Baltimore Trust Building, Baltimore, Md. 
Ross was business manager of the Dia- 
mondback in 1927. 
O 

Building Material — Joseph II. Deck- 
man, '33, engineering, is secretary-treasur- 
er for the R. Robinson Company, Building 
Material, 2301 Pennsylvania Avenue, S. E., 
Washington, D. C. Joe, for a pastime, 
coaches the newly formed Washington La- 
crosse Club. 



Married — John J. McCarthy, '38, and 
Miss Helen Phillips of Washington, were 
recently married. Mrs. McCarthy is a grad 
of Wilson Teacher's College. John, a form- 
er Old Line gridiron star, now is with the 
Charles L. Norris, Realtor, of Washington. 


Birth— Mr. and Mrs. R. T. Slaby have 
a young son, Daniel Drake. Mrs. Slaby is 
the former Lillian Drake, '35. Mr. Slaby 
is with the Remington-Rand office in 
Washington. 



Accountant — William R. Walton, Jr., 
'26, Commerce, now is a certified public 
accountant, located in Baltimore. His bus- 
iness address is in the Munsey Building. 



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^PLEASE FILL OUT AND RETURN THIS BLANK NOW ! ! 



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mount of $2.00 for the year 1939-1940, 
f this fifty cents is for one year's sub- 
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FRANCESCA SIMS 

of TEXAS 

Chesterfield Girl of the Month 



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